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Technical Paper

Designing Driver Interface for the UM-D's Low Mass Vehicle for China, India and the United States

2005-04-11
2005-01-0437
This paper presents a process and its results used to define and design interior items such as controls, displays, handles, etc. for a low mass vehicle (LMV) being developed at the University of Michigan-Dearborn. The exterior and interior design of the vehicle was done by students at the College of Creative Studies, Detroit. The size of the low mass vehicle is comparable to the current C-class production vehicles (such as Ford Focus), but it will weigh about 30% less than the Toyota Echo. The vehicle is targeted as a low cost, entry level, small car for markets in China, India and the United States. To assure that the feature content would be suitable for the three potential markets, students from China, India and the United States available on the UM-Dearborn campus were interviewed. The results from the survey were used to refine the exterior and interior features and content of the vehicle.
Technical Paper

Development of Specifications for the UM-D's Low Mass Vehicle for China, India and the United States

2005-04-11
2005-01-1027
This paper presents results of a research project conducted to develop a methodology and to refine the specifications of a small, low mass, low cost vehicle being developed at the University of Michigan-Dearborn. The challenge was to assure that the design would meet the needs and expectations of customers in three different countries, namely, China, India and the United States. U.S, Chinese and Indian students studying on the university campus represented customers from their respective countries for our surveys and provided us with the necessary data on: 1) Importance of various vehicle level attributes to the entry level small car customer, 2) Preferences to various features, and 3) Direction magnitude estimation on parameters to size the vehicle for each of the three markets.
Technical Paper

A Comprehensive HMI Evaluation Process for Automotive Cockpit Design

2003-03-03
2003-01-0126
This paper present a unique and comprehensive design process that has been pilot tested to assure that future automotive cockpit systems are well integrated, cost effective and they achieve superior ergonomics performance. With ever increasing possibilities of new technological feature content and tremendous cost pressures, the auto manufacturers have a challenging task to provide the customers with the latest features at affordable costs in shorter design cycles. The Automotive Cockpit Enablers (ACE) team consisting of seven automotive suppliers and two universities has created a unique process to approach the problem. The process consists of a series of steps and inter-workings of three cross-functional teams.
Technical Paper

ACE Driving Simulator and Its Applications to Evaluate Driver Interfaces

2003-03-03
2003-01-0124
A fixed base driving simulator called the VVDS (Virtual Vehicle Driving Simulator), its operating procedure and software system have been developed by a team of automotive suppliers (called ACE -- Advanced Cockpit Enabler) for quick evaluations of early working prototypes of driver interfaces. The system is designed to provide quick feedback to the product designers in early concept generation and validation phases of new automotive HMI architecture strategies and interfaces of various in-vehicle devices. The simulator consists of a reconfigurable cab with quick-change attachments to mount various controls and displays in package positions. A number of drivers are asked to drive the simulator and perform a number of tasks when prompted by pre-recorded voice commands. The entire data collection and data analysis procedure is developed such that new experiments can be configured, implemented and analyzed quickly and with the least amount of a human analyst’s involvement.
Technical Paper

Driver Steering Performance Using Joystick vs. Steering Wheel Controls

2003-03-03
2003-01-0118
A fixed-base driving simulator with a 14-degree of freedom vehicle dynamics model was used to compare the lane tracking performance of test subjects using a joystick steering controller to that using a conventional steering wheel. Three driving situations were studied: a) straight-line highway driving, b) winding road driving (country road), and c) evasive maneuvering - a double lane change event. In addition, three different joystick force-feedback settings were evaluated: i) linear force feedback, ii) non-linear, speed sensitive force feedback and iii) no force feedback. A conventional steering wheel with typical passenger car force feedback tuning was used for all of the driving events for comparison.
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