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Journal Article

Improve Heat Resistance of Composite Engine Cowlings Using Ceramic Coating Materials, Experimental Design and Testing

2018-06-04
Abstract A large amount of heat generated in the engineering compartment in a hovering helicopter may lead to premature degradation of inner skin of its engine cowling and cause serious failure on the engine cowling. This study proposes a solution of improving heat resistance of the helicopter engine cowlings by replacing the currently used intumescent coating with a ceramic coating material, Cerakote C-7700Q. Oven and flame tests were designed and conducted to evaluate the heat resistance of Cerakote C-7700Q. The test results show that the currently used painting scheme of the engine cowlings failed the 220°C oven test while after replacing the epoxy seal coat with the Cerakote, the new painting system passed the 220°C test in regards to painting bubbling. Based on that, a new painting scheme with C-7700Q implemented was recommended.
Journal Article

Modeling of Ducted-Fan and Motor in an Electric Aircraft and a Preliminary Integrated Design

2018-10-04
Abstract Electric ducted-fans with high power density are widely used in hybrid aircraft, electric aircraft, and VTOL vehicles. For the state-of-the-art electric ducted-fan, motor cooling restricts the power density increase. A motor design model based on the fan hub-to-tip ratio proposed in this article reveals that the thermal coupling effect between fan aerodynamic design and motor cooling design has great potential to increase the power density of the motor in an electric propulsion system. A smaller hub-to-tip ratio is preferred as long as the power balance and cooling balance are satisfied. Parametric study on a current 6 kW electric ducted-fan system shows that the highest motor power density could be increased by 246% based on the current technology. Finally, a preliminary design was obtained and experiments were conducted to prove the feasibility of the model.
Journal Article

Design and Experiment on Aircraft Electromechanical Actuator Fan at Different Altitudes and Rotational Speeds

2019-06-07
Abstract For electromechanical actuators (EMAs) and electronic devices cooling on aircraft, there is a need to study cooling fan performance at various altitudes from sea level to 12,000 m where the ambient pressure varies from 1 to 0.2 atm. As fan static pressure head is proportional to air density, the fan’s rotational speed has to be increased significantly to compensate for the low ambient pressure of 0.2 atm at the altitude of 12,000 m. To evaluate fan performance for EMA cooling, a high-rotational-speed, commercially available fan made by Ametek with a diameter of ~82 mm and ~3 m3/min zero-load open cooling flow rate when operating at 20,000 rpm was chosen as the baseline. According to fan scaling laws, this fan was expected to meet the cooling needs for an EMA when operating at 0.2 atm. Using a closed flow loop, the performance of the fan operating in the above ambient pressure range and at a rotational speed between 15,000 and 30,000 rpm was evaluated.
Journal Article

High Power-Density, High Efficiency, Mechanically Assisted, Turbocharged Direct-Injection Jet-Ignition Engines for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

2019-05-02
Abstract More than a decade ago, we proposed combined use of direct injection (DI) and jet ignition (JI) to produce high efficiency, high power-density, positive-ignition (PI), lean burn stratified, internal combustion engines (ICEs). Adopting this concept, the latest FIA F1 engines, which are electrically assisted, turbocharged, directly injected, jet ignited, gasoline engines and work lean stratified in a highly boosted environment, have delivered peak power fuel conversion efficiencies well above 46%, with specific power densities more than 340 kW/liter. The concept, further evolved, is here presented for unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) applications. Results of simulations for a new DI JI ICE with rotary valve, being super-turbocharged and having gasoline or methanol as working fuel, show the opportunity to achieve even larger power densities, up to 430 kW/liter, while delivering a near-constant torque and, consequently, a nearly linear power curve over a wide range of speeds.
Journal Article

Microturbine Blade Cooling

2020-05-20
Abstract The main technical barrier to commercial use of microturbines is its low efficiency, not exceeding 15%. Efficiency and specific power are as high as the Turbine Inlet Temperature (TIT), generally limited to 950°C in microturbines, as its tiny rotors make internal blade cooling impossible. This work uses Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to develop an external cooling system of the blades of a microturbine by incorporating a compressor into the disk to blow air over the blades’ walls. The engine used as the basis of the work is the FD-3/64. The work was divided into two steps. In the first, Step 1, the reactive flow in the combustor was simulated to obtain the boundary conditions for Step 2. In Step 2, the flow through the turbine wheel during rotation is simulated. Four rotor models were simulated.
Journal Article

3D-CFD-Study of Aerodynamic Losses in Compressor Impellers

2018-07-05
Abstract Due to the increasing requirements for efficiency, the wide range of characteristics and the improved possibilities of modern development and production processes, compressors in turbochargers have become more individualized in order to adapt to the requirements of internal combustion engines. An understanding of the working mechanisms as well as an understanding of the way that losses occur in the flow allows a reduced development effort during the optimization process. This article presents three-dimensional (3D) Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) investigations of the loss mechanisms and quantitative calculations of individual losses. The 3D-CFD method used in this article will reduce the drawbacks of one-dimensional calculation as far as possible. For example, the twist of the blades is taken into account and the “discrete” method is used for loss calculation instead of the “average” method.
Journal Article

Development of a Standard Testing Method for Vehicle Cabin Air Quality Index

2019-05-20
Abstract Vehicle cabin air quality depends on various parameters such as number of passengers, fan speed, and vehicle speed. In addition to controlling the temperature inside the vehicle, HVAC control system has evolved to improve cabin air quality as well. However, there is no standard test method to ensure reliable and repeatable comparison among different cars. The current study defined Cabin Air Quality Index (CAQI) and proposed a test method to determine CAQI. CAQIparticles showed dependence on the choice of metrics among particle number (PN), particle surface area (PS), and particle mass (PM). CAQIparticles is less than 1 while CAQICO2 is larger than 1. The proposed test method is promising but needs further improvement for smaller coefficient of variations (COVs).
Journal Article

Implementation and Optimization of a Variable-Speed Coolant Pump in a Powertrain Cooling System

2020-02-07
Abstract This study investigates methods to precisely control a coolant pump in an internal combustion engine. The goal of this research is to minimize power consumption while still meeting optimal performance, reliability and durability requirements for an engine at all engine-operating conditions. This investigation achieves reduced fuel consumption, reduced emissions, and improved powertrain performance. Secondary impacts include cleaner air for the earth, reduced operating costs for the owner, and compliance with US regulatory requirements. The study utilizes mathematical modeling of the cooling system using heat transfer, pump laws, and boiling analysis to set limits to the cooling system and predict performance changes.
Journal Article

Modelling of a Variable Displacement Lubricating Pump with Air Dissolution Dynamics

2018-04-18
Abstract The simulation of lubricating pumps for internal combustion engines has always represented a challenge due to the high aeration level of the working fluid. In fact, the delivery pressure ripple is highly influenced by the effective fluid bulk modulus, which is significantly reduced by the presence of separated air. This paper presents a detailed lumped parameter model of a variable displacement vane pump with a two-level pressure setting, in which the fluid model takes into account the dynamics of release and dissolution of the air in the oil. The pump was modelled in the LMS Imagine.Lab Amesim® environment through customized libraries for the evaluation of the main geometric features. The model was validated experimentally in terms of pressure oscillations in conditions of low and high aeration. The fraction of separated air in the reservoir of the test rig was measured by means of an X-ray technique.
Journal Article

Influence of Miller Cycles on Engine Air Flow

2018-04-18
Abstract The influence of the intake valve lift of two Miller cycles on the in-cylinder flow field inside a DISI engine is studied experimentally since changes of the engine flow field directly affect the turbulent mixing and the combustion process. For the analysis of the impact of the valve timing on the general flow field topology and on the large-scale flow structures, high-speed stereo-scopic particle-image velocimetry measurements are conducted in the tumble plane and the cross-tumble plane. The direct comparison to a standard Otto intake valve lift curve reveals evidently different impacts on the flow field for both Miller cam shafts. A Miller cycle that features late intake valve closing shows a flow field comparable to the standard Otto valve timing and a tumble vortex of strong intensity can be identified.
Journal Article

Experimental Investigation of the Influence of Engine Operating Parameters on a Rankine Based Waste Heat Recovery System in a SI Engine

2018-04-18
Abstract One of the most promising techniques to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions of future combustion engines is the use of waste heat from exhaust gas with a Rankine cycle. The target of this study was to investigate the influence of engine operating parameters such as ignition timing, coolant temperature and injection parameters on the efficiency and performance of Rankine based waste heat recovery systems (WHR). This was done to gain basic knowledge about the influences of the engine operating parameters which helps to explain the system behavior under different operating conditions and second to identify the operating parameters with the highest overall system efficiency which can be used to highlight the impact of changes in engine application on the car. These first of a kind tests were performed on a state-of-the-art gasoline engine equipped with a prototype Rankine-system.
Journal Article

Co-Simulation Study of the Split-Crankshaft Engine’s Electromechanical Clutch Unit

2018-03-23
Abstract The main objective of active downsizing is to increase the power train efficiency. In order to consistently enhance an approach of active downsizing, it is inevitable to disable and additionally to disengage part of the overall engine displacement volume. The disengagement avoids the friction loss of the piston group as well as its crank- and valve-train section. Therefore, this beneficial approach, the Split-Crankshaft Engine (SCE) is currently under development at the Chair of Internal Combustion Engines in cooperation with the Gear Research Centre (FZG), at the Technical University of Munich. The SCE concept consists of two partial internal combustion engines, which are arranged inline. The Primary Engine (PE) is permanently running while the Secondary Engine (SE) can be switched on and off load-dependently during driving operation.
Journal Article

Internal Combustion Engine Cylinder Volume Trace Deviation

2018-04-18
Abstract Heat release analysis is a widely used cylinder pressure-based method for evaluating combustion in engine development, and it is also being investigated as a means to control engine combustion. Heat release analysis has been shown to be sensitive to errors in the calculated cylinder volume, but despite this one of the most common assumptions is that the cylinder volume is nominal and can be calculated solely by the geometrical relations among the measures of the engine components. During engine operation, the components surrounding the combustion chamber are exposed to thermal forces, pressure forces, and mass forces from the reciprocating components. Due to these forces, the components will deform and the volume of the combustion chamber will deviate from its ideal volume. The volume will also be affected by the production tolerances of the engine.
Journal Article

Partial Transparency of Advanced Compression Ignition Combustion Chamber Deposits, Its Impact on Combustion Chamber Wall Temperatures and Application to Thermal Barrier Coating Design

2018-04-18
Abstract The proven impact of combustion chamber deposits, CCD, on advanced compression ignition, ACI, combustion strategies has spurred researchers to develop thermal barrier coatings, TBC, which can mimic CCD benefits on combustion efficiency and operational range expansion. However, application of TBCs within multi-mode engines exposes them to non-negligible soot radiation. In the present paper, the impact of radiation heat transfer on combustion chamber deposits is studied. The morphological construction of the combustion chamber deposit layer is shown to be partially transparent to radiation heat transfer, drawing corollaries with ceramic-based TBCs. Additional experimentation eliminates the optical transparency of CCD to reveal an “effective radiation penetration depth” facilitated by open surface porosity. The effective radiation penetration depth is then utilized to establish the relative communicating porosity of CCD and a magnesium zirconate TBC.
Journal Article

Analysis of Regulated Pollutant Emissions and Aftertreatment Efficiency in a GTDi Engine Using Different SOI Strategies

2018-06-25
Abstract In order to improve performance and minimize pollutant emissions in gasoline turbocharged direct-injection (GTDi) engines, different injection strategies and technologies are being investigated. The inclusion of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and the variation of the start of injection (SOI) are some of these strategies that can influence the air-to-fuel (AF) mixture formation and consequently in the combustion process and pollutant emissions. This paper presents a complete study of the engine performance, pollutant emissions and aftertreatment efficiency that produces the SOI variation with a fixed EGR rate in a 4-cylinder, turbocharged, gasoline direct-injection engine with 2.0 L displacement. The equipment used in this study are TSI-EEPS for particle measurement and HORIBA MEXA 1230-PM for soot measurement being HORIBA MEXA 7100-DEGR with a heated line selector the system employed for regulated gaseous emission measurement and aftertreatment evaluation.
Journal Article

Development of an Overhead Camshaft System Adapted to an SAE Supermileage Single-Person Vehicle in a Fuel Economy Perspective

2018-06-18
Abstract This article presents a comparative study between two camshafts systems adapted to the single cylinder engine of a Supermileage vehicle in a fuel economy perspective. One system is from a Honda AF70E engine and the other is a new design. The new camshaft system was improved for fuel economy by developing a new camshaft that enhances volumetric efficiency while reducing friction losses. The comparison was made by measuring the efficiency of the engine in the speed range where the engine was used by the Supermileage vehicle and a calculation was made to show which of the configuration is best for the vehicle.
Journal Article

Joint Mechanism and Prediction of Strength for a Radial Knurling Connection of Assembled Camshaft Using a Subsequent Modeling Approach

2018-06-25
Abstract Knurling joint applied in assembled camshaft has developed rapidly in recent years, which have exhibited great advantages against conventional joint methods in the aspects of automation, joint precision, thermal damage, noise, and near net shape forming. Both quality of assembly process and joint strength are the key requirements for manufacturing a reliable assembled camshaft. In this article, a finite element predictive approach including three subsequent models (knurling, press-fit and torsion strength) has been established. Johnson-Cook material model has been used to simulate the severe plastic deformation of the material. The residual stress field calculated from the knurling process was transferred as initial condition to the press-fit model to predict the press-fit load. The predicted press-fit load, torque strength and displacement of cam profile before failure were calculated.
Journal Article

WM-LES-Simulation of a Generic Intake Port Geometry

2018-06-18
Abstract Fluid mechanical design of the cylinder charge motion is an important part of an engine development. In the present contribution an intake port geometry is proposed that can be used as a test case for intake port flow simulations. The objective is to fill the gap between generic test cases, such as the backward facing step or the sudden expansion, and simulations of proprietary intake ports, which are barely accessible in the community. For the intake geometry measurement data was generated on a flow-through test bench and a wall-modeled LES-simulation using a hybrid RANS/LES approach for near-wall regions was conducted. The objective is to generate and analyze a reference flow case. Since mesh convergence studies are too costly for scale resolving approaches only one simulation was done, but on a very fine and mostly block-structured numerical mesh to achieve minimal numerical dissipation.
Journal Article

Limitations of Two-Stage Turbocharging at High Flight Altitudes

2018-09-17
Abstract High-altitude long-endurance (HALE) unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) are used for high flight altitudes, which enable low drag and fast flight with minimal fuel consumption. Two-stage turbocharging is necessary to sustain sea-level power at high flight altitudes. In this study, the limitations of two-stage turbocharging at high flight altitudes typical for HALE UAVs are analyzed for the first time. The obtained results show that the minimum available engine power increases as the altitude rises. This will limit the ability of the aircraft to descend rapidly. Furthermore, at high altitudes, if a lower operating point is required for a fast descent, further recovery to full power for climbing or cruising could be unavailable. In the latter cases, a lower altitude must be reached before full power would be available again. A basic algorithm for the assessment and analysis of the limitations of UAV engines with two-stage turbochargers operating at high altitudes is suggested.
Journal Article

Conditioning Turbocharger Compressor Map Data for Use in Engine Performance Simulation

2018-08-08
Abstract Turbocharger compressor maps are used in engine performance modeling and simulation to predict engine air system operating conditions. Errors in compressor map data can result in inaccurate engine performance prediction. A method is described for conditioning compressor map data for use in engine performance simulation, by detecting and replacing suspect data points, and interpolating and extrapolating the map data. The method first characterizes enthalpy rise through the compressor, after removing data points likely influenced by heat transfer from turbine to compressor, using energy transfer coefficient vs. impeller outlet flow coefficient. This is done concurrently with estimating impeller outlet conditions using simplified geometry assumptions and a modified definition for compressor stage reaction.
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