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A Guide to Aircraft Power Train Monitoring

2017-07-19
CURRENT
AIR4174A
The purpose of this SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is to provide management, designers, and operators with information to assist them to decide what type of power train monitoring they desire. This document is to provide assistance in optimizing system complexity, performance and cost effectiveness. This document covers all power train elements from the point at which aircraft propulsion energy in a turbine or reciprocating engine is converted via a gear train to mechanical energy for propulsion purposes. The document covers aircraft engine driven transmission and gearbox components, their interfaces, drivetrain shafting, drive shaft hanger bearings, and associated rotating accessories, propellers, and rotor systems as shown in Figure 1. For guidance on monitoring additional engine components not addressed, herein (e.g., main shaft bearings and compressor/turbine rotors), refer to ARP1839.
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A GUIDE TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF A GROUND STATION FOR ENGINE CONDITION MONITORING

1994-02-01
HISTORICAL
AIR4175
An effective ground station is vital to the successful implementation of an EMS and is a fundamental part of the total monitoring system design. Unlike on-board processing systems which principally use data to indicate when engine maintenance is required, ground stations offer much greater processing power to analyse and manipulate EMS data more comprehensively for both maintenance and logistics purposes. This document reviews the main EMS functions and discusses the operating requirements which will determine the basic design of a ground station, including the interfaces with other maintenance or logistics systems. A brief discussion is also included on some of the more recent advances in EMS ground station technology which have been specifically developed to provide more effective diagnostic capabilities for gas turbine engines. Finally, this document addresses the program management requirements associated with the initial development and on-going support of a ground station.
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A Guide to the Development of a Ground Station for Engine Condition Monitoring

2005-02-16
HISTORICAL
AIR4175A
An effective GSS is vital to the successful implementation of an EMS and is a fundamental part of the total monitoring system design, including asset management. Unlike the on-board part of the EMS which principally uses real time data to indicate when engine maintenance is required, a GSS can offer much greater processing power to comprehensively analyze and manipulate EMS data for both maintenance and logistics purposes. This document reviews the main EMS functions and discusses the operating requirements used to determine the basis design of a GSS, including the interfaces with other maintenance or logistic systems. A brief discussion is also included on some of the more recent advances in GSS technology that have been specifically developed to provide more effective diagnostic capabilities for gas turbine engines.
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The Preparation and Use of Chromel-Alumel Thermocouples for Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines

1956-03-01
HISTORICAL
AIR46
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) reviews the precautions which must be taken and the corrections which must be evaluated and applied if the experimental error in measuring the temperature of a hot gas stream with a thermocouple is to be kept to a practicable minimum. Discussions will focus on Type K thermocouples. These are defined in NBS Monograph 125 as nickel-chromium alloy versus nickel-aluminum alloy thermocouples.
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A GUIDE TO AIRCRAFT TURBINE ENGINE VIBRATION MONITORING SYSTEMS

1992-03-10
HISTORICAL
AIR1839A
This Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is a general overview of typical airborne vibration monitoring (AVM) systems with an emphasis on system hardware design considerations. It describes AVM systems currently in use. The purpose of this AIR is to provide information and guidance for the selection, installation, and use of AVM systems and their elements. This AIR is not intended as a legal document but only as a technical guide.
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A Guide to Aircraft Turbine Engine Vibration Monitoring Systems

2001-07-01
HISTORICAL
AIR1839B
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is a general overview of typical airborne engine vibration monitoring (EVM) systems with an emphasis on system design considerations. It describes EVM systems currently in use and future trends in EVM development.
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A Guide to Aircraft Turbine Engine Vibration Monitoring Systems

1992-02-01
HISTORICAL
AIR1839
This Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is a general overview of typical airborne engine vibration monitoring (EVM) systems applicable to fixed or rotary wing aircraft applications, with an emphasis on system design considerations. It describes EVM systems currently in use and future trends in EVM development. The broader scope of Health and Usage Monitoring Systems, (HUMS ) is covered in SAE documents AS5391, AS5392, AS5393, AS5394, AS5395, AIR4174.
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A Guide to Aircraft Turbine Engine Vibration Monitoring Systems

2008-02-16
HISTORICAL
AIR1839C
This Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is a general overview of typical airborne engine vibration monitoring (EVM) systems applicable to fixed or rotary wing aircraft applications, with an emphasis on system design considerations. It describes EVM systems currently in use and future trends in EVM development. The broader scope of Health and Usage Monitoring Systems, (HUMS ) is covered in SAE documents AS5391, AS5392, AS5393, AS5394, AS5395, AIR4174.
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A Guide to Aircraft Turbine Engine Vibration Monitoring Systems

2017-01-04
CURRENT
AIR1839D
This Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is a general overview of typical airborne engine vibration monitoring (EVM) systems applicable to fixed or rotary wing aircraft applications, with an emphasis on system design considerations. It describes EVM systems currently in use and future trends in EVM development. The broader scope of Health and Usage Monitoring Systems, (HUMS ) is covered in SAE documents AS5391, AS5392, AS5393, AS5394, AS5395, AIR4174.
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Guide to Life Usage Monitoring and Parts Management for Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines

1998-05-01
HISTORICAL
AIR1872A
The effectiveness of Engine Life Usage Monitoring and Parts Management systems is largely determined by the aircraft-specific requirements. This document addresses the following areas: a Safety b Life-limiting criteria c Life usage algorithm development d Data acquisition and management e Parts life tracking f Design feedback g Cost effectiveness It primarily examines the requirements and techniques currently in use, and considers the potential impact of new technology to the following areas: a Parts classification and control requirements b Failure causes of life-limited parts c Engine life prediction and usage measurement techniques d Method validation e Parts life usage data management f Lessons learned g Life usage tracking benefits
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GUIDE TO LIFE USAGE MONITORING AND PARTS MANAGEMENT FOR AIRCRAFT GAS TURBINE ENGINES

1988-02-29
HISTORICAL
AIR1872
The effectiveness of Engine Life Usage Monitoring and Parts Management systems is largely determined by the aircraft-specific requirements. This AIR addresses the following areas: a Safety. b Life-limiting criteria. c Life usage algorithm development. d Data acquisition and management. e Parts life tracking. f Design feedback. g Cost effectiveness. This AIR primarily examines the requirements and techniques currently in use, including: a Parts classification and control requirements. b Failure causes of life-limited parts. c Engine life prediction and usage measurement techniques. d Method validation. e Parts life usage data management. f Lessons learned. g Life usage tracking benefits.
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Guide to Limited Engine Monitoring Systems for Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines

2016-11-29
CURRENT
AIR1873A
This Aerospace Information Report (AIR) describes a Limited Engine Monitoring System that can be used by the flight crew or the maintenance staff, or both, to monitor the health of gas turbine engines in aircraft. This AIR considers monitoring of gas path performance and mechanical parameters, and systems such as low cycle fatigue counters and engine history recorders. It also considers typical measurement system accuracies and their impact. This AIR is intended as a technical guide. It is not intended to be used as a legal document or standard. AIR 1873 supplements ARP 1587, Aircraft Gas Turbine Engine Monitoring System Guide.
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Guide to Life Usage Monitoring and Parts Management for Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines

2011-09-29
CURRENT
AIR1872B
The effectiveness of Engine Life Usage Monitoring and Parts Management systems is largely determined by the aircraft-specific requirements. This document addresses the following areas: safety, life-limiting criteria, life usage algorithm development, data acquisition and management, parts life tracking, design feedback, and cost effectiveness. It primarily examines the requirements and techniques currently in use, and considers the potential impact of new technolog to the following areas: parts classification and control requirements, failure causes of life-limited parts, engine life prediction and usage measurement techniques, method validation, parts life usage data management, lessons learned, and life usage tracking benefits. SAE ARP1587 provides general guidance on the design consideration and objectives of monitoring systems for aircraft gas turbine engines.
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Temperature Measuring Devices Nomenclature

1996-06-01
CURRENT
ARP485A
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) defines the nomenclature of temperature measuring devices. General temperature measurement related terms are defined first, followed by nomenclature specific to temperature measuring devices, particularly thermocouples.
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Software Interfaces for Ground-Based Monitoring Systems

2001-09-01
HISTORICAL
AS4831
To establish a specification for software input and output interfaces for condition monitoring and performance programs used to monitor equipment from multiple manufacturers. The purpose of standardizing these interfaces is to improve operational flexibility and efficiency of monitoring systems as an aid to cost effectiveness (e.g., easier implementation).
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GUIDE TO ENGINE OIL SYSTEM MONITORING

1992-01-22
HISTORICAL
AIR1828A
The purpose of this SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is to provide information and guidance for the selection and use of oil system monitoring devices and methods. This AIR is intended to be used as a technical guide. It is not intended to be used as a legal document or standard. The scope of this document is limited to those inspection and analysis methods and devices that can be considered appropriate for routine maintenance. In agreement with industry usage, wear particle size ranges are given in micrometers (1 μm = 10-3 mm = 10-6 m).
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GUIDE TO OIL SYSTEM MONITORING IN AIRCRAFT GAS TURBINE ENGINES

1984-03-01
HISTORICAL
AIR1828
The purpose of this Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is to provide information and guidance for the selection and use of oil system monitoring devices and methods. This AIR is intended to be used as a technical guide. It is not intended to be used as a legal document or standard. The scope of this document is limited to those inspection and analysis methods and devices which can be considered appropriate for routine maintenance. In agreement with industry usage, wear particle size ranges are given in μm (1 μm = 10-3 millimeter = 10-6 meter). Other dimensions are given in millimeters, with inches in parenthesis.
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Guide to Engine Lubrication System Monitoring

2005-06-27
HISTORICAL
AIR1828B
The purpose of this SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is to provide information and guidance for the selection and use of lubrication system monitoring methods. This AIR is intended to be used as a technical guide. It is not intended to be used as a legal document or standard. The scope of this document is limited to those inspection and analysis methods and devices that can be considered appropriate for routine maintenance.
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