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Standard

Positioning the H-Point Design Tool—Seating Reference Point and Seat Track Length

2008-08-29
CURRENT
J4004_200808
This SAE Recommended Practice describes how to position and posture the H-point design tool (HPD) described in Appendix B, and how to establish the seating reference point (SgRP), design H-point travel path, and other key reference points that are used in the design and specification of both driver and passenger seat positions. This practice also provides a method for determining the length of the seat track for a driver seat that adjusts fore/aft. The seat track length is based on a desired level of driver accommodation, assuming a U.S. population containing an equal number of male and female drivers. The procedure can be used to establish driver seat track accommodation for new vehicle designs or to evaluate accommodation in existing vehicles. A general method for determining driver seat track length for any driver population (male and female stature distribution) at any selected accommodation percentile and gender mix is given in Appendix A.
Standard

Motor Vehicle Driver and Passenger Head Position

2017-10-11
CURRENT
J1052_201710
This SAE Standard describes head position contours and procedures for locating the contours in a vehicle. Head position contours are useful in establishing accommodation requirements for head space and are required for several measures defined in SAE J1100. Separate contours are defined depending on occupant seat location and the desired percentage (95 and 99) of occupant accommodation. This document is primarily focused on application to Class A vehicles (see SAE J1100), which include most personal-use vehicles (passenger cars, sport utility vehicles, pick-up trucks). A procedure for use in Class B vehicles can be found in Appendix B.
Standard

Motor Vehicle Driver and Passenger Head Position

2010-09-30
HISTORICAL
J1052_201009
This SAE Standard describes head position contours and procedures for locating the contours in a vehicle. Head position contours are useful in establishing accommodation requirements for head space and are required for several measures defined in SAE J1100. Separate contours are defined depending on occupant seat location and the desired percentage (95 and 99) of occupant accommodation. This document is primarily focused on application to Class A vehicles (see SAE J1100), which include most personal-use vehicles (passenger cars, sport utility vehicles, pick-up trucks). A procedure for use in Class B vehicles can be found in Appendix B.
Standard

Motor Vehicle Dimensions

2009-11-20
CURRENT
J1100_200911
This SAE Recommended Practice defines a set of measurements and standard procedures for motor vehicle dimensions. The dimensions are primarily intended to measure the design intent of a vehicle within a design environment (i.e., CAD). All dimensions in this practice can be measured this way. In addition, some dimensions can be taken in an actual vehicle. If measurements are taken on physical properties, some differences in values should be expected. Also, care should be taken to not confuse design intent measurements with those taken on a physical property. It is intended that the dimensions and procedures described in this practice be generic in their application to both the HPM, described in SAE J826, and the HPM-II, described in SAE J4002. In some circumstances, the figures may only reflect one or the other.
Standard

Driver Hand Control Reach

2007-02-27
HISTORICAL
J287_200702
This recommended practice describes boundaries of hand control locations that can be reached by a percentage of different driver populations in passenger cars, multi-purpose passenger vehicles, and light trucks (Class A vehicles). This practice is not applicable to heavy trucks (Class B vehicles).
Standard

Driver Hand Control Reach

2016-03-11
CURRENT
J287_201603
This recommended practice describes boundaries of hand control locations that can be reached by a percentage of different US driver populations in passenger cars, multi-purpose passenger vehicles, and light trucks (Class A vehicles). This practice is not applicable to heavy trucks (Class B vehicles).
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