Refine Your Search

Search Results

Technical Paper

A Market-Weighted Description of Low-Beam Headlighting Patterns in Europe

2001-03-05
2001-01-0857
This study was designed to provide photometric information about current European low-beam headlamps. The sample included 20 low-beam headlamps manufactured for use on the 20 best-selling passenger vehicles for calendar year 1999 in 17 European countries. These 20 vehicles represent 47% of all vehicles sold in these countries. The lamps were purchased directly from vehicle dealerships, and photometered in 0.25° steps from 45° left to 45° right, and from 5° down to 7° up. The photometric information for each lamp was weighted by 1999 sales figures for the corresponding vehicle. The results are presented both in tabular form for the 25th-percentile, the median (50th-percentile), and the 75th-percentile luminous intensities, as well as in graphical form (for the median luminous intensities).
Technical Paper

Fog Lamps: Frequency of Installation and Nature of Use

1997-02-24
970657
The goal of this study was to provide information about the frequency of installation and use of fog lamps. Two surveys were performed. In the first one, installation of fog lamps was estimated by a survey of parked vehicles in two iarge shopping centers. The second survey studied the usage of fog lamps during daytime and nighttime, under clear, rainy, or foggy conditions. In this survey, an observer in a moving vehicle noted the types of lamps that were energized on the fronts of oncoming vehicles, and whether fog lamps were installed at all. The main findings are: (1) The best estimate of the current frequency of installation of fog lamps in southeast Michigan is about 13%. (2) During daytime, the usage of fog lamps increased with deterioration in atmospheric conditions, with the usage reaching 50% of all installed fog lamps during moderate-to-heavy fog.
Technical Paper

Effects of Large-Radius Convex Rearview Mirrors on Driver Perception

1997-02-24
970910
The U.S. currently requires that reai-view mirrors installed as original equipment in the center and driver-side positions be flat. There has recently been interest in using nonplanar mirrors in those positions, including possibly mirrors with large radii (over 2 m). This has provided additional motivation to understand the effects of mirror curvature on drivers' perceptions of distance and speed. This paper addresses this issue by (1) reviewing the concepts from perceptual theory that are most relevant to predicting and understanding how drivers judge distance in nonplanar rearview mirrors, and (2) reviewing the past empirical studies that have manipulated mirror curvature and measured some aspect of distance perception. The effects of mirror curvature on cues for distance perception do not lead to simple predictions. The most obvious model is one based on visual angle, according to which convex mirrors should generally lead to overestimation of distances.
Technical Paper

Driver Perceptual Adaptation to Nonplanar Rearview Mirrors

1996-02-01
960791
This study examined perceptual adaptation to nonplanar (spherical convex and aspheric) rearview mirrors. Subjects made magnitude estimates of the distance to a car seen in a rearview mirror. Three different mirrors were used: plane, aspheric (with a large spherical section having a radius of 1400 mm), and simple convex (with a radius of 1000 mm). Previous research relevant to perceptual adaptation to nonplanar mirrors was reviewed. It was argued that, in spite of some cases of explicit interest in the process of learning to use nonplanar mirrors, previous research has not adequately addressed the possibility of perceptual adaptation. The present experiment involved three phases: (1) a pretest phase in which subjects made distance judgments but received no feedback, (2) a training phase in which they made judgments and did receive feedback, and (3) a posttest phase with the same procedure as the pretest phase.
Technical Paper

A Field Study of Distance Perception with Large-Radius Convex Rearview Mirrors

1998-02-23
980916
One of the primary reasons that FMVSS 111 currently requires flat rearview mirrors as original equipment on the driver's side of passenger cars is a concern that convex mirrors might reduce safety by causing drivers to overestimate the distances to following vehicles. Several previous studies of the effects of convex rearview mirrors have indicated that they do cause overestimations of distance, but of much lower magnitude than would be expected based on the mirrors' levels of image minification and the resulting visual angles experienced by drivers. Previous studies have investigated mirrors with radiuses of curvature up to 2000 mm. The present empirical study was designed to investigate the effects of mirrors with larger radiuses (up to 8900 mm). Such results are of interest because of the possible use of large radiuses in some aspheric mirror designs, and because of the information they provide about the basic mechanisms by which convex mirrors affect distance perception.
Technical Paper

On-the-Road Visual Performance with Electrochromic Rearview Mirrors

1995-02-01
950600
This study was part of a series of studies on variable-reflectance rearview mirrors. Previous work included laboratory studies of human visual performance, field collection of photometric data, and mathematical modeling of the visual benefits of variable-reflectance mirrors. We extended that work in this study by collecting photometric and human-performance data while subjects drove in actual traffic. Three mirror conditions were investigated: (1) fixed-reflectance mirrors in the center and driver-side positions, (2) a variable-reflectance mirror in the center with a fixed-reflectance mirror on the driver side, and (3) variable-reflectance mirrors in both positions. The fixed and variable reflectivities were produced by the same mirrors by overriding the circuitry that normally controlled reflectance in the variable mode.
Technical Paper

Evaluation of the SAE J1735 Draft Proposal for a Harmonized Low-Beam Headlighting Pattern

1995-02-01
950597
This study evaluated the SAE J1735 Draft Proposal for a low-beam headlighting pattern in relation to the current standards in the U.S., Europe, and Japan. The approach consisted of the following steps: (1) identifying a set of 15 important visual performance functions (including seeing and glare) for low-beam headlamps; (2) defining the relevant geometry relative to the visual performance functions; (3) setting criterion values of illumination for each of the visual performance functions based on the available empirical data; and (4) evaluating the standards relative to the criterion values by using the worst-allowed-case approach (evaluating the minima specified by the standards for seeing functions, and the maxima for glare functions). The results indicate that the SAE J1735 Draft Proposal tended to require better performance than the current U.S., European, and Japanese standards.
Technical Paper

A Market-Weighted Description of Low-Beam Headlighting Patterns in the U.S.

1998-02-23
980317
This study was designed to provide photometric information about current U.S. low-beam headlamps. The sample included 35 low-beam headlamps manufactured for use on the 23 best-selling passenger cars, light trucks, and vans for model year 1997. These 23 vehicles represent 45% of all vehicles sold in the U.S. The lamps were purchased directly from vehicle dealerships, and photometered in 0.5° steps from 45° left to 45° right, and from 5° down to 7° up. The photometric information for each lamp was weighted by 1997 sales figures for the corresponding vehicle. The results are presented both in tabular form for the 25th-percentile, the median (50th-percentile), and the 75th-percentile luminous intensities, as well as in graphical form (for the median luminous intensities, and median illuminance values reaching the road surface). The information is presented in aggregate form, as well as broken down by vehicle type and light source.
Technical Paper

The Relative Importance of Horizontal and Vertical Aim of Low-Beam Headlamps

1994-03-01
940640
This study evaluated the relative effects of horizontal and vertical misaim of low-beam headlamps. The approach involved analyzing light-output matrices of 150 production low beams, manufactured for sale in the U.S., Europe, and Japan. The specific analysis involved computing, for 225 locations in the central part of each beam pattern, the ratios of nominal intensity and intensity for vertical and horizontal misaim of up to 1.5°. The ratios greater than 1 log unit were considered to be of practical significance in terms of changes in visual performance and discomfort glare, and those greater than 0.5 log unit of likely significance. Only changes relative to visual performance and glare under nominal aim were considered; absolute levels were not examined. Furthermore, simultaneous horizontal and vertical misaims were not considered.
Technical Paper

Quantifying the Benefits of Variable Reflectance Rearview Mirrors

1994-03-01
940641
We collected photometric data, concerning the simultaneous levels of rearview mirror glare and luminance of the forward scene, in order to characterize the night driving environment for rearview mirrors. An instrumented vehicle was used to collect photometric data for each combination of three road types (urban, expressway, and rural) with two pavement conditions (dry and wet). We then used these data to quantify the benefits of variable-reflectance rearview mirrors relative to (1) fixed-reflectance mirrors, and (2) two-level prism mirrors. The performance of the various types of mirrors was quantified in terms of a figure of merit. The figure of merit is simply the percentage of the time that all of three mirror-performance measures are met: (1) discomfort glare, (2) forward visibility, and (3) rearward visibility.
Technical Paper

Nighttime Effectiveness of Rearview Mirrors: Driver Attitudes and Behaviors

1990-02-01
900567
The availability of new technology for antiglare rearview mirrors has increased the importance of understanding how people react to glare from rearview mirrors and what the tradeoff between visibility and glare reduction should be. We conducted a survey of attitudes toward and use of prism mirrors to determine what guidance that information might offer for future mirror design. The major findings are that (1) there is a high level of awareness and use of prism mirrors, but (2) the benefits obtainable from the antiglare setting of the prism mirror are not fully utilized. The reasons for this suboptimal use appear to be (1) a lower than desirable level of reflectivity on the antiglare setting, and (2) failure to make the required manual adjustments of the mirror.
Technical Paper

Rearward Vision, Driver Confidence, and Discomfort Glare Using an Electrochromic Rearview Mirror

1991-02-01
910822
Electrochromic rearview mirrors can provide continuous levels of reflectivity and unobtrusive, automatic control. The availability of this technology has increased the importance of understanding how to select the best level of reflectivity for a given set of lighting conditions. For night driving with glare from following headlights, the best reflectivity level will always depend on a tradeoff among several variables. This study was designed to help clarify what variables are important and how they should be quantified. Twenty subjects, 10 younger and 10 older, performed a number of visual tasks while viewing stimuli through an electrochromic rearview mirror. Subjects were seated in an automobile mockup in a laboratory, and the reflectivity level of the mirror was changed before each of a series of discrete trials. On each trial, subjects saw reflected in the mirror a visual-acuity stimulus and a glare source of varying intensity.
Technical Paper

Rearview Mirror Reflectivity and the Quality of Distance Information Available to Drivers

1993-03-01
930721
In two experiments, we examined the possibility that rearview mirror reflectivity influences drivers' perceptions of the distance to following vehicles. In the first experiment, subjects made magnitude estimates of the distance to a vehicle seen in a variable-reflectance rearview mirror. Reflectivity had a significant effect on the central tendency of subjects' judgments: distance estimates were greater when reflectivity was lower. There was no effect of reflectivity on the variability of judgments. In the second experiment, subjects were required to decide, under time pressure, whether a vehicle viewed in a variable-reflectance rearview mirror had been displaced toward them or away from them when they were shown two views of the vehicle in quick succession. We measured the speed and accuracy of their responses. Mirror reflectivity did not affect speed or accuracy, but it did cause a bias in the type of errors that subjects made.
Technical Paper

Visual Aiming of European and U.S. Low-Beam Headlamps

1992-02-01
920814
This study evaluated the effect of the sharpness of the cutoff (the transition between the lighter and darker portions of the beam) of low-beam headlamps on visual vertical aiming. Out of ten lamps tested, seven had a U.S.-type beam pattern and three had a European-type beam pattern. Twenty younger and middle-aged subjects of both sexes, along with an experienced lamp aimer, were asked to adjust the vertical aim of the lamps in such a way that the cutoff of the beam was coincident with a horizontal line on a vertical surface. The subjects were instructed to make the alignment using the illumination gradient to the right of vertical for the U.S.-type lamps and to the left of vertical for the European-type lamps. Each person aimed each lamp ten times. There are two main results. First, the location of the perceived cutoff was generally near the location of the maximum contrast between adjacent vertical parts of the beam pattern.
Technical Paper

Rearview Mirror Reflectivity and the Tradeoff Between Forward and Rearward Seeing

1992-02-01
920404
In a laboratory study and in a mathematical modeling effort, we evaluated the effects of rearview mirror reflectivity on older and younger subjects' seeing ability under conditions designed to simulate night driving with headlamp glare present in the mirror. Rearview mirror reflectivity was varied while observers were required to detect both rearward stimuli seen through the mirror and forward stimuli seen directly. Lower reflectivity resulted in improved ability to see forward and reduced ability to see to the rear. The reduction in ability to see to the rear was much larger than the improvement in forward seeing. The results of the modeling and the laboratory study were in broad agreement, although there were some significant discrepancies. Although the present results cannot be used to make specific recommendations for rearview mirror reflectivity, they suggest that the reduction in rearward vision as reflectivity is lowered should be considered carefully.
Technical Paper

Motor Vehicle Forward Lighting

1983-02-01
830567
This paper surveys the literature on motor vehicle headlighting and its influence on the ability of drivers to avoid accidents. The review identifies the key relationships between headlamp design characteristics and driver and environmental factors. The major safety problems associated with headlighting are discussed, and issues needing the attention of the research community are identified.
Technical Paper

Market-Weighted Trends in the Design Attributes of Headlamps in the U.S.

2008-04-14
2008-01-0670
This report provides updated information regarding the market-weighted prevalence of various headlamp design attributes in the U.S. and a summary of recent trends for these design attributes. The main findings were as follows: (1) there was a general transition from dual-filament light sources in 1997 to single-filament sources in 2007; (2) the preferred optics changed from lens-based in 1997 to mostly reflector-based optics in 2007; and (3) while mechanical aim was the most frequently specified aiming method in 1997, the 2007 sample made nearly exclusive use of visual/optical aiming (with visual/optical right side as the most common specific type).
Technical Paper

Distance Cues and Fields of View in Rear Vision Systems

2006-04-03
2006-01-0947
The effects of image size on perceived distance have been of concern for convex rearview mirrors as well as camera-based rear vision systems. We suggest that the importance of image size is limited to cases-such as current rearview mirrors-in which the field of view is small. With larger, richer fields of view it is likely that other distance cues will dominate image size, thereby substantially diminishing the concern that distortions of size will result in distortions of distance perception. We report results from an experiment performed in a driving simulator, with static simulated rearward images, in which subjects were asked to make judgments about the distance to a rearward vehicle. The images showed a field of view substantially wider than provided by any of the individual rearview mirrors in current systems. The field of view was 38 degrees wide and was presented on displays that were either 16.7 or 8.5 degrees wide, thus minifying images by factors of 0.44 or 0.22.
Technical Paper

The Role of Binocular Information for Distance Perception in Rear-Vision Systems

2001-03-05
2001-01-0322
New developments in the use of two-dimensional displays to supplement driver vision have made it more important to understand the roles that various distance cues play in driver perception of distance in more conventional ways of viewing the road, including direct vision and viewing through rearview mirrors. The current study was designed to investigate the role of binocular distance cues for perception of distance in rearview mirrors. In a field experiment, we obtained data to estimate the importance of binocular cues for distance judgments under conditions representative of real-world traffic. The results indicate that, although binocular cues are potentially available to drivers, these cues probably play little or no role in distance judgments in rearview mirrors in normal driving situations.
Technical Paper

Quantifying the Direct Field of View when Using Driver-Side Rearview Mirrors

1999-03-01
1999-01-0656
In a static field study we tested drivers’ abilities to detect vehicles in the periphery of their direct fields of view while they gazed toward the driver-side exterior rearview mirror of a passenger car. The results indicate that both younger and older drivers can detect vehicles with reasonable efficiency even in far peripheral vision. However, the results also indicate that using peripheral vision entails a cost in terms of lengthened reaction time. Although that cost seems modest in comparison with the normal durations of glances to rearview mirrors and of direct looks to the rear, it is not clear from this study alone how the reaction time cost might influence the scanning strategies that drivers actually use in driving. The present study was oriented more to testing drivers’ basic visual capabilities than to outlining their overall strategies.
X