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Technical Paper

Vehicle Mass Estimation from CAN Data and Drivetrain Torque Observer

2017-03-28
2017-01-1590
A method for estimating the vehicle mass in real time is presented. Traditional mass estimation methods suffer due a lack of knowledge of the vehicle parameters, the road surface conditions and most importantly the effect of the vehicle transmission. To resolve these issues, a method independent of a vehicle model is utilized in conjunction with a drivetrain output torque observer to obtain the estimate of the vehicle mass. Simulations and experimental track tests indicate that the method is able to accurately estimate the vehicle mass with a relatively fast rate of convergence compared to traditional methods.
Technical Paper

Online and Real-Time Condition Prediction for Transmissions based on CAN-Signals

2017-03-28
2017-01-1627
An online and real-time Condition Prediction system, so-called lifetime monitoring system, was developed at the Institute for Mechatronic Systems in Mechanical Engineering (IMS) of the TU Darmstadt, which is intended for implementation in standard control units of series production cars. Without additional hardware and only based on sensors and signals already available in a standard car, the lifetime monitoring system aims at recording the load/usage profiles of transmission components in aggregated form and at estimating continuously their remaining useful life. For this purpose, the dynamic transmission input and output torques are acquired realistically through sensor fusion. In a further step, the lifetime monitoring system is used as an input-module for the introduction of innovative procedures to more load appropriate dimensioning, cost-efficient lightweight design, failure-free operation and predictive maintenance of transmissions.
Technical Paper

Electric Power Train Configurations with Appropriate Transmission Systems

2011-04-12
2011-01-0942
Referring to the transmission development, three different classifications of the power train are useful. These are the conventional power train with combustion-engined drive of the wheels, the electric power train with electromotive drive of the wheels and the hybrid power train with both types of drive. Due to this division, the micro hybrid belongs to the conventional power train while the serial hybrid is classified with the electric power train. Subdivisions of the electric power train are the decentralized drives near the axle shafts or the wheel hub drive and the central drive with differential. The choice of the electric motor is dependent on different influences such as the package, the costs or the application area. Furthermore the execution of the transmission system does influence the electric motor. Wheel hub drives are usually executed on wheel speed level or with single ratio transmission.
Technical Paper

Developing a Compact Continuous-State Markov Chain for Terrain Road Profiles

2013-04-08
2013-01-0629
Accurate terrain models provide the chassis designer with a powerful tool to make informed design decisions early in the design process. It is beneficial to characterize the terrain as a stochastic process, allowing limitless amounts of synthetic terrain to be created from a small number of parameters. A continuous-state Markov chain is proposed as an alternative to the traditional discrete-state chain currently used in terrain modeling practice. For discrete-state chains, the profile transitions are quantized then characterized by a transition matrix (with many values). In contrast, the transition function of a continuous-state chain represents the probability density of transitioning between any two states in the continuum of terrain heights. The transition function developed in this work uses a location-scale distribution with polynomials modeling the parameters as functions of the current state.
Journal Article

Control Strategy for the Excitation of a Complete Vehicle Test Rig with Terrain Constraints

2013-04-08
2013-01-0671
A unique concept for a multi-body test rig enabling the simulation of longitudinal, steering and vertical dynamics was developed at the Institute for Mechatronic Systems (IMS) at TU Darmstadt. A prototype of this IMS test rig is currently being built. In conjunction with the IMS test rig, the Vehicle Terrain Performance Laboratory (VTPL) at Virginia Tech further developed a full car, seven degree of freedom (7 DOF) simulation model capable of accurately reproducing measured displacement, pitch, and roll of the vehicle body due to terrain excitation. The results of the 7 DOF car model were used as the reference input to the multi-body IMS test rig model. The goal of the IMS/VTPL joint effort was to determine whether or not a controller for the IMS test rig vertical actuator could accurately reproduce wheel displacements due to different measured terrain constraints.
Journal Article

Using Performance Margin and Dynamic Simulation for Location Aware Adaptation of Vehicle Dynamics

2013-04-08
2013-01-0703
One seminal question that faces a vehicle's driver (either human or computer) is predicting the capability of the vehicle as it encounters upcoming terrain. A Performance Margin (PM) is defined in this work as the ratio of the required tractive effort to the available tractive effort for the front and rear respectively. This simple definition stems from and incorporates many traditional handling metrics and is robust in its scope of applicability. The PM is implemented in an Intervention Strategy demonstrating its use to avoid situations in which the vehicle exceeds its handling capabilities. Results from a design case study are presented to show the potential efficacy of developing a PM-based control system.
Journal Article

Location-Aware Adaptive Vehicle Dynamics System: Brake Modulation

2014-04-01
2014-01-0079
A Location-Aware Adaptive Vehicle Dynamics System (LAAVDS) is developed to assist the driver in maintaining vehicle handling capabilities through various driving maneuvers. An integral part of this System is an Intervention Strategy that uses a novel measure of handling capability, the Performance Margin, to assess the need to intervene. Through this strategy, the driver's commands are modulated to affect desired changes to the Performance Margin in a manner that is minimally intrusive to the driver's control authority. Real-time implementation requires the development of computationally efficient predictive vehicle models. This work develops one means to alter the future vehicle states: modulating the driver's brake commands. This control strategy must be considered in relationship to changes in the throttle commands. Three key elements of this strategy are developed in this work.
Journal Article

Location-Aware Adaptive Vehicle Dynamics System: Concept Development

2014-04-01
2014-01-0121
One seminal question that faces a vehicle's driver (either human or computer) is predicting the capability of the vehicle as it encounters upcoming terrain. A Location-Aware Adaptive Vehicle Dynamics (LAAVD) System is developed to assist the driver in maintaining vehicle handling capabilities through various driving maneuvers. In contrast to current active safety systems, this system is predictive rather than reactive. This work provides the conceptual groundwork for the proposed system. The LAAVD System employs a predictor-corrector method in which the driver's input commands (throttle, brake, steering) and upcoming driving environment (terrain, traffic, weather) are predicted. An Intervention Strategy uses a novel measure of handling capability, the Performance Margin, to assess the need to intervene. The driver's throttle and brake control are modulated to affect desired changes to the Performance Margin in a manner that is minimally intrusive to the driver's control authority.
Journal Article

Location-Aware Adaptive Vehicle Dynamics System: Throttle Modulation

2014-04-01
2014-01-0105
A Location-Aware Adaptive Vehicle Dynamics System (LAAVDS) is developed to assist the driver in maintaining vehicle handling capabilities through various driving maneuvers. An Intervention Strategy uses a novel measure of handling capability, the Performance Margin, to assess the need to intervene. The driver's commands are modulated to affect desired changes to the Performance Margin in a manner that is minimally intrusive to the driver's control authority. Real-time implementation requires the development of computationally efficient predictive vehicle models which is the focus of this work. This work develops one means to alter the future vehicle states: modulating the driver's throttle commands. First, changes to the longitudinal force are translated to changes in engine torque based on the current operating state (torque and speed) of the engine.
Technical Paper

Control Strategy for the Longitudinal Degree of Freedom of a Complete Vehicle Test Rig

2012-04-16
2012-01-0232
The Institute for Mechatronic Systems in Mechanical Engineering (IMS) designed a concept for a test rig, which enables the simulation of longitudinal, steering and vertical dynamics for a complete vehicle under laboratory conditions. The main part of the test rig concept is a shaft, which contains three constant velocity joints and two ball-spline supported length compensations. It connects the wheel hub of the test car to an electric motor. In addition a linear actuator is mounted to the middle part of the shaft and a hydraulic actuator replaces the suspension strut. These actuators can load the longitudinal, steering and vertical degree of freedom of the test car according to simulated driving maneuvers. A prototype of this concept is being built at the IMS lab. Beginning with a precise explanation of the test rig concept this paper discusses the control strategy for the rotational speed of the wheel hub of the car mounted on the test rig based on a simulation.
Journal Article

Car-in-the-Loop Complete Vehicle Test Rig

2015-04-14
2015-01-0647
During the last years mechatronic systems developed into one of the biggest drivers of innovation in the automotive industry. The start of production of systems like dual clutch transmission, lane departure warning systems and active suspensions proves this statement. These systems have an influence on the longitudinal, steering and vertical dynamics of the vehicle. That is why the interaction on vehicle level is crucial for an optimal result in the fields of efficiency, comfort, safety and dynamics. To optimize the interaction of mechatronic systems, in this paper a new test rig concept for a complete vehicle is presented. The so-called Car-in-the-Loop-concept is capable of realistically reproducing the loads, which act on the powertrain, the steering and the suspension during a test drive.
Technical Paper

Terrain Roughness Standards for Mobility and Ultra-Reliability Prediction

2003-03-03
2003-01-0218
The U.S. Army uses the root mean squared of elevation, or the RMSE standard for characterizing road/off-road roughness descriptions. This standard has often appeared in contracts as a performance requirement for the vehicle system. One important application of the standard is describing the testing environment for the vehicle. A physical test, which uses the standard, is the 30,000 mile endurance test. More recently, another metric has been used, the power spectral density (PSD) of road roughness. The international standard for road roughness is known as the International Roughness Index (IRI), and all road construction projects in the U.S. are based on this, as well as Department of Transportation analyses. This paper will analyze the different standards by comparing and contrasting the various aspects of each. Depending on the standard and metrics chosen, the simulation results will have different correlations with actual test.
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