Refine Your Search

Topic

Author

Affiliation

Search Results

Technical Paper

Actuation and Fastening With Shape Memory Alloys in the Automotive Industry

1996-04-01
91A103
As a result of a phase transformation, shape memory alloys can change their shape when the temperature changes. This unusual effect can be utilized in actuation and fastening components for automotive applications. Springs made from Ni-Ti shape memory alloys change their rate in a predetermined temperature range due to a significant change in the elastic modules of the material. They can be used as sensor-actuators in pressures control valves or oil cooler by-pass valves in automatic transmissions or to compensate for oil viscosity changes in shock absorbers or thermal expansion of dissimilar materials in gear boxes. If the recovery is constrained, i.e., shape memory element is physically prevented from returning into its original shape, a potentially high stress is generated. This effect is used in fastener rings. Fasteners made from Ni-Ti alloys provide high reliability and easy installation for braid terminations, locating of shaft mounted components, connectors and hose clamps.
Technical Paper

A Driving Simulator Using Microprocessors

1988-03-01
871156
An inexpensive driving simulation system with sufficient fidelity has been developed. The system produces motion cues of four degrees of freedom, visual and auditory cues, and control feel on the steering wheel. This paper describes the features of this newly developed system and gives examples that demonstrate its effectiveness. The motion cues provided in this system are yaw, heave, and lateral and fore/aft accelerations. The lateral and fore/aft accelerations are simulated by tilting the simulator compartment. A computer-processed road image is given through a CRT monitor. The restoring torque of the steering wheel is produced by an electrical servosystem via a coil spring. Cruising sound is given in order to improve speed perception. Since the system uses digital computers, the vehicle characteristics are altered easily by merely rewriting the software. This enables us to simulate special vehicle dynamics such as front & rear wheel steering.
Technical Paper

A Study on the Performance of Guideway Bus Steering Control System

1988-03-01
871231
In this paper a computer simulation study on the effects of steering parameters on lateral dynamics of the guideway bus to contribute to a development practice of designing optimum steering control system are dealt with. A stability limit of vehicle lateral motion is analyzed and an emphasis is laid on the effects of moment of inertia of a conventional steering wheel and lateral elasticity of the guide rail which have proven to reduce the critical vehicle speed. It is pointed out conclusively that a normal bus equipped with additional simple guidance equipments can be guided smoothly on a simple guideway at adequately high vehicle speed.
Technical Paper

A Procedure for Evaluating Cycle Emissions from Raw Exhaust Gas Analyses

1988-03-01
871194
A procedure has been developed for evaluating equivalent drive cycle emission results from raw exhaust gas emissions data obtained from an engine under test on a computer controlled Vehicle Simulator Engine Dynamometer. The emitted species data is integrated with the air intake flow rate to determine the total mass of emissions, after correcting for the reduction in exhaust gas mass due to precipitation of the moisture of combustion. This procedure eliminates the need for the Constant Volume Sample (CVS) System attached to the vehicle exhaust while undergoing simulated drive testing on a chassis dynamometer to evaluate compliance of the test vehicle with the Australian Design Rules, ADR27 and ADR37. Sources of error with the procedure are examined by comparing the fuel consumption measured using a volumetric technique during the test with that evaluated by a carbon balance procedure as given in the Australian Design Rules.
Technical Paper

Integration of SEA Tire Model with Vehicle Model

1999-05-17
1999-01-1700
Statistical energy analysis (SEA) has recently emerged as an effective tool for design assessment in the automotive industry. Automotive OEM companies develop vehicle models to aid design of body and chassis systems. The tire and wheel suppliers develop and supply component models to OEM companies in the engineering stage. In the model development process, some information on the vehicle side or component side is necessary for model development and correlation. A suitable termination representation of the vehicle characteristics on the tire/wheel model is required. This termination should account for the dissipation of energy on vehicle body and chassis side, otherwise the component model will overestimate the vibration responses and energy levels. On the vehicle model side, a representative simplified tire/wheel model may be sufficient for full vehicle road noise simulation.
Technical Paper

Electric Vehicle Sound Quality

1999-05-17
1999-01-1694
Environmental concerns as well as regulatory requirements are driving the development of alternative vehicle propulsion systems. Electric vehicles (EV's) are attractive because they emit no pollutants. In this paper, we examine the sound quality characteristics of wind and powertrain noise in electric vehicles. Sound quality is an important attribute of EV's, because the expectation is that they will be very quiet due to the absence of an internal combustion engine. As we show in this paper, the absence of engine noise is both a blessing and a curse for sound quality. For wind noise, the results show that electric and gasoline vehicles have equivalent wind noise loudness levels at all speeds. However, at lower speeds (50-60 mph), the EV is judged to have more wind noise even though the level was the same as the gasoline vehicle! The difference is that, in the EV, there is no engine noise to mask the wind noise.
Technical Paper

A Novel Method and Product to Damp Cylindrical Articles: Constrained Layer Damping Tubing

1999-05-17
1999-01-1676
Constrained layer damping (CLD) is a well known technique to efficiently damp low frequency vibration. CLD employs a viscoelastic material sandwiched between two very stiff, typically metal, layers. While effective over essentially flat surfaces, CLD has not been applicable to cylindrical shapes. In order to damp low frequency vibration in metal pipes, users have been forced to rely on extensional layer damping, typically consisting of thick layers of extruded or molded rubbers. This paper discusses a novel product to damp cylindrical articles such as metal pipes with a constrained layer heat shrink tubing. This product utilizes a stiff heat shrinkable polymeric jacket bonded on the inside with a viscoelastic layer. When shrunk on a metal pipe or rod, a CLD system is produced. The product is typically thinner than an extensional layer damper and is more effective. It also meets the other physical and environmental requirements for a pipe covering.
Technical Paper

Experimental Determination of the Noise Emitting Parts of a Rotating Tire in the European Research Project TINO

1999-05-17
1999-01-1732
One of the objectives in the European Research project TINO is to identify, in detail, the surfaces of a rotating tire which actually generate the radiated noise. The approach is completely experimental and is based upon the ASQ (Airborne Sound Quantification) technique. The quantification of the contribution of the different tire surfaces to the sound pressure measured under defined conditions is carried out through a process of near-field measurements during rotation of the tire and static acoustic transfer function measurements. The ASQ method is further developed and tested when focussing at the applications. In first instance, the procedure has been validated and fine-tuned under well-controlled boundary conditions at a tire chassis dynamometer. The results of this first investigation served also as a “reference” set of data which has been used for verification and validation of numerical tire models.
Technical Paper

Brake Squeal Generation

1999-05-17
1999-01-1735
Brake squeal, which is a noise, occurs in the range of frequencies 1 to 16 kHz is an important task for research to develop the vehicle passenger comfort. This phenomena has been studied many years theoretically and experimentally to gain better performance of brake and eliminating the squeal problem. The work presented here is focusing on the effect of the brake pad manufacturing on the generation of brake squeal. A simple proposed three-degree of freedom model has been used in the study to simulate the brake components (pad, caliper, and disc). The brake squeal and frequency response of brake pad has been measured at different working conditions (pressure, sliding speed, and brake pad type). A comparison between the theoretical and experimental work has been made and a good agreement was found between the theoretical prediction of the brake assembly natural frequency and the experimental measurement.
Technical Paper

Tire/Road Interface Airborne Noise Characteristics Generation

1999-05-17
1999-01-1731
In recent years there has been much interest in problems involving the noise prediction and reduction inside and outside the vehicle. Tire/road exterior noise has been considered to be the major vehicle exterior noise source. However, this paper describes an investigation into the characteristics of the air pumping noise mechanism in terms of source locations and directionality. Some rubber tire/road air pumping noise measurements are presented, whereas some predicted results are computed based on the boundary element method (BEM) to display some parameters which are found to be difficult to be obtained experimentally.
Technical Paper

Tire/Pavement Interaction Noise Source Identification Using Multi-Planar Nearfield Acoustical Holography

1999-05-17
1999-01-1733
In this study, multi-planar Nearfield Acoustical Holography (NAH) is used to investigate noise radiated from the front, side and rear areas of single tires on a two-wheel trailer. Contributions to the radiated noise from the leading edge, trailing edge, and sidewall of the tire are identified. Two tires - an experimental monopitch tire and a production passenger car tire - are evaluated on a smooth asphalt pavement at 58 km/hr. From the measured complex pressure, acoustic intensity is reconstructed on three planes surrounding the tire using modified NAH procedures. Additionally, sound power levels are presented in tabulated and spectra forms. Tire noise generating mechanisms are inferred based on the results.
Technical Paper

The Reality of Problem Solving

1999-05-10
1999-01-1626
Structured problem solving methods are utilized in the automotive industry for the efficient resolution of quality issues in manufacturing. Several problem solving methodologies have been developed, each with the same basic philosophy to prevent problem reoccurrence. Numerous barriers inhibit the effectiveness of problem solving. Although some tactical barriers may be overcome by training personnel, the majority of barriers are strategic or cultural in nature. Barriers at these two levels can only be removed by management level personnel. Management must shift its focus from firefighting to problem prevention. This shift can only be realized if problem prevention is addressed during design.
Technical Paper

The Effects of Retained Fluid and Humidity on the Evacuation of Critical Vehicle Systems

1999-05-10
1999-01-1630
In automotive assembly facilities worldwide, many critical vehicle systems such as brakes, power steering, radiator, and air conditioning require the appropriate fluid to function. In order to insure that these critical vehicle systems receive the correct amount of properly treated fluid, automotive manufacturers employ a method called Evacuation and Fill. Due to their closed-loop design, many critical vehicle systems must be first exposed to vacuum prior to being flooded with fluid. Only after the evacuation and fill process is complete will the critical vehicle system be able to perform as specified. It has long been thought, but never proven, that humidity and entrenched fluid were major hindrances to the Evacuation and Fill process. Consequently, Ford Motor Company Advanced Manufacturing Technology Development, Sandalwood Enterprises, Kettering University, and Dominion Tool & Die conducted a detailed project on this subject.
Technical Paper

Application of Shape Memory Alloys for Leading Edge Deicing

1999-04-20
1999-01-1585
Ice accumulation on aircraft wings during flight is a dangerous situation. To deal with this problem, current deicing systems either prevent ice accumulation by heating or break the ice layer once it is formed by dynamic motion of a leading edge device such as a boot. These systems may be deficient due to excessive energy requirements or ineffectiveness. In this project, the feasibility of using shape memory alloy (SMA) composite material for deicing purposes is investigated. SMA such as Nitinol wire has an unusual characteristic where it can be trained to generate a compressive strain upon application of an electric current through the wire. Several different versions of two inch radius semi-circular SMA composite specimen were manufactured and tested at Wichita State University. Ice was successfully shed in static icing tests while each of the subsequent versions reduced the power input requirement.
Technical Paper

A New Light Weight, High Performance, Spray Applied Automotive Damping Material

1999-05-17
1999-01-1674
A new multifunctional material was developed to provide corrosion protection, anti-chip protection and vibration damping equal to or better than the existing materials today. This multifunctional coating, applied robotically or manually with airless spray equipment, is a one component system and provides the following characteristics: high vibration damping, low viscosity-easy to process, low shrinkage-no small molecules given off, no solvents, excellent adhesion to oily steel and electrocoat, excellent stone-chip resistance, high stiffness and low density. This paper describes the application and performance benefits of utilizing this sprayable, chip-resistance damper.
Technical Paper

Lean Ergonomics: Twelve Simple Rules to Fit Jobs to People

1999-05-10
1999-01-1636
This paper provides twelve rules to help reduce four key ergonomic risk factors (force, frequency, posture and mechanical stress). These rules were developed to assist individuals who may not have received extensive ergonomic training but who are involved in implementing any changes (major or minor) to manufacturing work stations. This includes changes in task and/or changes in equipment. A complete ergonomic analysis of a work situation is a good idea in most cases, but these rules will avoid many of the commonly occurring problems if applied early in the design or modification of a workplace.
Technical Paper

Preparing for High Performance Work Organizations – The UDM / GC Bachelor of Manufacturing Engineering Program

1999-05-10
1999-01-1637
There are many analogies between the development of education and industrial development in the United States during the 1900s. In both segments of our society the emphasis on quantity of output led to the use of ever more specialized tools and concepts with sub-optimization often reducing the overall output quality. More recently both education and industry, especially the manufacturing sector, have recognized the value added concepts of integration, i.e., applying a holistic approach to their operations. In so doing a new workplace has been defined, the “High Performance Work Organization” (HPWO) (1). The discussion of the effects this development has had on manufacturing of goods and services is left to other presentations in this conference. This presentation focuses on an example from education which illustrates how integration of experiential and academic activities has been set as the cornerstone of a new construct for engineering education.
Technical Paper

Gaining Engineering Competence in Plastics

1999-05-10
1999-01-1641
Plastics are largely regarded as commodity materials. However, they differ considerably from the materials which we became acquainted with during our college education. Although one can proceed to design plastic components and manufacture them without seriously considering a training program, the consequences can be substantial sacrifices to quality, development cost, part cost, and time to market, as well as adding a great deal of unnecessary stress to the workplace. This presentation explains why plastics are different and recommends a training curriculum that should be a part of strategic planning.
Technical Paper

Graduate Education in Manufacturing Engineering for the Automotive Industry of the Future

1999-05-10
1999-01-1638
This paper discusses the evolution of graduate education in manufacturing engineering and the curriculum needed to educate manufacturing engineers in the automotive industry. This paper examines the master's and doctoral curriculum in manufacturing engineering at the University of Michigan-Dearborn. Finally, it proposes future direction for graduate education in manufacturing that will be needed for the automotive industry of the future.
Technical Paper

A Non-Averaging Method of Determining the Rheological Properties of Traction Fluids

1999-05-03
1999-01-1518
Traction machines have been frequently used to study the rheological properties of lubricants in elasto-hydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) contacts. Fundamental properties are inferred from EHL traction measurements based on the average pressures and temperatures in the contact. This average approach leads to uncertainty in the accuracy of the results due to the highly nonlinear response of fluid rheological behavior to both pressure and temperature. A non-averaging method is developed in this paper to determine the elastic and plastic properties of traction fluids operating in EHL contacts at small slide-to-roll ratios. A precision line-contact traction rig is used to measure the EHL traction at a given oil temperature and Hertz pressure. By choosing a sensible pressure-property expression, the parameters of the expression can be determined through the initial slope and peak traction coefficient of the traction measurements.
X