Refine Your Search

Search Results

Technical Paper

Ion Current in a Spark Ignition Engine using Negative Polarity on Center Electrode

2007-04-16
2007-01-0646
Most of the previous research on flame ionization in spark ignition engines applied positive polarity on the spark plug center electrode, referred to as positively biased probe. In this paper an investigation is made to determine the characteristics of the ion current signal with negatively biased probe. The factors that contribute to the second ion current peak, reported to be missing with negative polarity, are investigated. Experiments were conducted on a research single-cylinder, spark ignition engine and the negative polarity is applied by a SmartFire Plasma Ignition system. The effect of different spark plug designs and engine operating parameters on the amplitude and timing of each of the two ion current peaks is determined. The results indicated that, with negative polarity, the cathode area is one of the main factors that contribute to the amplitude of the ion current signal, particularly the second peak.
Technical Paper

Engine Friction Model for Transient Operation of Turbocharged, Common Rail Diesel Engines

2007-04-16
2007-01-1460
The simulation of I.C. Engines operation, especially during transients, requires a fairly accurate estimation of the internal mechanical losses of the engine. The paper presents generic friction models for the main friction components of the engine (piston-ring-liner assembly, bearings and valve train), considering geometry of the engine parts and peculiarities of the corresponding lubrication processes. Separate models for the mechanical losses introduced by the injection system, oil and water pumps are also developed. All models are implemented as SIMULINK modules in a complex engine simulation code developed in SIMULINK and capable to simulate both steady state and transient operating conditions. Validation is achieved by comparison with measurements made on a four cylinder, common rail diesel engine, on a test bench capable to run controlled transients.
Journal Article

Impact of A/F Ratio on Ion Current Features Using Spark Plug with Negative Polarity

2008-04-14
2008-01-1005
The increasing interest and requirement for improved electronic engine control during the last few decades, has led to the implementation of several different sensor technologies. The process of utilizing the spark plug as a combustion probe to monitor the different combustion related parameters such as knock, misfire, Ignition timing, and air-fuel ratio have been the subject of research for some time now. The air-fuel ratio is one of the most important engine operating parameters that has an impact on the combustion process, engine-out emissions, fuel economy, indicated mean effective pressure and exhaust gas composition and temperature. Furthermore, air-fuel ratio affects the ion produced during flame kernel initiation and post flame propagation. In this paper, an investigation is made to determine the effect of air-fuel ratio on ion current, using gasoline and methane under different spark plug designs and engine operating conditions.
Technical Paper

Diesel Engine Diagnosis Based on Analysis of the Crankshaft's Speed Variation

1998-10-19
982540
The variation of the crankshaft's speed is influenced by the action of the cylinders and shall reflect the contribution of each cylinder to the total engine output. At the same time, the speed variation is influenced by the torsional stiffness of the cranks, the mass moments of inertia of the reciprocating mechanisms and the average speed and load of the engine. As the result, the variation of angular motion of the crankshaft is complex, each particular influence changing its importance as speed and load are modified. The diagnostic method presented in the paper is based on the analysis of the amplitudes and phases of the lowest harmonic orders of the measured speed and is capable to determine the average Indicated Mean Effective Pressure (IMEP), to detect nonuniformities in cylinder operation and to identify the faulty cylinder(s).
Technical Paper

Determination of the Gas-Pressure Torque of a Multicylinder Engine from Measurements of the Crankshaft's Speed Variation

1998-02-23
980164
The local variation of the crankshaft's speed in a multicylinder engine is determined by the resultant gas-pressure torque and the torsional deformation of the crankshaft. Under steady-state operation, the crankshaft's speed has a quasi-periodic variation and its harmonic components may be obtained by a Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT). Based on a lumped-mass model of the shafting, correlations are established between the harmonic components of the speed variation and the corresponding components of the engine torque. These correlations are used to calculate the gas-pressure torque or the indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP) from measurements of the crankshaft's speed.
Technical Paper

Simplified Elasto-Hydrodynamic Friction Model of the Cam-Tappet Contact

2003-03-03
2003-01-0985
The paper analyses the particularities of the lubricating conditions at the contact between the cam and a flat tappet in the valve train of an internal combustion engine and develops a method for the calculation of the friction force. The existing lubrication models show the predominance of the entraining speed and oil viscosity on the thickness of the oil film entrapped between cam and tappet, predicting a very small value (less than 0.1 μm) of the oil film thickness (OFT). The oil viscosity increases exponentially with pressure in the Hertzian contact, determining non-Newtonian behavior of the oil in the contact zone. Using the model developed by Greenwood and Tripp [11] for the contact of two rough surfaces and the Eyring model [2] for the oil it is shown that non-Newtonian behavior of the oil prevails and that the OFT plays a secondary role on the friction force.
Technical Paper

Experimental Analysis of Dynamics and Friction in Valve Train Systems

2002-03-04
2002-01-0484
The paper analyses the friction in the valve train of an internal combustion engine trying to separate the contribution of the different components to the total friction losses in the valve train. The measurements are performed on a running engine in order to avoid extraneous factors introduced by simulating rigs. The experimental engine is instrumented with strain gauge bridges on the rocker arm, the push rod and the camshaft to measure forces and moments acting on these components. Original techniques are developed to isolate and determine the friction forces between the valve stem and its guide, the friction force in the rocker arm bearing and the combined friction between cam/tappet and tappet/bore. It was found that the friction in the rocker arm bearing never reaches hydrodynamic conditions and that the friction coefficient between cam and tappet reduces with an increase in the engine speed.
Technical Paper

A New Ignition Delay Formulation Applied to Predict Misfiring During Cold Starting of Diesel Engines

2000-03-06
2000-01-1184
A new formulation is developed for the ignition delay (ID) in diesel engines to account for the effect of piston motion on the global autoignition reaction rates. A differentiation is made between the IDe measured in engines and IDv, measured in constant volume vessels. In addition, a method is presented to determine the coefficients of the IDe correlation from actual engine experimental data. The new formulation for IDe is applied to predict the misfiring cycles during the cold starting of diesel engines at different low ambient temperatures. The predictions are compared with experimental results obtained on a multi-cylinder heavy-duty diesel engine.
Technical Paper

Direct Visualization of High Pressure Diesel Spray and Engine Combustion

1999-10-25
1999-01-3496
An experimental study was carried out to visualize the spray and combustion inside an AVL single-cylinder research diesel engine converted for optical access. The injection system was a hydraulically-amplified electronically-controlled unit injector capable of high injection pressure up to 180 MPa and injection rate shaping. The injection characteristics were carefully characterized with injection rate meter and with spray visualization in high-pressure chamber. The intake air was supplied by a compressor and heated with a 40kW electrical heater to simulate turbocharged intake condition. In addition to injection and cylinder pressure measurements, the experiment used 16-mm high-speed movie photography to directly visualize the global structures of the sprays and ignition process. The results showed that optically accessible engines provide very useful information for studying the diesel combustion conditions, which also provided a very critical test for diesel combustion models.
Technical Paper

A New Approach to Evaluate Instantaneous Friction and Its Components in Internal Combustion Engines

1984-02-01
840179
A new approach referred to as (P-ω) method, has been developed at Wayne State University to determine the instantaneous friction and its components in internal combustion engines. The method is based on the fact that the instantaneous cylinder gas forces and the instantaneous frictional, inertia and load forces cause the instantaneous variation in the flywheel angular velocity. The instantaneous total friction forces have been computed for a single diesel engine, under idling conditions. A breakdown of the friction into its components and a formulation for each component has been made. By applying linear regression, correlations between the individual components of the friction losses and the different parameters have been developed. The components are classified into two categories: piston assembly losses and crankcase assembly losses.
Technical Paper

Dynamic Parameters for Engine Diagnostics: Effect of Sampling

1993-09-01
932411
Several dynamic parameters for the diagnosis of reciprocating combustion engines are investigated. Emphasis is made on the effect of sampling. The dynamic parameters include the frequency analysis, autocorrelation function, the frequency analysis of the autocorrelation function, variation of the angular velocity peaks, variation of the angular velocity depressions, variation of the angular velocity from before to after top dead center, velocity index and acceleration index. Two sampling techniques are used to measure the instantaneous angular velocity of a six cylinder, four-stroke-cycle diesel engine, under healthy and faulty conditions. The most effective dynamic parameters for engine diagnostics are determined.
Technical Paper

A Diagnostic Technique for the identification of Misfiring Cylinder(s)

1987-02-01
870546
This paper introduces a diagnostic technique for the detection of misfiring cylinders in internal combustion engines. The technique requires the analysis of the instantaneous angular velocity of an engine flywheel. The results show that the mean cyclic acceleration, maximum variation in angular velocity, and the cyclic period of acceleration can be used as a measure for the mean net torque and the mean net expansion pressure torque produced by each cylinder. The proposed technique has proven to be effective in identifying a faulty cylinder using efficient and simple computations.
Technical Paper

Starting of Diesel Engines: Uncontrolled Fuel Injection Problems

1986-02-01
860253
Many problems can develop from the uncontrolled fuel injection during cranking and starting of diesel engines. Some of the problems are related to excessive wear as a result of the high peak pressures reached upon combustion after misfiring, the relatively low rotating speeds and the lack of formation of a lubricating oil film between the interacting surfaces. Another problem is the emission of high amounts of unburned hydrocarbons and white smoke. Experimental results are given for a single cylinder and a multicylinder diesel engine, for the instantaneous angular velocity and cylinder pressures from the starter-on point until the engine fires. The causes of misfiring during cranking are investigated. The role of the increased blow-by gases on the autoignition process at the low cranking speeds is analyzed both analytically and experimentally. The contribution of the instantaneous angular velocity at the time of injection, on the autoignition process is investigated.
Technical Paper

Transient Engine and Piston Friction During Starting

1992-10-01
922197
The instantaneous frictional torque (IFT) of the engine and the piston-ring assembly frictional force (PRAFF) were determined during cranking and starting of a direct injection single cylinder diesel engine. The measurements included the cylinder gas pressure, the instantaneous torque of the electric starter, the angular velocity of the crankshaft and the axial force on the connecting rod. The engine and piston friction were determined every crank angle degree for all the cycles from the time the starter was engaged to the time the engine reached the idling speed. The data was analyzed and a comparison was made between the friction in successive cycles.
Technical Paper

Diesel Starting: A Mathematical Model

1988-02-01
880426
A mathematical model Is developed to study the transient behavior of a four-stroke, single cylinder naturally-aspirated, DI diesel engine during cranking and starting. The model simulates the full thermodynamic cycle of the engine and includes detailed sub-models for the intake and exhaust gas flow processes, autoignition combustion, heat transfer, mechanical friction, blowby, and engine dynamics. The model considers the period of time from starter on until the engine reaches the idle speed. Experimental data and results obtained from the engine are used to calibrate and validate the model. A comparison of results from the model and the experiments generally show good agreement for the starting conditions investigated.
Technical Paper

Compression Ratio Optimization in a Direct-Injection Diesel Engine: A Mathematical Model

1988-02-01
880427
This paper describes the development and results of a mathematical model for a single cylinder, naturally-aspirated, direct-injection diesel engine, used to study the effect of compression ratio on the different performance parameters. The parameters investigated include; thermal and mechanical efficiency, ignition delay, mean effective pressure, maximum cylinder pressure, mechanical friction, and blowby. The model simulates a full thermodynamic cycle and considers the intake and exhaust processes, instantaneous heat transfer, instantaneous friction, and instantaneous blowby. Based on the model results, a prediction of an optimum CR for the engine is made.
Technical Paper

Cycle-To-Cycle Variation with Low Ignition Quality Fuels in a CFR Diesel Engine

1979-02-01
790924
Cycle-to-cycle cylinder pressure variation has been observed in a CFR prechamber diesel engine when low ignition quality (low cetane number) fuels are burned. A statistical analysis of this phenomenon for various fuels and blends with cetane numbers as low as zero has been made. Operating conditions used were those specified by the ASTM Cetane Method for rating diesel fuels, in which the inlet air temperature is 150°F. Additional analysis was made at increased inlet air temperatures of 250°F and 350°F. The cycle-to-cycle variation has been characterized by the variation in the ignition (or pressure rise) delay time. It has been found to increase sharply as fuel cetane number is decreased below 20. The variation in dynamic injection timing was also measured and correlated with that for ignition delay.
Technical Paper

Diesel Engine Cold Starting: Combustion Instability

1992-02-01
920005
Combustion instability is investigated during the cold starting of a single cylinder, direct injection, 4-stroke-cycle, air-cooled diesel engine. The experiments covered fuels of different properties at different ambient air temperatures and injection timings. The analysis showed that the pattern of misfiring (skipping) is not random but repeatable. The engine may skip once (8-stroke-cycle operation) or twice (12-stroke-cycle operation) or more times. The engine may shift from one mode of operation to another and finally run steadily on the 4-stroke cycle. All the fuels tested produced this type of operation at different degrees. The reasons for the combustion instability were analyzed and found to be related to speed, residual gas temperature and composition, accumulated fuel and ambient air temperature.
Technical Paper

Experimental Determination of the Instantaneous Frictional Torque in Multicylinder Engines

1996-10-01
962006
An experimental method for determining the Instantaneous Frictional Torque (IFT) using pressure transducers on every cylinder and speed measurements at both ends of the crankshaft is presented. The speed variation measured at one end of the crankshaft is distorted by torsional vibrations making it difficult to establish a simple and direct correlation between the acting torque and measured speed. Using a lumped mass model of the crankshaft and modal analysis techniques, the contributions of the different natural modes to the motion along the crankshaft axis are determined. Based on this model a method was devised to combine speed measurements made at both ends of the crankshaft in such a way as to eliminate the influence of torsional vibrations and obtain the equivalent rigid body motion of the crankshaft. This motion, the loading torque and the gas pressure torque are utilized to determine the IFT.
Technical Paper

In-Situ Phase-Shift Measurement of the Time-Resolved UBHC Emissions

1995-02-01
950161
The UBHC emissions during cold starting need to be controlled in order to meet the future stringent standards. This requires a better understanding of the characteristics of the time resolved UBHC signal measured by a high frequency FID and its phasing with respect to the valve events. The computer program supplied with the instrument and currently used to compute the phase shift has many uncertainties due to the unsteady nature of engine operation during starting. A new technique is developed to measure the in-situ phase shift of the UBHC signal under the transient thermodynamic and dynamic conditions of the engine. The UBHC concentration is measured at two locations in the exhaust manifold of one cylinder in a multicylinder port injected gasoline engine. The two locations are 77 mm apart. The downstream probe is positioned opposite to a solenoid-operated injector which delivers a gaseous jet of hydrocarbon-free nitrogen upon command.
X