Refine Your Search

Search Results

Viewing 1 to 5 of 5
Technical Paper

Status of the Regenerative ECLSS Water Recovery System

2008-06-29
2008-01-2133
NASA is completing the development of a regenerative water recovery system (WRS) for the International Space Station (ISS). The major assemblies included in this system are the Water Processor Assembly (WPA) and Urine Processor Assembly (UPA). Test activities have been completed for the system and planning for launch and on-orbit activation is underway. This paper summarizes the status as of April 2008 and describes some of the technical challenges encountered and lessons learned over the past year.
Technical Paper

Status of the Regenerative ECLSS Water Recovery System

2007-07-09
2007-01-3100
NASA is developing a regenerative water recovery system (WRS) for deployment on the International Space Station (ISS). The major assemblies included in this system are the Water Processor Assembly (WPA) and Urine Processor Assembly (UPA). The WPA has been developed by Hamilton Sundstrand Space Systems International (HSSSI), Inc., while the UPA has been developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Test and verification activities have been completed for the system and planning for launch and on-orbit activation is underway. This paper summarizes the status as of April 2007 and describes some of the technical challenges encountered and lessons learned over the past year.
Technical Paper

Status of the Regenerative ECLSS Water Recovery and Oxygen Generation Systems

2006-07-17
2006-01-2057
NASA is developing three racks containing regenerative water recovery and oxygen generation systems (WRS and OGS) for deployment on the International Space Station (ISS). The major assemblies included in these racks are the Water Processor Assembly (WPA), Urine Processor Assembly (UPA), Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA), and the Power Supply Module (PSM) supporting the OGA. The WPA and OGA were developed by Hamilton Sundstrand Space Systems International (HSSSI), Inc. while the UPA and PSM were developed by the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Test and verification activities have been completed for the WRS and OGS systems and planning for launch and on-orbit activation is underway. This paper summarizes the status as of April 2006 and describes some of the technical challenges encountered and lessons learned over the past year.
Technical Paper

Evolution of the Baseline ISS ECLSS Technologies-The Next Logical Steps

2004-07-19
2004-01-2385
The baseline environmental control and life support (ECLS) systems currently deployed on board the International Space Station (ISS) and that planned to be launched in Node 3 are based upon technologies selected in the early 1990's. While they are generally meeting or exceeding requirements for supporting the ISS crew, lessons learned from years of on orbit and ground testing, together with new advances in technology state of the art, and the unique requirements for future manned missions prompt consideration of the next logical step to enhance these systems to increase performance, robustness, and reliability, and reduce on-orbit and logistical resource requirements. This paper discusses the current state of the art in ISS ECLS system technologies, and identifies possible areas for enhancement and improvement.
Technical Paper

Status of the International Space Station Regenerative ECLSS Water Recovery and Oxygen Generation Systems

2005-07-11
2005-01-2779
NASA is developing three racks containing regenerative water recovery and oxygen generation systems (WRS and OGS) for deployment on the International Space Station (ISS). The major assemblies included in these racks are the Water Processor Assembly (WPA), Urine Processor Assembly (UPA), Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA), and the Power Supply Module (PSM) supporting the OGA. The WPA and OGA are provided by Hamilton Sundstrand Space Systems International (HSSSI), Inc., while the UPA and PSM are developed in-house by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The assemblies have completed the manufacturing phase and are in various stages of testing and integration into the flight racks. This paper summarizes the status as of April 2005 and describes some of the technical challenges encountered and lessons learned over the past year.
X