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Technical Paper

Surface Treatments and Characterization of Electroplated and Hot Dip Galvanized Steel Sheets

1996-04-01
91A126
Protection of surfaces is a critical factor in determining the extended service life of a structure in polluted and aggressive environments. In particular, a rapid growth of the technology for the protecting coating of cold rolled steel is experienced, for the use in transport, electric housewares, building and industrial plants. Numerous changes have taken place in the production of zinc coatings on steel in order to improve the corrosion resistance using zinc alloy platings. Our research group collected from the international production a number of selected galvanized steel samples, including electrodeposited zinc alloys, multilayer coatings, hot dip galvanized steels. On the selected materials we established and analyzed morphology, composition, crystal structure, impurity content and distribution, using many surface microanalysis techniques.
Technical Paper

State of the Art in the Use of Stainless Steel for Bus and Car Parts Manufacture

1996-04-01
91A127
The paper describes recent developments in the use of stainless steel to make the parts of buses which are most liable to corrosion. Sheet metal is used for the outer panelling, and square and rectangular tubes for the body. The types of steel used and their fabrication are analyzed. Finally, a brief description is given of the stainless steels used to make car exhaust systems.
Technical Paper

Thermomechanical Behavior and Wear Resistance of Whisker Or Particle Reinforced Ceramics

1996-04-01
91A107
Ceramic composite materials have been intensively studied during the last years. Particles and whisker reinforcement have shown the simultaneous advantage to allow the preparation of composite materials by conventional processing and to lead, when under optimum conditions, to dramatic toughening and strengthening. Since wear resistance of brittle material have been shown to be related to both hardness and toughness, composite materials with improved were resistance have been developed for cutting tools or bearing applications. However the mechanism responsible for toughening is of major important for wear resistance effectiveness. We have therefore reviewed the main mechanisms before presenting some examples of composites materials for wear resistance applications.
Technical Paper

Casting and Characterization of An Aluminum Alloy Car Engine Bracket Produced By Squeeze Casting Technology

1996-04-01
91A114
The following paper describes the experimental activity regarding the setting-up and characterization of a car engine bracket in Al-Si12Cu2FeZn-F alloy produced by the new technology squeeze casting. LExperimentation was carried out at the Alures squeeze casting pilot plant. Static and dynamic characterization (fatigue resistance on test samples and the component itself) was carried out at Teksid and Fiat Auto. Characterization test have demonstrated the considerable advantages offered by the new technology compared with conventional production processes.
Technical Paper

Critical Issue Relating to the Quality of Properties Data

1996-04-01
91A091
The generation of properties data on plastics falls short of what the designers and producers of end-products would prefer. The fundamental causes of this mismatch are examined and possible corrective actions are proposed with some data on impact resistance given to illustrate key points.
Technical Paper

A Driving Simulator Using Microprocessors

1988-03-01
871156
An inexpensive driving simulation system with sufficient fidelity has been developed. The system produces motion cues of four degrees of freedom, visual and auditory cues, and control feel on the steering wheel. This paper describes the features of this newly developed system and gives examples that demonstrate its effectiveness. The motion cues provided in this system are yaw, heave, and lateral and fore/aft accelerations. The lateral and fore/aft accelerations are simulated by tilting the simulator compartment. A computer-processed road image is given through a CRT monitor. The restoring torque of the steering wheel is produced by an electrical servosystem via a coil spring. Cruising sound is given in order to improve speed perception. Since the system uses digital computers, the vehicle characteristics are altered easily by merely rewriting the software. This enables us to simulate special vehicle dynamics such as front & rear wheel steering.
Technical Paper

“Passenger Vehicle Petrol Consumption - Measurement in the Real World”

1988-03-01
871159
A survey of the in-service fuel consumption of passenger vehicles and derivatives in the Australian fleet was carried out in 1984-85. Seven hundred and four owners across Australia took part in the survey. Vehicle owners reported by questionnaire the amount of fuel used during four tank fills of normal operation, the distance travelled, and other details of the operating circumstances. The survey shows a clear downward trend in the fuel consumption of the Australian passenger fleet. The data also provides comparisons of actual fuel consumption obtained on the road, with laboratory derived values for fuel consumption. Vehicles in a sub-set of 40 were fitted with fuel flow meters during the survey and tested to Australian Standard 2077 for fuel consumption. The questionnaire method is shown to be a valid and accurate technique for determining in-service fuel consumption.
Technical Paper

A Study on the Performance of Guideway Bus Steering Control System

1988-03-01
871231
In this paper a computer simulation study on the effects of steering parameters on lateral dynamics of the guideway bus to contribute to a development practice of designing optimum steering control system are dealt with. A stability limit of vehicle lateral motion is analyzed and an emphasis is laid on the effects of moment of inertia of a conventional steering wheel and lateral elasticity of the guide rail which have proven to reduce the critical vehicle speed. It is pointed out conclusively that a normal bus equipped with additional simple guidance equipments can be guided smoothly on a simple guideway at adequately high vehicle speed.
Technical Paper

Electric Vehicle Sound Quality

1999-05-17
1999-01-1694
Environmental concerns as well as regulatory requirements are driving the development of alternative vehicle propulsion systems. Electric vehicles (EV's) are attractive because they emit no pollutants. In this paper, we examine the sound quality characteristics of wind and powertrain noise in electric vehicles. Sound quality is an important attribute of EV's, because the expectation is that they will be very quiet due to the absence of an internal combustion engine. As we show in this paper, the absence of engine noise is both a blessing and a curse for sound quality. For wind noise, the results show that electric and gasoline vehicles have equivalent wind noise loudness levels at all speeds. However, at lower speeds (50-60 mph), the EV is judged to have more wind noise even though the level was the same as the gasoline vehicle! The difference is that, in the EV, there is no engine noise to mask the wind noise.
Technical Paper

Characterizing the In Vehicle Performance of Expandable Sealants Used As Acoustic Baffles

1999-05-17
1999-01-1687
Chemically and heat reactive, expandable sealants are used as “acoustical baffles” in the automotive industry. These acoustic baffles are used to impede noise, water and dust propagation inside of structural components and body cavities. Use of these sealant materials has grown significantly as the demands to improve vehicle acoustic performance has increased. Various test methods have been developed to quantify the performance of these materials through direct comparison of material samples. These investigations use standardized testing procedures to characterize the acoustic performance of a material sample on the basis of controlled laboratory test conditions. This paper presents a step in the progression of evaluating acoustic baffle performance in the vehicle. Standard experimental techniques are used to investigate the influence of the baffles on the vehicle acoustic performance.
Technical Paper

Acoustical Selection of Class 8 Truck Floormats

1999-05-17
1999-01-1688
Class 8 truck manufacturers use a wide variety of materials for cab floor construction. These include traditional steel and aluminum plate as well as aluminum honey-comb and balsa wood core composites. Each of these materials has unique transmission loss properties. The acoustical performance of the floor system, (cab floor, decoupler, and barrier) depends not only on the acoustical performance of the decoupler and barrier, but also on the cab floor material. This paper outlines an experimental technique for selecting an acoustical floormat system utilizing vehicle and laboratory tests that takes these factors into account.
Technical Paper

Experimental Determination of the Noise Emitting Parts of a Rotating Tire in the European Research Project TINO

1999-05-17
1999-01-1732
One of the objectives in the European Research project TINO is to identify, in detail, the surfaces of a rotating tire which actually generate the radiated noise. The approach is completely experimental and is based upon the ASQ (Airborne Sound Quantification) technique. The quantification of the contribution of the different tire surfaces to the sound pressure measured under defined conditions is carried out through a process of near-field measurements during rotation of the tire and static acoustic transfer function measurements. The ASQ method is further developed and tested when focussing at the applications. In first instance, the procedure has been validated and fine-tuned under well-controlled boundary conditions at a tire chassis dynamometer. The results of this first investigation served also as a “reference” set of data which has been used for verification and validation of numerical tire models.
Technical Paper

Tire/Pavement Interaction Noise Source Identification Using Multi-Planar Nearfield Acoustical Holography

1999-05-17
1999-01-1733
In this study, multi-planar Nearfield Acoustical Holography (NAH) is used to investigate noise radiated from the front, side and rear areas of single tires on a two-wheel trailer. Contributions to the radiated noise from the leading edge, trailing edge, and sidewall of the tire are identified. Two tires - an experimental monopitch tire and a production passenger car tire - are evaluated on a smooth asphalt pavement at 58 km/hr. From the measured complex pressure, acoustic intensity is reconstructed on three planes surrounding the tire using modified NAH procedures. Additionally, sound power levels are presented in tabulated and spectra forms. Tire noise generating mechanisms are inferred based on the results.
Technical Paper

Seat Belt Retractor Rattle: Understanding Root Sources and Testing Methods

1999-05-17
1999-01-1729
This paper describes the rattle mechanisms that exist in seat belt retractors and the vehicle acceleration conditions that induce these responses. Three principal sources of rattle include: 1) the sensor, 2) the spool, and 3) the lock pawl. In-vehicle acceleration measurements are used to characterize retractor excitation and are subsequently employed for laboratory testing of retractor rattle. The merits and demerits of two testing methods, based on frequency domain and time domain shaker control, are discussed.
Technical Paper

Threshold Level as an Index of Squeak and Rattle Performance

1999-05-17
1999-01-1730
A practical approach for evaluating and validating global system designs for Squeak and Rattle performance is proposed. Using simple slip and rattle models, actual sound and vibration data, and the fundamentals of audiological perception, analysis tools adapted from Chaos Theory are used to establish threshold levels of performance and identify system characteristics which are significant contributors to Squeak and Rattle. Focus on system design is maintained by using a simple rattle noise indicator and relating rattle events to levels of dynamic motion (acceleration, velocity, etc.). The threshold level is defined as the level of acceleration at which the system moves from a non-rattling state to a rattling state. The approach is demonstrated with a simple analytical model applied to an experimental structure under dynamic load.
Technical Paper

Case History: Engine Timing Gear Noise Reduction

1999-05-17
1999-01-1716
This paper describes the procedures used to reduce the tonal noise of a class eight truck engine timing gear train that was initially found to be objectionable under idle operating conditions. Initial measurements showed that the objectionable sounds were related to the fundamental gear mesh frequency, and its second and third harmonics. Experimental and computational procedures used to study and trouble-shoot the problem include vibration and sound measurements, transmission error analysis of the gears under light load condition, and a dynamic analysis of the drive system. Detail applications of these techniques are described in this paper.
Technical Paper

Accessory Drive Belt Pulley Entry Friction Study and Belt Chirp Noise

1999-05-17
1999-01-1709
Accessory belt “chirp” noise is a major quality issue in the automotive and truck industry. Chirp noise control is often achieved by very tight pulley alignment, a guideline being .33 degree maximum belt entry angle into each grooved pulley. Occasionally belts will chirp at pulleys where the system alignment is this good or better. This study offers an explanation for such occurrences. This is a study to see if fundament groove side sticking theory correlates with the belt entry angle, and how the coefficient of friction relates to this entry angle. The study combines theory with lab data. In summary, the study fundamentally links the coefficient of friction of the belt to the belt chirp noise phenomenon, and allows the projection of a belt's general tendency to chirp to be predicted by the measurement of belt coefficient of friction on a test stand.
Technical Paper

Noise Analysis of Automotive Alternators

1999-05-17
1999-01-1712
An extensive experimental study of noise generating mechanisms of two production models of automotive alternators is presented. It was established that aerodynamic noise (generated by cooling fans) is dominating at high speeds (above 3,000 rpm), while electromagnetic noise is the most intensive at low rpm. Two directions of noise reduction are proposed and validated: reduction of noise levels generated by alternators to be achieved by using axial flow fans for cooling instead of presently used bladed discs, and radical reduction of operating speed of alternators by using variable transmission ratio accessory drives.
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