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Technical Paper

Application of Sleeper Cab Thermal Management Technologies to Reduce Idle Climate Control Loads in Long-Haul Trucks

2012-09-24
2012-01-2052
In the United States, an intercity long-haul truck averages approximately 1,800 hrs per year for idling, primarily for sleeper cab hotel loads, consuming 838 million gallons of diesel fuel across the entire long-haul fleet [1]. Including workday idling, over 2 billion gallons of fuel are used annually for truck idling [2]. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is working on solutions to reduce idling fuel use through the CoolCab project. The objective of the CoolCab project is to work closely with industry to design efficient thermal management systems for long-haul trucks that minimize engine idling and fuel use while maintaining the cab occupant comfort. NREL conducted an experimental test program at their Vehicle Testing and Integration Facility in collaboration with Volvo Trucks, Aearo Technologies LLC / E-A-R Thermal Acoustic Systems - a 3M company, 3M Corporation, and Dometic Environmental Corporation.
Technical Paper

Sleeper Cab Climate Control Load Reduction for Long-Haul Truck Rest Period Idling

2015-04-14
2015-01-0351
Annual fuel use for long-haul truck rest period idling is estimated at 667 million gallons in the United States. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory's CoolCab project aims to reduce heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) loads and resulting fuel use from rest period idling by working closely with industry to design efficient long-haul truck climate control systems while maintaining occupant comfort. Enhancing the thermal performance of cab/sleepers will enable smaller, lighter, and more cost-effective idle reduction solutions. In order for candidate idle reduction technologies to be implemented at the original equipment manufacturer and fleet level, their effectiveness must be quantified. To address this need, a number of promising candidate technologies were evaluated through experimentation and modeling to determine their effectiveness in reducing rest period HVAC loads.
Technical Paper

Impact of Paint Color on Rest Period Climate Control Loads in Long-Haul Trucks

2014-04-01
2014-01-0680
Cab climate conditioning is one of the primary reasons for operating the main engine in a long-haul truck during driver rest periods. In the United States, sleeper cab trucks use approximately 667 million gallons of fuel annually for rest period idling. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) CoolCab Project works closely with industry to design efficient thermal management systems for long-haul trucks that minimize engine idling and fuel use while maintaining occupant comfort. Heat transfer to the vehicle interior from opaque exterior surfaces is one of the major heat pathways that contribute to air conditioning loads during long-haul truck daytime rest period idling. To quantify the impact of paint color and the opportunity for advanced paints, NREL collaborated with Volvo Group North America, PPG Industries, and Dometic Environmental Corporation.
Journal Article

Long-Haul Truck Sleeper Heating Load Reduction Package for Rest Period Idling

2016-04-05
2016-01-0258
Annual fuel use for sleeper cab truck rest period idling is estimated at 667 million gallons in the United States, or 6.8% of long-haul truck fuel use. Truck idling during a rest period represents zero freight efficiency and is largely done to supply accessory power for climate conditioning of the cab. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory’s CoolCab project aims to reduce heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) loads and resulting fuel use from rest period idling by working closely with industry to design efficient long-haul truck thermal management systems while maintaining occupant comfort. Enhancing the thermal performance of cab/sleepers will enable smaller, lighter, and more cost-effective idle reduction solutions. In addition, if the fuel savings provide a one- to three-year payback period, fleet owners will be economically motivated to incorporate them.
Technical Paper

Evaluating a Heavy-Duty Truck Climate Control System Using Thermal Comfort-Focused Testing and Simulation Techniques

2019-04-02
2019-01-0696
A test protocol previously developed for automotive applications was adapted to evaluate the performance of a climate control system for a heavy-duty truck. Human subjects, as well as a test system composed of a high-resolution passive sensor manikin and a human thermal model, were employed to evaluate thermal comfort perception. Testing was performed in a climate-controlled wind tunnel equipped with a dynamometer. The truck’s HVAC system performance was evaluated in a −10 °C environment. Additionally, the test protocol was designed to explore a large range of thermal sensation and comfort states. Subjective responses, including thermal sensation and comfort, as well as thermo-physiological state information, quantified by skin temperatures measured across the body, were obtained from the human test participants and compared to that which was indicated by the test system.
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