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Technical Paper

Advancement of GDCI Engine Technology for US 2025 CAFE and Tier 3 Emissions

2018-04-03
2018-01-0901
The automotive industry is facing tremendous challenges to improve fuel economy and emissions of the internal combustion engine. In the US, 2025 standards for fuel economy and CO2 emissions are extremely stringent. Simultaneously, vehicles must comply with new US Tier 3 emissions standards. In all market segments, there is a need for very clean and efficient engines operating on gasoline fuels. Gasoline Direct Injection Compression Ignition (GDCI) has been under development for several years and significant progress has been realized. As part of two US DOE programs, Delphi has developed a third generation GDCI engine that utilizes partially premixed compression ignition. The engine features an innovative “wetless”, low-temperature, combustion system with the latest high-pressure GDi injection system. The system was developed using extensive simulation and engine testing.
Technical Paper

Interactions of Multi-hole DI Sprays with Charge Motion and their Implications to Flexible Valve-trained Engine Performance

2011-08-30
2011-01-1883
Advanced valvetrain coupled with Direct Injection (DI) provides an opportunity to simultaneous reduction of fuel consumption and emissions. Because of their robustness and cost performance, multi-hole injectors are being adopted as gasoline DI fuel injectors. Ethanol and ethanol-gasoline blends synergistically improve the performance of a turbo-charged DI gasoline engine, especially in down-sized, down-sped and variable-valvetrain engine architecture. This paper presents Mie-scattering spray imaging results taken with an Optical Accessible Engine (OAE). OAE offers dynamic and realistic in-cylinder charge motion with direct imaging capability, and the interaction with the ethanol spray with the intake air is studied. Two types of cams which are designed for Early Intake Valve Close (EIVC) and Later Intake Valve Close (LIVC) are tested, and the effect of variable valve profile and deactivation of one of the intake valves are discussed.
Technical Paper

Charge Motion Benefits of Valve Deactivation to Reduce Fuel Consumption and Emissions in a GDi, VVA Engine

2011-04-12
2011-01-1221
Requirements for reduced fuel consumption with simultaneous reductions in regulated emissions require more efficient operation of Spark Ignited (SI) engines. An advanced valvetrain coupled with Gasoline Direct injection (GDi) provide an opportunity to simultaneously reduce fuel consumption and emissions. Work on a flex fuel GDi engine has identified significant potential to reduce throttling by using Early Intake Valve Closing (EIVC) and Late Intake Valve Closing (LIVC) strategies to control knock and load. High loads were problematic when operating on gasoline for particulate emissions, and low loads were not able to fully minimize throttling due to poor charge motion for the EIVC strategy. The use of valve deactivation was successful at reducing high load particulate emissions without a significant airflow penalty below 3000 RPM. Valve deactivation did increase the knocking tendency for knock limited fuels, due to increased heat transfer that increased charge temperature.
Technical Paper

Characterization of Multi-hole Spray and Mixing of Ethanol and Gasoline Fuels under DI Engine Conditions

2010-10-25
2010-01-2151
Because of their robustness and cost performance, multi-hole gasoline injectors are being adopted as the direct injection (DI) fuel injector of choice as vehicle manufacturers look for ways to reduce fuel consumption without sacrificing power and emission performance. To realize the full benefits of direct injection, the resulting spray needs to be well targeted, atomized, and appropriately mixed with charge air for the desirable fuel vapor concentration distributions in the combustion chamber. Ethanol and ethanol-gasoline blends synergistically improve the turbo-charged DI gasoline performance, especially in down-sized, down-sped and variable-valve-train engine architecture. This paper presents the spray imaging results from two multi-hole DI gasoline injectors with different design, fueled with pure ethanol (E100) or gasoline (E0), under homogeneous and stratified-charge conditions that represent typical engine operating points.
Technical Paper

Development of Long Haul Heavy Duty Vehicle Real World Fuel Economy Measurement Technique

2013-04-08
2013-01-0330
For many years, governments have driven the improvement of fuel economy in transportation through tightening legislation. This effort has focused on passenger cars, but is increasingly concerned with heavy-duty vehicles (HDV). The combination of this regulatory focus with the ever present desire for low cost of ownership in commercial vehicles is giving increased pressure to deliver more fuel efficiency from the lubricants. In order to deliver improved fuel efficiency, suitable test methodology is needed to give repeatable discriminatory results that not only help in the advance of technology, but can also highlight the magnitude of the benefit expected in real-world applications. Typical on-road driving has significant variation in fuel consumption due to driver inconsistency, changes in rolling resistance and changeable ambient conditions.
Technical Paper

Engine Efficiency Improvements Enabled by Ethanol Fuel Blends in a GDi VVA Flex Fuel Engine

2011-04-12
2011-01-0900
Advances in engine technology including Gasoline Direct injection (GDi), Dual Independent Cam Phasing (DICP), advanced valvetrain and boosting have allowed the simultaneous reductions of fuel consumption and emissions with increased engine power density. The utilization of fuels containing ethanol provides additional improvements in power density and potential for lower emissions due to the high octane rating and evaporative cooling of ethanol in the fuel. In this paper results are presented from a flexible fuel engine capable of operating with blends from E0-E85. The increased geometric compression ratio, (from 9.2 to 11.85) can be reduced to a lower effective compression ratio using advanced valvetrain operating on an Early Intake Valve Closing (EIVC) or Late Intake Valve Closing (LIVC) strategy. DICP with a high authority intake phaser is used to enable compression ratio management.
Technical Paper

Development of Heavy Duty Diesel Real World Drive Cycles for Fuel Economy Measurements

2013-10-14
2013-01-2568
Over several years, a fuel economy test measurement technique has been developed to highlight the magnitude of benefits expected in real world applications of different heavy-duty vehicle (HDV) engine oils in an operating vehicle. This method provides discriminatory results using an alternative to the widely used gravimetric fuel measurement methodology of Brake Specific Fuel Consumption (BSFC), in order to measure gains of <2% in a more repeatable manner. For the results to prove meaningful to the wider commercial audience, such as vehicle operators, original equipment manufacturers and oil providers, the systemic test vehicle operating conditions need to closely represent on-road conditions experienced on a daily basis by long haul, heavy duty diesel vehicles. This paper describes the parameters, necessary measures and methodologies required to record real world data and create representative proving ground test cycles.
Journal Article

Second Generation GDCI Multi-Cylinder Engine for High Fuel Efficiency and US Tier 3 Emissions

2016-04-05
2016-01-0760
The second generation 1.8L Gasoline Direct Injection Compression Ignition (GDCI) engine was built and tested using RON91 gasoline. The engine is intended to meet stringent US Tier 3 emissions standards with diesel-like fuel efficiency. The engine utilizes a fulltime, partially premixed combustion process without combustion mode switching. The second generation engine features a pentroof combustion chamber, 400 bar central-mounted injector, 15:1 compression ratio, and low swirl and squish. Improvements were made to all engine subsystems including fuel injection, valve train, thermal management, piston and ring pack, lubrication, EGR, boost, and aftertreatment. Low firing friction was a major engine design objective. Preliminary test results indicated good improvement in brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) over the first generation GDCI engines, while meeting targets for engine out emissions, combustion noise and stability.
Journal Article

GDCI Multi-Cylinder Engine for High Fuel Efficiency and Low Emissions

2015-04-14
2015-01-0834
A 1.8L Gasoline Direct Injection Compression Ignition (GDCI) engine was tested over a wide range of engine speeds and loads using RON91 gasoline. The engine was operated with a new partially premixed combustion process without combustion mode switching. Injection parameters were used to control mixture stratification and combustion phasing using a multiple-late injection strategy with GDi-like injection pressures. At idle and low loads, rebreathing of hot exhaust gases provided stable compression ignition with very low engine-out NOx and PM emissions. Rebreathing enabled reduced boost pressure, while increasing exhaust temperatures greatly. Hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide emissions after the oxidation catalyst were very low. Brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) of 267 g/kWh was measured at the 2000 rpm-2bar BMEP global test point.
Technical Paper

Pathway to 50% Brake Thermal Efficiency using Gasoline Direct-Injection Compression-Ignition (GDCI)

2019-04-02
2019-01-1154
Continued improvement in the combustion process of internal combustion engines is necessary to reduce fuel consumption, CO2 emissions, and criteria emissions for automotive transportation around the world. One consequence of increased engine efficiency is lower exhaust temperatures. This presents challenges for both turbocharging and aftertreatment. In this paper, test results for the third generation Gasoline Direct Injection Compression Ignition (GDCI) engine are presented. The engine is a 2.2L, four-cylinder, double-overhead-cam engine with compression ratio ~16:1. A 2.5kW electric air heater positioned upstream of the intake valves is used for cold starts; no spark plugs are used. The engine features a wetless combustion system with a high-pressure GDi fuel system. At low load, exhaust rebreathing was used to promote autoignition and elevate exhaust temperatures to maintain high catalyst conversion efficiency.
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