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Standard

Hydraulic Motor Test Procedures

2009-06-12
CURRENT
J746_200906
This test code describes tests for determining characteristics of hydraulic positive displacement motors as used on construction and industrial machinery as referenced in SAE J1116. These characteristics are to be recorded on data sheets similar to the one shown in Figure 1. Two sets of data sheets are to be submitted: one at 49 °C (120 °F) and one at 82 °C (180 °F).
Standard

Multiposition Small Engine Exhaust System Fire Ignition Suppression

2012-10-23
CURRENT
J335_201210
This SAE Recommended Practice establishes equipment and test procedures for determining the performance of spark arrester exhaust systems of multiposition small engines (<19 kW) used in portable applications, including hand-held, hand-guided, and backpack mounted devices. It is not applicable to spark arresters used in vehicles or stationary equipment.
Standard

Self-Propelled Sweepers and Scrubbers Fuel Consumption of Non-Propulsion Auxiliary Engines

2007-11-15
HISTORICAL
J2542_200711
This SAE Standard applies to the fuel consumption of non-propulsion engines used to drive exclusively the sweeping and cleaning functions of multi-engine sweepers and scrubbers as defined in SAE J2130. The purpose of this document is to derive a uniform expression of fuel consumption from a simulated test cycle. The derived expression is based on various work situations encountered during a typical daily eight-hour period of operation. The derived fuel consumption may be used to assess the sizing of fuel tanks.
Standard

Self-Propelled Sweepers and Scrubbers Fuel Consumption of Non-Propulsion Auxiliary Engines

2001-05-14
HISTORICAL
J2542_200105
This SAE Standard applies to the fuel consumption of non-propulsion engines used to drive exclusively the sweeping and cleaning functions of multi-engine sweepers and scrubbers as defined in SAE J2130. The purpose of this document is to derive a uniform expression of fuel consumption from a simulated test cycle. The derived expression is based on various work situations encountered during a typical daily eight-hour period of operation. The derived fuel consumption may be used to assess the sizing of fuel tanks.
Standard

Diesel Fuels

2004-07-28
HISTORICAL
J313_200407
Automotive and railroad diesel fuels, in general, are derived from petroleum refinery products which are commonly referred to as middle distillates. Middle distillates represent products which have a higher boiling range than gasoline and are obtained from fractional distillation of the crude oil or from streams from other refining processes. Finished diesel fuels represent blends of middle distillates. The properties of commercial distillate diesel fuels depend on the refinery practices employed and the nature of the crude oils from which they are derived. Thus, they may differ both with and within the region in which they are manufactured. Such fuels generally boil over a range between 163 and 371 °C (325 to 700 °F). Their makeup can represent various combinations of volatility, ignition quality, viscosity, sulfur level, gravity, and other characteristics. Additives may be used to impart special properties to the finished diesel fuel.
Standard

Diesel Fuels

2017-06-07
CURRENT
J313_201706
Automotive and locomotive diesel fuels, in general, are derived from petroleum refinery products which are commonly referred to as middle distillates. Middle distillates represent products which have a higher boiling range than gasoline and are obtained from fractional distillation of the crude oil or from streams from other refining processes. Finished diesel fuels represent blends of middle distillates and may contain other blending components of substantially non-petroleum origin, such as biodiesel fuel blend stock, and/or middle distillates from non-traditional refining processes, such as gas-to-liquid processes. The properties of commercial distillate diesel fuels depend on the refinery practices employed and the nature of the crude oils from which they are derived. Thus, they may differ both with and within the region in which they are manufactured. Such fuels generally boil, at atmospheric pressure, over a range between 130 °C and 400 °C (approximately 270 °F to 750 °F).
Standard

Cryogenically Fueled Dynamic Power Systems

2011-08-03
CURRENT
AIR999A
In this report, "Cryogenically Fueled Dynamic Power Systems" include all open cycle, chemically fueled, dynamic engine power systems which utilize cryogenic fuels and oxidizers. For nearly all practical present day systems, this category is limited to cryogenic hydrogen or hydrogen-oxygen fueled cycles with potential in future, more advanced systems for replacement of oxygen by fluorine. Excluded from the category are static cryogenic systems (e.g., fuel cells) and chemical dynamic power systems which utilize earth storable propellants.
Standard

CRYOGENICALLY FUELED DYNAMIC POWER SYSTEMS

1968-10-01
HISTORICAL
AIR999
In this report, "Cryogenically Fueled Dynamic Power Systems" include all open cycle, chemically fueled, dynamic engine power systems which utilize cryogenic fuels and oxidizers. For nearly all practical present day systems, this category is limited to cryogenic hydrogen or hydrogen-oxygen fueled cycles with potential in future, more advanced systems for replacement of oxygen by fluorine. Excluded from the category are static cryogenic systems (e.g., fuel cells) and chemical dynamic power systems which utilize earth storable propellants.
Standard

Aircraft Fuel Weight Penalty Due to Air Conditioning

1989-09-01
HISTORICAL
AIR1168/8
The purpose of this section is to provide methods and a set of convenient working charts to estimate penalty values in terms of take-off fuel weight for any given airplane mission. The curves are for a range of specific fuel consumption (SFC) and lift/drag ratio (L/D) compatible with the jet engines and supersonic aircraft currently being developed. A typical example showing use of the charts for an air conditioning system is given. Evaluation of the penalty imposed on aircraft performance characteristics by the installation of an air conditioning system is important for two reasons: 1 It provides a common denominator for comparing systems in the preliminary design stage, thus aiding in the choice of system to be used. 2 It aids in pinpointing portions of existing systems where design improvements can be most readily achieved.
Standard

Aircraft Fuel Weight Penalty Due to Air Conditioning

2011-07-25
CURRENT
AIR1168/8A
The purpose of this section is to provide methods and a set of convenient working charts to estimate penalty values in terms of take-off fuel weight for any given airplane mission. The curves are for a range of specific fuel consumption (SFC) and lift/drag ratio (L/D) compatible with the jet engines and supersonic aircraft currently being developed. A typical example showing use of the charts for an air conditioning system is given. Evaluation of the penalty imposed on aircraft performance characteristics by the installation of an air conditioning system is important for two reasons: 1 It provides a common denominator for comparing systems in the preliminary design stage, thus aiding in the choice of system to be used. 2 It aids in pinpointing portions of existing systems where design improvements can be most readily achieved.
Standard

RECOMMENDED RMS TERMS AND PARAMETERS

1995-12-01
CURRENT
AIR4896
The terms used in most engineering technologies tend to be physical characteristics such as speed, rate of turn, and fuel consumption. While they may require very careful definition and control of the way in which they are measured, the terms themselves are not subject to different interpretations. Reliability, maintainability and supportability (RMS) however, use terms that are mathematically defined. As a result, there are more than 2000 terms defined in just the documents reviewed so far, many of which have multiple interpretations. This proliferation of definitions of the terms leads to problems when one attempts to compare the performance of one system to another. For example, the RMS performance of a transport aircraft from the commercial arena is measured using metrics that are not the same as those for a fighter or attack aircraft from a military service.
Standard

Maintenance Life Cycle Cost Model

2010-03-22
CURRENT
AIR5416
This document describes a life cycle cost model for commercial aircraft composite structure. The term life cycle cost used herein, refers to the airline costs for maintenance, spares support, fuel, repair material and labor associated with composites after introduction into service and throughout its useful life. This document contains the equations that can be programmed into software which is used to estimate the total cost of ownership aircraft, including structure. Modification costs and operating costs are estimated over a specified life (any period up to 30 years). Modification costs include spares holding, training, support equipment, and other system related costs. Annual operating costs include: Schedule interruption, fuel, spares, insurance, and maintenance. Maintenance costs are separated by scheduled maintenance or unscheduled damage, or can by grouped into the typical organizations of line, shop, and hangar maintenance.
Standard

HELICOPTER TURBINE ENGINE WASH

1995-05-01
CURRENT
AIR4416
Engines subject to dust, industrial pollution, saltwater contamination or other chemically laden atmosphere (including pesticides and herbicides) lose performance due to deposits of contaminants on surfaces in the aidgas flow path. Engine wash and engine rinse procedures are utilized to restore turbine engine performance. These procedures are generated by the engine manufacturer and are included in the Engine Maintenance/Service Manuals. For most turbine engines these procedures are similar in concept and practice; however, application details, choice of solvents and many other service features can vary from engine manufacturer to engine manufacturer and may even vary within the range of engine models produced by any manufacturer.
Standard

Environmental Control Systems Life Cycle Cost

2017-02-07
CURRENT
AIR1812B
This report contains background information on life cycle cost elements and key ECS cost factors. Elements of life cycle costs are defined from initial design phases through operational use. Information on how ECS designs affect overall aircraft cost and information on primary factors affecting ECS costs are discussed. Key steps or efforts for comparing ECS designs on the basis of LCC are outlined. Brief descriptions of two computer programs for estimating LCC of total aircraft programs and their use to estimate ECS LCC, are included.
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