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Technical Paper

Achieving a Lightweight and Steel-Intensive Body Structure for Alternative Powertrains

2011-04-12
2011-01-0425
FutureSteelVehicle’s (FSV) objective is to develop detailed design concepts for a radically different steel body structure for a compact Battery Electric Vehicle (BEV). It also will identify structure changes to accommodate larger Plug-In Hybrid (PHEV) and Fuel Cell (FCEV) vehicle variants. The paper will demonstrate seven optimised structural sub-systems that contribute to the programme's 35 percent mass reduction goals and meet its safety and life cycle emissions targets. It will explain the advanced design optimisation process used and the resulting aggressive steel concepts.
Technical Paper

Material Modeling Effects on Impact Deformation of Ultralight Steel Auto Body

2000-10-03
2000-01-2715
This paper describes the results of the computational analysis of UltraLight Steel Auto Body (ULSAB) crash simulations that were performed using advanced material modeling techniques. The effects of strain-rate sensitivity on a high strength steel intensive vehicle was analyzed. Frontal and frontal offset crash scenarios were used in a finite element parametric study of the ULSAB body structure. Comparisons are made between the crash results using the piece-wise-linear isotropic plasticity strain-rate dependent material model, and the isotropic plasticity material model based on quasi-static properties. The simulation results show the importance of advanced material modeling techniques for vehicle crash simulations due to strain-rate sensitivity and rapid hardening characteristics of advanced high strength steels.
Technical Paper

Material Applications in ULSAB-AVC (Advanced Vehicle Concepts)

2002-07-09
2002-01-2074
Advanced high strength steels were a key enabling factor in achieving the remarkable results of the ULSAB-AVC (Advanced Vehicle Concepts) Program. The complete body structure consists of high strength steels with over 80% being advanced high strength steel grades. Vehicle weight reduction, reduced costs and improved safety performance are the main driving forces behind material selection for automotive applications. High strength steels (HSS) have demonstrated their ability to meet these demands and consequently have been the fastest growing light-weighting material in vehicle structures for the past decade. The evolution in steel technology in recent years has produced new grades of highly formable, advanced high strength steel (AHSS) grades that will continue to meet these automotive demands into the next decade.
Technical Paper

Metal Forming Characterization and Simulation of Advanced High Strength Steels

2001-03-05
2001-01-1139
The remarkable evolution of steel technology in recent years has resulted in the development of new High Strength Steels (HSS) that are increasingly used in today's automobiles. The advanced performance of these grades in ductility and rapid hardening characteristics provides an opportunity to stamp complex geometries with in-panel material strengths far exceeding those of conventional high strength grades of steel. This provides an opportunity to improve an automotive body's performance in crash, durability and strength while reducing the overall weight of the vehicle. An improved understanding of the forming characteristics of these advanced HSS and accurate prediction of the material processing strain will allow vehicle designers to fully explore the opportunities of increased yield, strain hardening, formability and strength and the potential this creates to reduce mass and improve the performance of the automotive body.
Technical Paper

Steel Strength and Processing Effects on Impact Deformation for a Crash Energy Management Component

2001-03-05
2001-01-1053
In this study, comparisons are made of the crash energy performance between five grades of steel, including conventional mild steel, conventional HSS, and several grades of advanced HSS including Dual Phase 590Y. The influence of processing effects, work hardening and bake hardening, are also evaluated. Simple closed hat channels are formed by two methods, the first with minimum work hardening, the second with work and bake hardening. These hat channels are then subjected to a drop test at 25 km/hr and 50 km/hr. The load and deflection are recorded for each case and comparisons are made.
Technical Paper

Steel Processing Effects on Impact Deformation of UltraLight Steel Auto Body

2001-03-05
2001-01-1056
The objective of the research presented in this paper was to assess the influence of stamping process on crash response of UltraLight Steel Auto Body (ULSAB) [1] vehicle. Considered forming effects included thickness variations and plastic strain hardening imparted in the part forming process. The as-formed thickness and plastic strain for front crash parts were used as input data for vehicle crash analysis. Differences in structural performance between crash models with and without forming data were analyzed in order to determine the effects and feasibility of integration of forming processes and crash models.
Technical Paper

ULSAB-Advanced Vehicle Concepts - Materials

2002-03-04
2002-01-0044
Vehicle weight reduction, reduced costs and improved safety performance are the main driving forces behind material selection for automotive applications. High strength steels (HSS) have demonstrated their ability to meet these demands and consequently have been the fastest growing light-weighting material in vehicle structures for the past decade. The evolution in steel technology in recent years has produced new grades of highly formable, advanced high strength steel (AHSS) grades that will continue to meet these automotive demands into the next decade. This paper provides an example of how these advanced automotive materials have been incorporated into the ULSAB-Advance Vehicle Concept (ULSAB-AVC) and how these materials enable cost- and mass-effective solutions that satisfy the increasing crash performance requirements placed on vehicle designs.
Technical Paper

Achieving An Affordable Low Emission Steel Vehicle; An Economic Assessment of the ULSAB-AVC Program Design

2002-03-04
2002-01-0361
Vehicle weight reduction, reduced costs and improved safety performance are the main driving forces behind material selection for automotive applications. These goals are conflicting in nature and solutions will be realized by innovative design, advanced material processing and advanced materials. Advanced high strength steels are engineered materials that provide a remarkable combination of formability, strength, ductility, durability, strain-rate sensitivity and strain hardening characteristics essential to meeting the goals of automotive design. These characteristics act as enablers to cost- and mass-effective solutions. The ULSAB-AVC program demonstrates a solution to these conflicting goals and the advantages that are possible with the utilization of the advance high strength steels and provides a prediction of the material content of future body structures.
Technical Paper

Formability and Spring Back Characterization of Advanced High Strength Steel

2003-03-03
2003-01-0522
A 2001 SAE paper et al. [1,2] compared the formability aspects of six different grades of galvanealed steel [IF (270E), C-Mn (440W-1), low C - high Mn (440W-2), HSLA440 (440R), HSLA590 (590R) and DP590 (590Y)]. This study has been expanded to evaluate five additional advanced galvanealed steel grades [Low yield type DP780 (780YL), High yield type DP780 (780YM), DP980 (980Y), TRIP590 (590T), and TRIP780 (780T)]. The study presents material properties, forming characteristics in several lab tests and spring back characteristics. The study provides the actual and relative performance of these eleven steels and conclusions on the advantages these grades provide in cost-effective and mass-effective solutions to the manufacturing and performance requirements of the automotive body.
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