Refine Your Search

Search Results

Viewing 1 to 9 of 9
Technical Paper

Direct Heat Loss to Combustion Chamber Walls in a D.I. Diesel Engine-Development of Measurement Technique and Evaluation of Direct Heat Loss to Cylinder Liner Wall

2007-09-16
2007-24-0006
The purpose of this study is to clarify the state of heat loss to the cylinder liner of the tested engine of which piston and cylinder head were previously measured. The authors' group developed an original measurement technique of instantaneous surface temperature at the cylinder liner wall using thin-film thermocouples. The temperature was measured at 36 points in total. The instantaneous heat flux was calculated by heat transfer analysis using measurement results of the temperature at the wall. As a result, the heat loss ratio to all combustion chamber walls is evaluated except the intake and exhaust valves.
Technical Paper

Buffer Tube of Silicone Rubber Film for Damping the Pulsating Flow in Exhaust or Induction Systems of Reciprocating Engines

2003-05-19
2003-01-2016
Regarding measurement of the flow rate of exhaust gas or intake air of engines with several instruments, the pulsating flow in systems causes the error in indicated flow values. Usually a buffer tank is employed for decreasing the pulse. However the tank is rather inconvenient. The authors have developed the named “Surge Tube”, which is composed of a thin silicone rubber film tube having a considerable thermal and mechanical durability. In the conditions near atmospheric pressure, the effective volume as a buffer tank is over 100 times the free real tube volume, without any change in dead volume. The static relations between the inner volume change and the pressure are the most important characteristics, depending on the diameter, thickness, volume, and hardness of the silicone rubber film. The dynamic characteristics of the Surge Tubes are shown as the static pressure configurations at the inlet and outlet of the Surge Tube.
Technical Paper

The Effect of Knock on Heat Loss in Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Engines

2002-03-04
2002-01-0108
One of the problems in HCCI combustion is a knocking in higher load conditions. It governs the high load limit, and it is suggested that the knock increases heat loss[1], because it breaks the thermal boundary layer. But it is not clear how much knock affects on heat loss in the HCCI combustion in various conditions, such as ignition timing and load. The motivation of this study is to clarify the ratio of heat loss caused by knock in HCCI engines. The heat loss from zero-dimensional calculations with modified heat transfer coefficient, which is considering the effect of knock by adding a term of cylinder pressure rising rate dp/dt, agreed well with the results from the thermodynamic analysis in various conditions. And the results show that it is possible to avoid heat loss by knock by controlling the ignition timing at appropriate timing after T.D.C. and it will be possible to expand the load range if knock can be avoided.
Technical Paper

Measurement of Instantaneous Heat Flux Flowing Into Metallic and Ceramic Combustion Chamber Walls

2000-06-19
2000-01-1815
Accurate measurements of combustion gas temperature and the coefficient of heat transfer between the gas and the combustion chamber wall of internal combustion engine in cyclic operations are difficult at present. Hence the only method available for determination of states of thermal load and heat loss to the combustion chamber wall in a cycle is to measure the instantaneous temperature on the combustion chamber wall surface accurately and precisely using proper thin-film thermocouples, then to calculate the instantanenous heat flux flowing into the wall surface by means of numerical analysis. However, it is necessary to pay adequate attention to the effects of thermophysical properties of the thermocouple materials on the measured values, since any thermocouple consists of several kinds of materials which are different from those of portions to be measured.
Technical Paper

A Study of Heat Rejection and Combustion Characteristics of a Low-temperature and Pre-mixed Combustion Concept Based on Measurement of Instantaneous Heat Flux in a Direct-Injection Diesel Engine

2000-10-16
2000-01-2792
There have been strong demands recently for reductions in the fuel consumption and exhaust emissions of diesel engines from the standpoints of conserving energy and curbing global warming. A great deal of research is being done on new emission control technologies using direct-injection (DI) diesel engines that provide high thermal efficiency. This work includes dramatic improvements in the combustion process. The authors have developed a new combustion concept called Modulated Kinetics (MK), which reduces smoke and NOx levels simultaneously by reconciling low-temperature combustion with pre-mixed combustion [1, 2]. At present, research is under way on the second generation of MK combustion with the aim of improving emission performance further and achieving higher thermal efficiency [3]. Reducing heat rejection in the combustion chamber is effective in improving the thermal efficiency of DI diesel engines as well as that of MK combustion.
Technical Paper

Heat Transfer into Ceramic Combustion Wall of Internal Combustion Engines

1987-02-01
870153
A thin film thermocouple with a high accuracy was developed by means of computer analysis, which allowed measurements of instantaneous temperatures and heat fluxes on combustion chamber walls. Conventional Al-alloy and ceramic plates were compared in terms of the heat loss at the upper surface of each piston during combustion, using a gasoline engine and a diesel engine in the series of experiments. It was found by the comparison that the ceramic plates subjected to higher temperatures had greater heat losses in both the gasoline and diesel engines contrary to the anticipation.
Technical Paper

Effects of Flame Motion and Temperature on Local Wall Heat Transfer in a Rapid Compression-Expansion Machine Simulating Diesel Combustion

1992-10-01
922208
Local heat flux from the flame to the combustion chamber wall, q̇, was measured the wall surfaces of a rapid compression-expansion machine which can simulate diesel combustion. Temperature of the flame zone, T1, was calculated by a thermodynamic two-zone model using measured values of cylinder pressure and flame volume. A local heat transfer coefficient was proposed which is defined as q̇/(T1-Tw). Experiments showed that the local heat transfer coefficient depends slightly on the temperature difference, T1-Tw, but depends significantly on the velocity of the flame which contacts the wall surface.
Technical Paper

High Temperature Diesel Combustion in a Rapid Compression-Expansion Machine

1991-09-01
911845
According to previous papers on the combustion process in LHR diesel engines the combustion seems to deteriorate in LHR diesel engines. However it has been unclear whether this was caused by the high temperature gas or high temperature combustion chamber walls. This study was intended to investigate the effect of gas temperature on the rate of heat release through the heat release analysis and other measurements using a rapid compression-expansion machine. Experiments conducted at high gas temperatures which was achieved by the employment of oxygen-argon-helium mixture made it clear that the combustion at a high gas temperature condition deteriorated actually and this was probably due to the poorer mixing rate because of the increase in gas viscosity at a high gas temperature condition.
Technical Paper

Heat Transfer From Impinging Diesel Flames to the Combustion Chamber Wall

1997-02-24
970896
The local heat fluxes from impinging combusting and evaporating diesel sprays to the wall of a square combustion chamber were measured in a rapid compression machine. It was revealed that the ratio of local heat flux between the combusting and evaporating spray, q̇c/q̇e, is of the same order of magnitude as (Tc-Tw)/(Te-Tw) and its values estimated by a two-zone model agree roughly with the measured ones. The time-mean local heat flux during the spray impingement was found to be approximately proportional to the 0.8th power of the injection velocity and the heat-transfer phenomenon depends largely on whether the ignition starts before or after the impingement.
X