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Technical Paper

Intake and ECM Submodel Improvements for Dynamic SI Engine Models: Examination of Tip-In/Tip-Out

1991-02-01
910074
Improved submodels for use in a dynamic engine/vehicle model have been developed and the resulting code has been used to analyze the tip-in, tip-out behavior of a computer-controlled port fuel injected SI engine. This code consists of four submodels. The intake simulation submodel is similar to prior intake models, but some refinements have been made to the fuel flow model to more properly simulate a timed port injection system, and it is believed that these refinements may be of general interest. A general purpose engine simulation code has been used as a subroutine for the cycle simulation submodel. A conventional vehicle simulation submodel is also included in the model formulation. Perhaps most importantly, a submodel has been developed that explicitly simulates the response of the on-board computer (ECM) control system.
Technical Paper

The 1983 Formula SAE Championship Competition

1983-09-12
831390
This paper discusses the Formula SAE Student Engineering Design Competition that was held May 26-28, 1983. As was the case of previous student engineering design competitions, the purpose of the Formula SAE Competition is to enhance engineering education by requiring students to apply the technical knowledge gained in their coursework to a practical engineering design problem including choice of appropriate design criteria, design, fabrication, testing, and evaluation. For the Formula SAE Competition, the design problem chosen is to design, construct, and compete a low powered Formula type race car. The purpose of this paper is to describe the 1983 Formula SAE Competition and to present the results of this event. It is expected that this paper will serve as a guide to hosts of similar competitions and will aid future Formula SAE competitors.
Technical Paper

The 1982 National Intercollegiate Formula SAE Competition

1982-02-01
821093
This paper discusses the Formula SAE Student Engineering Design Competition that was held May 27–29, 1982. As was the case of previous student engineering design competitions, the purpose of the Formula SAE Competition is to enhance engineering education by requiring students to apply the technical knowledge gained in their coursework to a practical engineering design problem including choice of appropriate design criteria, design, fabrication, testing, and evaluation. For the Formula SAE Competition, the design problem chosen is to design, construct, and compete a low powered Indianapolis-type race car. The purpose of this paper is to describe the 1982 Formula SAE Competition and to present the results of this event. It is expected that this paper will serve as a guide to hosts of similar competitions and will aid future Formula SAE competitors.
Technical Paper

The 1984 Formula SAE Intercollegiate Competition

1984-09-01
841163
This paper discusses the Formula SAE Student Engineering Design Competition that was held May 24-26, 1984. As was the case of previous student engineering design competitions, the purpose of the Formula SAE Competition is to enhance engineering education by requiring students to apply the technical knowledge gained in their coursework to a practical engineering design problem including choice of appropriate design criteria, design, fabrication, testing, and evaluation. For the Formula SAE Competition, the design problem chosen is to design, construct, and compete a low powered Formula type race car. The purpose of this paper is to describe the 1984 Formula SAE Competition and to present the results of this event. It is expected that this paper will serve as a guide to hosts of similar competitions and will aid future Formula SAE competitors.
Technical Paper

Coastdown Coefficient Analysis of Heavy-Duty Vehicles and Application to the Examination of the Effects of Grade and Other Parameters on Fuel Consumption

2012-09-24
2012-01-2051
To perform coastdown tests on heavy-duty trucks, both long acceleration and coasting distances are required. It is very difficult to find long flat stretches of road to conduct these tests; for a Class 8 truck loaded to 80,000 lb, about 7 miles of road is needed to complete the coastdown tests. In the present study, a method for obtaining coastdown coefficients from data taken on a road of variable grade is presented. To this end, a computer code was written to provide a fast solution for the coastdown coefficients. Class 7 and Class 8 trucks were tested with three different weight configurations: empty, “cubed-out” (fully loaded but with a payload of moderate density), and “weighed-out” (loaded to the maximum permissible weight).
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