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Standard

Passenger Car and Light Truck Axles

2011-09-06
CURRENT
J2200_201109
This SAE Recommended Practice is intended to outline basic nomenclature for axle designs in common use for automotive drives. Over a period of years, there have been many different designs; however, for the purpose of this report, only the most common designs have been selected and only their general construction is illustrated to show the nomenclature of the various parts.
Standard

Passenger Car and Light Truck Axles

1991-01-09
HISTORICAL
J2200_199101
This SAE Recommended Practice is intended to outline basic nomenclature for axle designs in common use for automotive drives. Over a period of years, there have been many different designs; however, for the purpose of this report, only the most common designs have been selected and only their general construction is illustrated to show the nomenclature of the various parts.
Standard

Passenger Car and Light Truck Axles

2001-11-01
HISTORICAL
J2200_200111
This SAE Recommended Practice is intended to outline basic nomenclature for axle designs in common use for automotive drives. Over a period of years, there have been many different designs; however, for the purpose of this report, only the most common designs have been selected and only their general construction is illustrated to show the nomenclature of the various parts.
Standard

Manual Transmission and Transaxle Efficiency and Parasitic Loss Measurement

2011-09-02
CURRENT
J2453_201109
Because of the intense focus on CAFE and fuel emission standards, optimization of the automobile drivetrain is imperative. In light of this, component efficiencies have become an important factor in the drivetrain decision-making process. It has therefore become necessary to develop a universal standard to judge transmission efficiency. This SAE Recommended Practice specifies the dynamometer test procedure which maps a manual transmission’s efficiency. The document is separated into two parts. The first compares input and output torque throughout a specified input speed range in order to determine “in-gear” transmission efficiency. The second procedure measures parasitic losses experienced while in neutral at nominal idling speeds and also churning losses while in gear. The application of this document is intended for passenger car and light truck. All references to transmissions throughout this document include transaxles.
Standard

Measurement of Fuel Evaporative Emissions From Gasoline Powered Passenger Cars and Light Trucks Using the Enclosure Technique

1991-04-01
HISTORICAL
J171_199104
This SAE Recommended Practice describes a procedure for measuring evaporative emissions from fuel systems of passenger cars and light trucks. Emissions are measured during a sequence of laboratory tests that simulate typical vehicle usage in a metropolitan area during summer months: 1.) A 1 h soak representing one diurnal cycle in which temperature of fuel in the vehicle's tank is raised from 15.6 to 28.9 degrees C (60 to 84 degrees F). 2.) A 17.9 km (11.1 mile) run on a chassis dynamometer. 3.) A 1 h hot soak immediately following the 17.9 km (11.1 mile) drive. The method described in this document, commonly known as the SHED (Sealed Housing for Evaporative Determination) technique, employs an enclosure in which the vehicle is placed during the diurnal and hot soak phases of the test.
Standard

Measurement of Fuel Evaporative Emissions from Gasoline Powered Passenger Carsand Light Trucks Using the Enclosure Technique

2000-12-07
CURRENT
J171_200012
This SAE Recommended Practice describes a procedure for measuring evaporative emissions from fuel systems of passenger cars and light trucks. Emissions are measured during a sequence of laboratory tests that simulate typical vehicle usage in a metropolitan area during summer months: a. A 1 h soak representing one diurnal cycle in which temperature of fuel in the vehicle's tank is raised from 15.6 to 28.9 °C (60 to 84 °F) b. A 17.9 km (11.1 mile) drive on a chassis dynamometer c. A 1 h hot soak immediately following the 17.9 km (11.1 mile) drive The method described in this document, commonly known as the SHED (Sealed Housing for Evaporative Determination) technique, employs an enclosure in which the vehicle is placed during the diurnal and hot soak phases of the test.
Standard

Measurement of Fuel Evaporative Emissions from Gasoline Powered Passenger Carsand Light Trucks Using the Enclosure Technique

1982-06-01
HISTORICAL
J171_198206
This SAE Recommended Practice describes a procedure for measuring evaporative emissions from fuel systems of passenger cars and light trucks. Emissions are measured during a sequence of laboratory tests that simulate typical vehicle usage in a metropolitan area during summer months: a. A 1 h soak representing one diurnal cycle in which temperature of fuel in the vehicle's tank is raised from 15.6 to 28.9 °C (60 to 84 °F) b. A 17.9 km (11.1 mile) drive on a chassis dynamometer c. A 1 h hot soak immediately following the 17.9 km (11.1 mile) drive The method described in this document, commonly known as the SHED (Sealed Housing for Evaporative Determination) technique, employs an enclosure in which the vehicle is placed during the diurnal and hot soak phases of the test.
Standard

Measurement of Fuel Evaporative Emissions from Gasoline Powered Passenger Carsand Light Trucks Using the Enclosure Technique

1970-09-01
HISTORICAL
J171_197009
This SAE Recommended Practice describes a procedure for measuring evaporative emissions from fuel systems of passenger cars and light trucks. Emissions are measured during a sequence of laboratory tests that simulate typical vehicle usage in a metropolitan area during summer months: a. A 1 h soak representing one diurnal cycle in which temperature of fuel in the vehicle's tank is raised from 15.6 to 28.9 °C (60 to 84 °F) b. A 17.9 km (11.1 mile) drive on a chassis dynamometer c. A 1 h hot soak immediately following the 17.9 km (11.1 mile) drive The method described in this document, commonly known as the SHED (Sealed Housing for Evaporative Determination) technique, employs an enclosure in which the vehicle is placed during the diurnal and hot soak phases of the test.
Standard

Medium- and Heavy-Duty Truck Converter/Muffler Configuration

1993-02-19
HISTORICAL
J1642_199302
This SAE Draft Technical Report is intended to document the technical consensus of the current design state of converter/mufflers for heavy-duty emission classification diesel vehicle applications. This will maximize standardization and promote interchangeability of parts from different manufacturers. The purpose of this SAE Draft Technical Report is to give the technical community the opportunity to review, comment on, and use the Draft Technical Report prior to its final approval by SAE.
Standard

Medium- and Heavy-Duty Truck Converter/Muffler Configuration

2001-11-15
CURRENT
J1642_200111
This SAE Draft Technical Report is intended to document the technical consensus of the current design state of converter/mufflers for heavy-duty emission classification diesel vehicle applications. This will maximize standardization and promote interchangeability of parts from different manufacturers. The purpose of this SAE Draft Technical Report is to give the technical community the opportunity to review, comment on, and use the Draft Technical Report prior to its final approval by SAE.
Standard

Measurement of Fuel Evaporative Emissions from Gasoline Powered Passenger Carsand Light Trucks Using the Enclosure Technique

1977-09-01
HISTORICAL
J171A_197709
This SAE Recommended Practice describes a procedure for measuring evaporative emissions from fuel systems of passenger cars and light trucks. Emissions are measured during a sequence of laboratory tests that simulate typical vehicle usage in a metropolitan area during summer months: a. A 1 h soak representing one diurnal cycle in which temperature of fuel in the vehicle's tank is raised from 15.6 to 28.9 °C (60 to 84 °F) b. A 17.9 km (11.1 mile) drive on a chassis dynamometer c. A 1 h hot soak immediately following the 17.9 km (11.1 mile) drive The method described in this document, commonly known as the SHED (Sealed Housing for Evaporative Determination) technique, employs an enclosure in which the vehicle is placed during the diurnal and hot soak phases of the test.
Standard

Measurement of Fuel Evaporative Emissions from Gasoline Powered Passenger Carsand Light Trucks Using the Enclosure Technique

1972-07-01
HISTORICAL
J171A_197207
This SAE Recommended Practice describes a procedure for measuring evaporative emissions from fuel systems of passenger cars and light trucks. Emissions are measured during a sequence of laboratory tests that simulate typical vehicle usage in a metropolitan area during summer months: a. A 1 h soak representing one diurnal cycle in which temperature of fuel in the vehicle's tank is raised from 15.6 to 28.9 °C (60 to 84 °F) b. A 17.9 km (11.1 mile) drive on a chassis dynamometer c. A 1 h hot soak immediately following the 17.9 km (11.1 mile) drive The method described in this document, commonly known as the SHED (Sealed Housing for Evaporative Determination) technique, employs an enclosure in which the vehicle is placed during the diurnal and hot soak phases of the test.
Standard

Reporting on Emission Testing for In-Use Light-Duty Trucks and Passenger Vehicles

2001-06-27
CURRENT
J1712_200106
This SAE Recommended Practice applies to the reporting of laboratory and test site data from the gaseous and evaporative emission tests of in-use light duty trucks and passenger vehicles. This document describes the reporting of procedures, fuel specifications, and vehicle information necessary to compare the results of in-use tests. Any variations in vehicles, instrumentation, test equipment, or test program purpose should be adequately described.
Standard

Reporting on Emission Testing for In-Use Light-Duty Trucks and Passenger Vehicles

2000-10-01
HISTORICAL
J1712_200010
This SAE Recommended Practice applies to the reporting of laboratory and test site data from the gaseous and evaporative emission tests of in-use light duty trucks and passenger vehicles. This document describes the reporting of procedures, fuel specifications, and vehicle information necessary to compare the results of in-use tests. Any variations in vehicles, instrumentation, test equipment, or test program purpose should be adequately described.
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