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Standard

ELECTROMAGNETIC TESTING BY EDDY CURRENT METHODS

1991-03-01
HISTORICAL
J425_199103
The purpose of this SAE Information Report is to provide general information relative to the nature and use of eddy current techniques for nondestructive testing. The document is not intended to provide detailed technical information but to serve as an introduction to the principles and capabilities of eddy current testing, and as a guide to more extensive references listed in Section 2.
Standard

ELECTROPLATING AND RELATED FINISHES

1985-02-01
CURRENT
J474_198502
Electroplating is a process whereby an object is coated with one or more relatively thin, tightly adherent layers of one or more metals. It is accomplished by placing the object to be coated on a plating rack or a fixture, or in a basket or in a rotating container in such a manner that a suitable current may flow through it, and then immersing it in a series of solutions and rinses in planned sequence. The advantage to be gained by electroplating may be considerable; broadly speaking, the process is used when it is desired to endow the basis material (selected for cost, material conservation, and physical property reasons) with surface properties it does not possess. It should be noted that although electroplating is the most widely used process for applying metals to a substrate, they may also be applied by spraying, vacuum deposition, cladding, hot dipping, chemical reduction, mechanical plating, etc.
Standard

ANODIZED ALUMINUM AUTOMOTIVE PARTS

1985-02-01
CURRENT
J399_198502
Automotive parts can be fabricated from either coiled sheet, flat sheet or extruded shapes. Alloy selection is governed by finish requirements, forming characteristics, and mechanical properties. Bright anodizing alloys 5657 and 52521 sheet provide a high luster and are preferred for trim which can be formed from an intermediate temper, such as H25. Bright anodizing alloy 5457 is used for parts which require high elongation and a fully annealed ("0") temper. Alloy 6463 is a medium strength bright anodizing extrusion alloy; Alloy X7016 is a high strength bright anodizing extrusion alloy primarily suited for bumper applications. To satisfy anti-glare requirements for certain trim applications, sheet alloy 5205 and extrusion alloy 6063 are capable of providing the desired low-gloss anodized finish.
Standard

Nondestructive Tests

2017-12-20
CURRENT
J358_201712
Nondestructive tests are those tests which detect factors related to the serviceability or quality of a part or material without limiting its usefulness. Material defects such as surface cracks, laps, pits, internal inclusions, bursts, shrink, seam, hot tears, and composition analysis can be detected. Sometimes their dimensions and exact location can be determined. Such tests can usually be made rapidly. Processing results such as hardness, case depth, wall thickness, ductility, decarburization, cracks, apparent tensile strength, grain size, and lack of weld penetration or fusion may be detectable and measurable. Service results such as corrosion and fatigue cracking may be detected and measured by nondestructive test methods. In many cases, imperfections can be automatically detected so that parts or materials can be classified.
Standard

ELECTROPLATE REQUIREMENTS FOR DECORATIVE CHROMIUM DEPOSITS ON ZINC BASE MATERIALS USED FOR EXTERIOR ORNAMENTATION

1991-06-01
HISTORICAL
J1837_199106
This SAE Standard covers the physical and performance requirements for electrodeposited copper, nickel, and chromium deposits on exterior ornamentation fabricated from die cast zinc alloys (SAE J468 alloys 903 and 925), and wrought zinc strip (ASTM B 69). This type of coating is designed to provide a high degree of corrosion resistance for automotive, truck, marine, and farm usage where a bright, decorative finish is desired.
Standard

Electroplate Requirements for Decorative Chromium Deposits on Zinc Base Materials Used for Exterior Ornamentation

2017-12-20
CURRENT
J1837_201712
This SAE Standard covers the physical and performance requirements for electrodeposited copper, nickel, and chromium deposits on exterior ornamentation fabricated from die cast zinc alloys (SAE J468 alloys 903 and 925), and wrought zinc strip (ASTM B 69). This type of coating is designed to provide a high degree of corrosion resistance for automotive, truck, marine, and farm usage where a bright, decorative finish is desired.
Standard

Zinc Die Casting Alloys

2017-12-20
CURRENT
J469_201712
Because of the drastic chilling involved in die casting and the fact that the solid solubilities of both aluminum and copper in zinc change with temperature, these alloys are subject to some aging changes, one of which is a dimensional change. Both of the alloys undergo a slight shrinkage after casting, which at room temperature is about two-thirds complete in five weeks. It is possible to accelerate this shrinkage by a stabilizing anneal, after which no further changes occur. The recommended stabilizing anneal is 3 to 6 h at 100 °C (212 °F), or 5 to 10 h at 85 °C (185 °F), or 10 to 20 h at 70 °C (158 °F). The time in each case is measured from the time at which the castings reach the annealing temperature. The parts may be air cooled after annealing. Such a treatment will cause a shrinkage (0.0004 in per in) of about two-thirds of the total, and the remaining shrinkage will occur at room temperature during the subsequent few weeks.
Standard

ZINC DIE CASTING ALLOYS

1989-01-01
HISTORICAL
J469_198901
Because of the drastic chilling involved in die casting and the fact that the solid solubilities of both aluminum and copper in zinc change with temperature, these alloys are subject to some aging changes, one of which is a dimensional change. Both of the alloys undergo a slight shrinkage after casting, which at room temperature is about two-thirds complete in five weeks. It is possible to accelerate this shrinkage by a stabilizing anneal, after which no further changes occur. The recommended stabilizing anneal is 3 to 6 h at 100 °C (212 °F), or 5 to 10 h at 85 °C (185 °F), or 10 to 20 h at 70 °C (158 °F). The time in each case is measured from the time at which the castings reach the annealing temperature. The parts may be air cooled after annealing. Such a treatment will cause a shrinkage (0.0004 in per in) of about two-thirds of the total, and the remaining shrinkage will occur at room temperature during the subsequent few weeks.
Standard

Chemical Compositions of SAE Wrought Stainless Steels

1998-06-01
HISTORICAL
J405_199806
The chemical composition of standard types of wrought stainless steels are listed in ASTM Specification A240. The UNS 20000 series designates nickel-chromium manganese, corrosion resistant types that are nonhardenable by thermal treatment. The UNS 30000 series are nickel-chromium, corrosion resistant steels, nonhardenable by thermal treatment. The UNS 40000 however, includes both a hardenable, martensitic chromium steel and nonhardenable, ferritic, chromium steel. Reference to SAE J412 is suggested for general information and usage of these types of materials. See Table 1.
Standard

Chemical Compositions of SAE Wrought Stainless Steels

2018-01-09
CURRENT
J405_201801
The chemical composition of standard types of wrought stainless steels are listed in ASTM Specification A240. The UNS 20000 series designates nickel-chromium manganese, corrosion resistant types that are nonhardenable by thermal treatment. The UNS 30000 series are nickel-chromium, corrosion resistant steels, nonhardenable by thermal treatment. The UNS 40000 however, includes both a hardenable, martensitic chromium steel and nonhardenable, ferritic, chromium steel. Reference to SAE J412 is suggested for general information and usage of these types of materials. See Table 1.
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