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Standard

Vision Factors Considerations in Rear View Mirror Design

1995-06-01
HISTORICAL
J985_199506
The design and location of rear viewing mirrors or systems, and the presentation of the rear view to the driver can be best achieved if the designer and the engineer have adequate references available on the physiological functions of head and eye movements and on the perceptual capabilities of the human visual system. The following information and charts are provided for this purpose. For more complete information of the relationship of vision to forward vision, see SAE SP-279.
Standard

Vision Factors Considerations in Rear View Mirror Design

2002-12-13
HISTORICAL
J985_200212
The design and location of rear viewing mirrors or systems, and the presentation of the rear view to the driver can be best achieved if the designer and the engineer have adequate references available on the physiological functions of head and eye movements and on the perceptual capabilities of the human visual system. The following information and charts are provided for this purpose. For more complete information of the relationship of vision to forward vision, see SAE SP-279.
Standard

Vision Factors Considerations in Rearview Mirror Design

1967-04-01
HISTORICAL
J985_196704
The design and location of rear viewing mirrors or systems, and the presentation of the rear view to the driver can be best achieved if the designer and the engineer have adequate references available on the physiological functions of head and eye movements and on the perceptual capabilities of the human visual system. The following information and charts are provided for this purpose. For more complete information of the relationship of vision to forward vision, see SAE SP-279.
Standard

Vision Factors Considerations in Rearview Mirror Design

1988-10-01
HISTORICAL
J985_198810
The design and location of rear viewing mirrors or systems, and the presentation of the rear view to the driver can be best achieved if the designer and the engineer have adequate references available on the physiological functions of head and eye movements and on the perceptual capabilities of the human visual system. The following information and charts are provided for this purpose. For more complete information of the relationship of vision to forward vision, see SAE SP-279.
Standard

Vision Factors Considerations in Rearview Mirror Design

2009-02-13
HISTORICAL
J985_200902
The design and location of rear-viewing mirrors or systems, and the presentation of the rear view to the driver can best be achieved if the designer and the engineer have adequate references available on the physiological functions of head and eye movements and on the perceptual capabilities of the human visual system. The following information and charts are provided for this purpose. For more complete information of the relationship of vision to forward vision, see SAE SP-279.
Standard

Vision Factors Considerations in Rearview Mirror Design

2016-11-07
CURRENT
J985_201611
The design and location of rear-viewing mirrors or systems, and the presentation of the rear view to the driver can best be achieved if the designer and the engineer have adequate references available on the physiological functions of head and eye movements and on the perceptual capabilities of the human visual system. The following information and charts are provided for this purpose. For more complete information of the relationship of vision to forward vision, see SAE SP-279.
Standard

Class "A" Vehicle Glazing Shade Bands

1969-07-01
HISTORICAL
J100_196907
This SAE Recommended Practice establishes boundaries for shade bands on glazed surfaces in class "A" vehicles. These boundaries are located so that the shade band will provide driver vision protection from glare, and occupant comfort with respect to solar radiation. Since shade bands transmit less visible light than surrounding glazed surfaces, the boundaries establish limits for the driver's field of view.
Standard

Class "A" Vehicle Glazing Shade Bands

1988-03-01
HISTORICAL
J100_198803
This SAE Recommended Practice establishes boundaries for shade bands on glazed surfaces in class "A" vehicles. These boundaries are located so that the shade band will provide driver vision protection from glare, and occupant comfort with respect to solar radiation. Since shade bands transmit less visible light than surrounding glazed surfaces, the boundaries establish limits for the driver's field of view.
Standard

Class "A" Vehicle Glazing Shade Bands

1995-06-01
HISTORICAL
J100_199506
This SAE Recommended Practice establishes boundaries for shade bands on glazed surfaces in class "A" vehicles. These boundaries are located so that the shade band will provide driver vision protection from glare, and occupant comfort with respect to solar radiation. Since shade bands transmit less visible light than surrounding glazed surfaces, the boundaries establish limits for the driver's field of view.
Standard

Class "A" Vehicle Glazing Shade Bands

1999-11-08
HISTORICAL
J100_199911
This SAE Recommended Practice establishes boundaries for shade bands on glazed surfaces in clas "A" vehicles. These boundaries are located so that the shade band will provide driver vision protection from glare, and occupant comfort with respect to solar radiation. Since shade bands transmit less visible light than surrounding glazed surfaces, the boundaries establish limits for the driver's field of view.
Standard

Class "A" Vehicle Glazing Shade Bands

2005-01-05
HISTORICAL
J100_200501
This SAE Recommended Practice establishes boundaries for shade bands on glazed surfaces in class "A" vehicles. These boundaries are located so that the shade band can provide occupant comfort and driver vision protection from glare, with respect to solar radiation, under some lighting and driving conditions. Since shade bands transmit less visible light than adjacent glazed surfaces, the shade band boundaries establish boundaries for the driver's field of view.
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