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Technical Paper

A detailed Mean Value Model of the exhaust system of an automotive Diesel engine

2008-01-09
2008-28-0027
Theoretical models are useful tools in the design of engine control systems, with applications that range from the design of engine layout, the definition of optimised management systems, to hardware-in-the-loop testing (HiL) and to model-based control strategies. To define theoretical models for control-oriented applications, an original library has been built up at the University of Parma for the simulation of the intake and exhaust systems of automotive turbocharged engines. Starting from this library, a Mean Value Model (MVM) of a Diesel engine, with variable-geometry turbocharger (VGT), EGR and throttle valve, has been developed for a small automotive application. In the paper the matching of the engine model with a detailed model of the exhaust system (developed by Magneti Marelli Powertrain) is presented.
Technical Paper

Upgrade of a Turbocharger Speed Measurement Algorithm Based on Acoustic Emission

2009-04-20
2009-01-1022
The present paper is about the rotational speed measurement of an automotive turbocharger, obtained starting from the analysis of acoustic emission produced by an engine, which have been acquired by a microphone placed under the vehicle hood. In the first part of the paper several upgrades to increase the overall performance of the speed extraction algorithm are presented and discussed, starting from the basic algorithm that has already demonstrated the methodology capability in a previous paper. In particular it has been considered a different signal sampling rate in order to extend the applicability of the methodology to a wider range of engines. Also a new processing procedure has been defined to increase the capability of the algorithm to tune on the frequency signal.
Technical Paper

A Mean Value Model of the Exhaust System with SCR for an Automotive Diesel Engine

2009-09-13
2009-24-0131
Nowadays requirements towards a reduction in fuel consumption and pollutant emissions of Internal Combustion Engines (ICE) keep on pushing manufacturers to improve engines performance through the enhancement of existing subsystems (e.g.: electronic fuel injection, air systems) and the introduction of specific devices (e.g.: exhaust gas recirculation systems, SCR, …). Modern systems require a combined design and application of different after-treatment devices. Mathematical models are useful tools to investigate the complexity of different system layouts, to design and to validate (HIL/SIL testing) control strategies for the after-treatment management. This study presents a mean value model of an exhaust system with SCR; it has been coupled with a common rail diesel engine combustion black box model (Neural Network based). So, dedicated models for exhaust pipes, oxidation catalyst, diesel particulate filter and selective catalytic converter are developed.
Technical Paper

Development of a Novel Approach for Non-Intrusive Closed-Loop Heat Release Estimation in Diesel Engines

2013-04-08
2013-01-0314
Over the past years, policies affecting pollutant emissions control for Diesel engines have become more and more restrictive. In order to meet such requirements, innovative combustion control methods have currently become a key factor. Several studies demonstrate that the desired pollutant emission reduction can be achieved through a closed-loop combustion control based on in-cylinder pressure processing. Nevertheless, despite the fact that cylinder pressure sensors for on-board application have been recently developed, large scale deployment of such systems is currently hindered by unsatisfactory long term reliability and high costs. Whereas both the accuracy and the reliability of pressure measurement could be improved in future years, pressure sensors would still be a considerable part of the cost of the entire engine management system.
Technical Paper

Electric Low Pressure Fuel Pump Control for Fuel Saving

2013-04-08
2013-01-0339
The trend of CO2 emission limits and the fuel saving due to the oil price increase are important drivers for engines development. The involved technologies have the aim to improve the global engine efficiency, improving combustion and minimizing energy losses. The engine auxiliary devices electrification (i.e. cooling pump or lubricating pump) is a way to reduce not useful energy consumption, because it becomes possible to control them depending on engine operating point. This kind of management can be applied to the electric low pressure fuel pump. Usually the fuel delivery is performed at the maximum flow rate and a pressure regulator discharges the exceeding fuel amount inside the rail (i.e. gasoline engine) or upstream of the high pressure pump (i.e. common rail diesel engine). At part load, especially in diesel application, the electric fuel pump flow is higher than needed for engine power generation.
Technical Paper

Exhaust Gas Turbocharger Speed Measurement Via Acoustic Emission Analysis

2008-04-14
2008-01-1007
The paper presents a non-intrusive, indirect and low-cost methodology for a real time on-board measurement of an automotive turbocharger rotational speed. In the first part of the paper the feasibility to gather information on the turbocharger speed trend is demonstrated by comparing the time-frequency analysis of the acoustic signal with the direct measurement obtained by an optical sensor facing the compressor blades, mounted in the compressor housing of a spark ignited turbocharged engine. In the second part of the paper, a real time algorithm, to be implemented in the engine control unit, is proposed. The algorithm is able to tune on the turbocharger revolution frequency and to follow it in order to extract the desired speed information. The frequency range containing the turbocharger acoustic frequency can be set utilizing a raw estimation of the compressor speed, derived by its characteristic map.
Technical Paper

Development and Validation of a Methodology for Real-Time Evaluation of Cylinder by Cylinder Torque Production Non-Uniformities

2011-09-11
2011-24-0145
Modern internal combustion engine control systems require on-board evaluation of a large number of quantities, in order to perform an efficient combustion control. The importance of optimal combustion control is mainly related to the requests for pollutant emissions reduction, but it is also crucial for noise, vibrations and harshness reduction. Engine system aging can cause significant differences between each cylinder combustion process and, consequently, an increase in vibrations and pollutant emissions. Another aspect worth mentioning is that newly developed low temperature combustion strategies (such as HCCI combustion) deliver the advantage of low engine-out NOx emissions, however, they show a high cylinder-to-cylinder variation. For these reasons, non uniformity in torque produced by the cylinders in an internal combustion engine is a very important parameter to be evaluated on board.
Technical Paper

Tuning of the Engine Control Variables of an Automotive Turbocharged Diesel Engine via Model Based Optimization

2011-09-11
2011-24-0146
The paper deals with the steady-state optimal tuning of control variables for an automotive turbocharged Diesel engine. The optimization analysis is based on an engine simulation model, composed of a control oriented model of turbocharger integrated with a predictive multi-zone combustion model, which allows accounting for the impact of control variables on engine performance, NOx and soot emissions and turbine outlet temperature. This latter strongly affects conversion efficiency of after treatment devices therefore its estimation is of great interest for both control and simulation of tailpipe emissions. The proposed modeling structure is aimed to support the engine control design for common-rail turbocharged Diesel engines with multiple injections, where the large number of control parameters requires a large experimental tuning effort.
Technical Paper

Neural Network Based Models for Virtual NOx Sensing of Compression Ignition Engines

2011-09-11
2011-24-0157
The paper focuses on the experimental identification and validation of different neural networks for virtual sensing of NOx emissions in combustion compression ignition engines (CI). A comparison of several neural network architectures (NN, TDNN and RNN) has been carried out in order to evaluate precision and generalization in dynamic prediction of NOx formation. Furthermore the model complexity (number and types of inputs, neuron and layer number, etc.) has been considered to allow a future ECU implementation and on line training. Suited training procedures and experimental tests are proposed to improve the models. Several measurements of NOx emissions have been performed through different devices applied to the outlet of a EURO 5 Common Rail diesel engine with EGR. The accuracy of the developed models is assessed by comparing simulated and experimental trajectories for a wide range of operating conditions.
Technical Paper

Diesel Engine Acoustic Emission Analysis for Combustion Control

2012-04-16
2012-01-1338
Future regulations on pollutant emissions will impose a drastic cut on Diesel engines out-emissions. For this reason, the development of closed-loop combustion control algorithms has become a key factor in modern Diesel engine management systems. Diesel engines out-emissions can be reduced through a highly premixed combustion portion in low and medium load operating conditions. Since low-temperature premixed combustions are very sensitive to in-cylinder thermal conditions, the first aspect to be considered in newly developed Diesel engine control strategies is the control of the center of combustion. In order to achieve the target center of combustion, conventional combustion control algorithms correct the measured value varying main injection timing. A further reduction in engine-out emissions can be obtained applying an appropriate injection strategy.
Technical Paper

Artificial Intelligence Methodologies for Oxygen Virtual Sensing at Diesel Engine Intake

2012-04-16
2012-01-1153
In the last decades, worldwide automotive regulations induced the industry to dramatically increase the application of electronics in the control of the engine and of the pollutant emissions reduction systems. Besides the need of engine control, suitable fault diagnosis tools had also to be developed, in order to fulfil OBD-II and E-OBD requirements. At present, one of the problems in the development of Diesel engines is represented by the achievement of an ever more sharp control on the systems used for the pollutant emission reduction. In particular, as far as NOx gas is concerned, EGR systems are mature and widely used, but an ever higher efficiency in terms of emissions abatement, requires to determine as better as possible the actual oxygen content in the charge at the engine intake manifold, also in dynamic conditions, i.e. in transient engine operation.
Technical Paper

A Comprehensive Powertrain Model to Evaluate the Benefits of Electric Turbo Compound (ETC) in Reducing CO2 Emissions from Small Diesel Passenger Cars

2014-04-01
2014-01-1650
In the last years the automotive industry has been involved in the development and implementation of CO2 reducing concepts such as the engines downsizing, stop/start systems as well as more costly full hybrid solutions and, more recently, waste heat recovery technologies. These latter include ThermoElectric Generator (TEG), Rankine cycle and Electric Turbo Compound (ETC) that have been practically implemented on few heavy-duty application but have not been proved yet as effective and affordable solutions for the automotive industry. The paper deals with the analysis of opportunities and challenges of the Electric Turbo Compound for automotive light-duty engines. In the ETC concept the turbine-compressor shaft is connected to an electric machine, which can work either as generator or motor. In the former case the power can satisfy the vehicle electrical demand to drive the auxiliaries or stored in the batteries.
Technical Paper

Estimation of the Engine Thermal State by in-Cylinder Pressure Measurement in Automotive Diesel Engines

2015-04-14
2015-01-1623
International regulations continuously restrict the standards for the exhaust emissions from automotive engines. In order to comply with these requirements, innovative control and diagnosis systems are needed. In this scenario the application of methodologies based on the in-cylinder pressure measurement finds widespread applications. Indeed, almost all engine thermodynamic variables useful for either control or diagnosis can be derived from the in-cylinder pressure. Apart for improving the control accuracy, the availability of the in-cylinder pressure signal might also allow reducing the number of existing sensors on-board, thus lowering the equipment costs and the engine wiring complexity. The paper focuses on the detection of the engine thermal state, which is fundamental to achieve suitable control of engine combustion and after-treatment devices.
Technical Paper

Engine Acoustic Emission Used as a Control Input: Applications to Diesel Engines

2016-04-05
2016-01-0613
The need for strategies that allow managing combustion in an adaptive way has recently widely increased. Especially Diesel engines aimed for clean combustion require a precise control of the combustion outputs. Acoustic emission of internal combustion engines contains a lot of information related to engine behavior and working conditions. Mechanical noise and combustion noise are usually the main contributions to the noise produced by an engine. Combustion noise in particular can be used as an indicator of the combustion that is taking place inside the combustion chamber and therefore as a reference for the control strategy. This work discusses the correlations existing between in cylinder combustion and the acoustic emission radiated by the engine and presents a possible approach to use this signal in the engine management system for control purposes.
Technical Paper

Optical Investigations on a Multiple Spark Ignition System for Lean Engine Operation

2016-04-05
2016-01-0711
The paper reports on the optical investigation of a multiple spark ignition system carried out in a closed vessel in inert gas, and in an optical access engine in firing condition. The ignition system features a plug-top ignition coil with integrated electronics which is capable of multi-spark discharges (MSD) with short dwell time. First, the ignition system has been characterized in constant ambient conditions, at different pressure levels. The profile of the energy released by the spark and the cumulated value has been determined by measuring the fundamental electrical parameters. A high speed camera has been used to visualize the time evolution of the electric arc discharge to highlight its shape and position variability. The multiple spark system has then been mounted on an optical access engine with port fuel injection (PFI) to study the combustion characteristics in lean conditions with single and multiple discharges.
Technical Paper

Remote Combustion Sensing Methodology for PCCI and Dual-Fuel Combustion Control

2015-09-06
2015-24-2420
The increasing request for pollutant emissions reduction spawned a great deal of research in the field of innovative combustion methodologies, that allow obtaining a significant reduction both in particulate matter and NOx emissions. Unfortunately, due to their nature, these innovative combustion strategies are very sensitive to in-cylinder thermal conditions. Therefore, in order to obtain a stable combustion, a closed-loop combustion control methodology is needed. Prior research has demonstrated that a closed-loop combustion control strategy can be based on the real-time analysis of in-cylinder pressure trace, that provides important information about the combustion process, such as Start (SOC) and Center of combustion (CA50), pressure peak location and torque delivered by each cylinder. Nevertheless, cylinder pressure sensors on-board installation is still uncommon, due to problems related to unsatisfactory measurement long term reliability and cost.
Technical Paper

Modeling and Optimization of Organic Rankine Cycle for Waste Heat Recovery in Automotive Engines

2016-04-05
2016-01-0207
In the last years, the research effort of the automotive industry has been mainly focused on the reduction of CO2 and pollutants emissions. In this scenario, concepts such as the engines downsizing, stop/start systems as well as more costly full hybrid solutions and, more recently, Waste Heat Recovery technologies have been proposed. These latter include Thermo-Electric Generator (TEG), Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) and Electric Turbo-Compound (ETC) that have been practically implemented on few heavy-duty applications but have not been proved yet as effective and affordable solutions for passenger cars. The paper deals with modeling of ORC power plant for simulation analyses aimed at evaluating the opportunities and challenges of its application for the waste heat recovery in a compact car, powered by a turbocharged SI engine.
Technical Paper

Enhanced Multi-Zone Model for Medium Pressure Injection Spray and Fuel-Wall Impingement in Light-Duty Diesel Engines

2015-09-06
2015-24-2398
Nowadays the high competition reached by the automotive market forces Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) towards innovative solutions. Strict emission standards and fuel economy targets make the work hard to be accomplished. Therefore modern engines feature complex architecture and embed new devices for Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR), turbocharging (e.g. multi-stage compressors), gas after-treatment (e.g. the Selective Catalyst Reduction (SCR)) and fuel injection (either high or low pressure). In this context the Engine Management System (EMS) plays a fundamental role to optimize engine operation. The paper deals with fuel spray and combustion simulation by a multi-zone phenomenological model aimed at the steady-state optimal tuning of the injection pattern.
Technical Paper

Thermal Management Strategies for SCR After Treatment Systems

2013-09-08
2013-24-0153
While the Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) is actually a quasi-standard equipment in the European Diesel passenger cars market, an interesting solution to fulfill NOx emission limits for the next EU 6 legislation is the application of a Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) system on the exhaust line, to drastically reduce NOx emissions. In this context, one of the main issues is the performance of the SCR system during cold start and warm up phases of the engine. The exhaust temperature is too low to allow thermal activation of the reactor and, consequently, to promote high conversion efficiency and significant NOx concentration reduction. This is increasingly evident the smaller the engine displacement, because of its lower exhaust system temperature (reduced gross power while producing the same net power, i.e., higher efficiency).
Technical Paper

Development of an Urea Supply System for the SCR Catalyst

2013-01-09
2013-26-0047
The increase in the fuel price and more stringent regulations on greenhouse gases (CO2) make the engine compression ignition technology even more attractive in the context of internal combustion engines. This is because the modern turbocharged direct injection engines, with the common rail fuel system, are characterized by high combustion efficiency and power density, that make them particularly suitable both for applications on and off road. On the other hand, the compression ignition engines are subject to a heavy technological developments to meet the more stringent regulations on emissions of exhaust pollutants, especially PM and NOx. The adopted technologies have two main approaches, on the combustion and on the exhaust gas aftertreatment. The measures applied for combustion can reduce emissions, but with the risk of penalizing the other engine performances, such as noise, power output and fuel consumption.
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