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Technical Paper

Porosity Control in Ti-13Nb-13Zr Alloy Produced by Powder Metallurgy

2006-11-21
2006-01-2545
Titanium and titanium alloys are excellent candidates for aerospace and surgical implants applications owing to their high strength to weight ratio and good corrosion resistance. Among the titanium alloys recently developed, Ti-13Nb-13Zr is distinguished for presenting low modulus of elasticity, high mechanical resistance and superior biocompatibility, suitable for springs, bellows, surgical implants and aerospace parts with high resistance to shock and explosion damage. The alloys processing by powder metallurgy eases the obtainment of parts with complex geometry and near-net shape. In this work, results of the porosity control in the Ti-13Nb-13Zr alloy produced by powder metallurgy are presented. The samples were characterized for phase composition, microstructure and microhardness by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and Vickers indentation, respectively. It was shown that the porosity level depends on the compaction pressures, sintering temperatures and holding times.
Technical Paper

Sintering of Titanium Alloys for Advanced Aerospace Systems

2005-11-22
2005-01-4180
Titanium alloys parts are ideally suited for advanced aerospace systems because of their unique combination of high specific strength at both room temperature and moderately elevated temperature, in addition to excellent corrosion resistance. Despite these features, use of titanium alloys in engines and airframes is limited by cost. The alloys processing by powder metallurgy (P/M) eases the obtainment of parts with complex geometry. In this work, results of the Ti-6Al-4V alloys production are presented. Samples were produced by mixing of initial metallic powders followed by uniaxial and cold isostatic pressing with subsequent densification by sintering between 900 up to 1500 °C, in vacuum. Sintered samples were characterized for phase composition, microstructure and microhardness by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and Vickers indentation, respectively.
Technical Paper

Developing of New Titanium Alloys by Powder Metallurgy for Aerospace Applications

2003-11-18
2003-01-3605
Titanium alloys parts are ideally suited for advanced aerospace systems because of their unique combination of high specific strength at both room temperature and moderately elevated temperature, in addition to excellent general corrosion resistance. Despite these attractive features, use of titanium alloys in engines and airframes is limited by cost. The alloys processing by powder metallurgy eases the obtainment of parts with complex geometry and probably, cheaper. In this work, results of the Ti-6A1-4V, Ti-6Al-7Nb and Ti-13Nb-13Zr alloys production are presented. Samples were produced by mixing of initial metallic powders followed by uniaxial and cold isostatic pressing with subsequent densification by sintering at 1500 C, in vacuum. Sintered samples were characterized for phase composition, microstructure and microhardness by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and Vickers indentation, respectively. Density was measured by Archimedes method.
Technical Paper

Production of Ti-35Nb Alloy by Powder Metallurgy for Aerospace Application

2004-11-16
2004-01-3339
Titanium and its alloys provide high strength-to-weight ratios, good fatigue strength and increased corrosion resistance compared with others materials. Its acceptance in aerospace has been limited by costs considerations such as high cost of raw material, high buy-to-fly ratios and expensive machining operations. Significant cost reductions can be obtained by vacuum sintering and powder metallurgy (P/M) techniques by producing near net shapes and consequently minimizing material waste and machining time. The Ti 35Nb alloy exhibit a low modulus of elasticity. Stemming from the unique combination of high strength, low modulus of elasticity and low density, this alloy is intrinsically more resistant to shock and explosion damages than most other engineering materials. Samples were produced by mixing of initial metallic powders followed by uniaxial and cold isostatic pressing with subsequent densification by sintering between 900 and 1600 °C, in vacuum.
Technical Paper

Production of Ti-35Zr-10Nb Alloy by Powder Metallurgy for Automotive Application

2004-11-16
2004-01-3353
The automotive industry has identified several automobile components that could be replaced with titanium alloy components, either through direct replacement in existing designs or, preferably, in new designs to fully exploit the unique properties of titanium. The alloy processing by powder metallurgy (M/P) eases the obtainment of parts with complex geometry and, probably, cheaper. In this work, results of the Ti-35Zr-10Nb alloy production are presented. This alloy due to its high wear, impact and corrosion resistance is a promising candidate for automotive applications. Samples were produced by mixing of initial metallic powders followed by uniaxial and cold isostatic pressing with subsequent densification by sintering between 900-1400 °C, in vacuum. Sintering behavior was studied by means of dilatometry. Sintered samples were characterized for phase composition, microstructure and microhardness by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and Vickers indentation, respectively.
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