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Standard

AUTOMOTIVE METALLURGICAL JOINING

1970-10-01
HISTORICAL
J836_197010
This report is an abbreviated summary of metallurgical joining by welding, brazing, and soldering. It is generally intended to reflect current usage in the automotive industry; however, it does include some of the more recently developed processes. More comprehensive coverage of materials, processing details, and equipment required may be found in the Welding Handbook, Soldering Manual, and other publications of the American Welding Society and the American Society for Testing and Materials. AWS Automotive Welding Committee publications on Recommended Practices are particularly recommended for the design or product engineer. This report is not intended to cover mechanical joining such as rivets or screw fasteners, or chemical joining processes such as adhesive joining.
Standard

WROUGHT NICKEL AND NICKEL-RELATED ALLOYS

1976-07-01
HISTORICAL
J470_197607
This Report presents general information on over 50 alloys in which nickel either predominates or is a significant alloying element. It covers primarily wrought materials, and is not necessarily all inclusive. Values given are in most cases average or nominal, and if more precise values are required the producer(s) should be contacted. This report does not cover the so-called "superalloys," or the iron base stainless steels. Refer to SAE J467, Special Purpose Alloys, and SAE J405, Chemical Compositions of SAE Wrought Stainless Steels, respectively, for data on these alloys.
Standard

Wrought Nickel and Nickel-Related Alloys

2018-02-15
CURRENT
J470_201802
This Report presents general information on over 50 alloys in which nickel either predominates or is a significant alloying element. It covers primarily wrought materials, and is not necessarily all inclusive. Values given are in most cases average or nominal, and if more precise values are required the producer(s) should be contacted. This report does not cover the so-called "superalloys," or the iron base stainless steels. Refer to SAE J467, Special Purpose Alloys, and SAE J405, Chemical Compositions of SAE Wrought Stainless Steels, respectively, for data on these alloys.
Standard

Cleanliness Rating of Steels by the Magnetic Particle Method

2018-01-09
CURRENT
J421_201801
This SAE Recommended Practice provides a rating procedure for the cleanliness rating of steels by the magnetic particle method. The procedure is based on counting the number of indications (frequency) and employs a weighted value to obtain a severity factor. The method outlined is similar to that described in SAE Aerospace Material Specification AMS 2301.
Standard

CLEANLINESS RATING OF STEELS BY THE MAGNETIC PARTICLE METHOD

1993-05-01
HISTORICAL
J421_199305
This SAE Recommended Practice provides a rating procedure for the cleanliness rating of steels by the magnetic particle method. The procedure is based on counting the number of indications (frequency) and employs a weighted value to obtain a severity factor. The method outlined is similar to that described in SAE Aerospace Material Specification AMS 2301.
Standard

PENETRATING RADIATION INSPECTION

1991-03-01
HISTORICAL
J427_199103
The purpose of this SAE Information Report is to provide basic information on penetrating radiation, as applied in the field of nondestructive testing, and to supply the user with sufficient information so that he may decide whether penetrating radiation methods apply to his particular inspection need. Detailed information references are listed in Section 2.
Standard

Penetrating Radiation Inspection

2018-01-09
CURRENT
J427_201801
The purpose of this SAE Information Report is to provide basic information on penetrating radiation, as applied in the field of nondestructive testing, and to supply the user with sufficient information so that he may decide whether penetrating radiation methods apply to his particular inspection need. Detailed information references are listed in Section 2.
Standard

High Temperature Materials for Exhaust Manifolds

1999-08-01
HISTORICAL
J2515_199908
A subcommittee within SAE ISTC Division 35 has written this report to provide automotive engineers and designers a basic understanding of the design considerations and high temperature material availability for exhaust manifold use. It is hoped that it will constitute a concise reference of the important characteristics of selected cast and wrought ferrous materials available for this application, as well as methods employed for manufacturing. The different types of manifolds used in current engine designs are discussed, along with their range of applicability. Finally, a general description of mechanical, chemical, and thermophysical properties of commonly-used alloys is provided, along with discussions on the importance of such properties.
Standard

High Temperature Materials for Exhaust Manifolds

2017-12-20
CURRENT
J2515_201712
A subcommittee within SAE ISTC Division 35 has written this report to provide automotive engineers and designers a basic understanding of the design considerations and high temperature material availability for exhaust manifold use. It is hoped that it will constitute a concise reference of the important characteristics of selected cast and wrought ferrous materials available for this application, as well as methods employed for manufacturing. The different types of manifolds used in current engine designs are discussed, along with their range of applicability. Finally, a general description of mechanical, chemical, and thermophysical properties of commonly-used alloys is provided, along with discussions on the importance of such properties.
Standard

Abrasive Wear

2018-01-09
CURRENT
J965_201801
An enormous economic loss, as well as a waste of natural resources, is incurred world-wide as a result of wear of components and tools. Any effort expended in an attempt to reduce this loss is indeed worthwhile. The purpose of this SAE Information Report is to present the current state of knowledge of abrasive wear. This report, therefore, covers wear, or the undesired removal of metal by mechanical action, caused by abrasive particles in contact with the surface. It does not concern metal-to-metal wear or wear in the presence of an abrasive free lubricant. Abrasive wear occurs when hard particles, such as rocks, sand, or fragments of certain hard metals, slide or roll under pressure across a surface. This action tends to cut grooves across the metal surface, much like a cutting tool. Abrasive wear is of considerable importance in any part moving in relation to an abrasive.
Standard

ABRASIVE WEAR

1966-08-01
HISTORICAL
J965_196608
An enormous economic loss, as well as a waste of natural resources, is incurred world-wide as a result of wear of components and tools. Any effort expended in an attempt to reduce this loss is indeed worthwhile. The purpose of this SAE Information Report is to present the current state of knowledge of abrasive wear. This report, therefore, covers wear, or the undesired removal of metal by mechanical action, caused by abrasive particles in contact with the surface. It does not concern metal-to-metal wear or wear in the presence of an abrasive free lubricant. Abrasive wear occurs when hard particles, such as rocks, sand, or fragments of certain hard metals, slide or roll under pressure across a surface. This action tends to cut grooves across the metal surface, much like a cutting tool. Abrasive wear is of considerable importance in any part moving in relation to an abrasive.
Standard

Valve Seat Insert Information Report

2017-12-20
CURRENT
J1692_201712
This SAE Information Report provides engineers and designers with: a Types of valve seat inserts and their nomenclature b Valve seat insert alloy designations and their chemistries c Valve seat insert alloy metallurgy d Typical mechanical and physical properties of insert alloys e Recommended interference fits f Installation procedures g Application considerations
Standard

VALVE SEAT INSERT INFORMATION REPORT

1993-08-01
HISTORICAL
J1692_199308
This SAE Information Report provides engineers and designers with: a Types of valve seat inserts and their nomenclature b Valve seat insert alloy designations and their chemistries c Valve seat insert alloy metallurgy d Typical mechanical and physical properties of insert alloys e Recommended interference fits f Installation procedures g Application considerations
Standard

Valve Guide Information Report

2017-12-20
CURRENT
J1682_201712
This SAE Information Report provides: a Types of valve guides and their nomenclature b Valve guide alloy designations and their chemistries c Valve guide alloy metallurgy d Typical mechanical and physical properties of guide alloys e Typical dimensional tolerances of valve guides and their counterbores f Recommended interference fits g Installation procedures h Application considerations
Standard

VALVE GUIDE INFORMATION REPORT

1993-09-10
HISTORICAL
J1682_199309
This SAE Information Report provides: a Types of valve guides and their nomenclature b Valve guide alloy designations and their chemistries c Valve guide alloy metallurgy d Typical mechanical and physical properties of guide alloys e Typical dimensional tolerances of valve guides and their counterbores f Recommended interference fits g Installation procedures h Application considerations
Standard

Zinc Die Casting Alloys

2017-12-20
CURRENT
J469_201712
Because of the drastic chilling involved in die casting and the fact that the solid solubilities of both aluminum and copper in zinc change with temperature, these alloys are subject to some aging changes, one of which is a dimensional change. Both of the alloys undergo a slight shrinkage after casting, which at room temperature is about two-thirds complete in five weeks. It is possible to accelerate this shrinkage by a stabilizing anneal, after which no further changes occur. The recommended stabilizing anneal is 3 to 6 h at 100 °C (212 °F), or 5 to 10 h at 85 °C (185 °F), or 10 to 20 h at 70 °C (158 °F). The time in each case is measured from the time at which the castings reach the annealing temperature. The parts may be air cooled after annealing. Such a treatment will cause a shrinkage (0.0004 in per in) of about two-thirds of the total, and the remaining shrinkage will occur at room temperature during the subsequent few weeks.
Standard

ZINC DIE CASTING ALLOYS

1989-01-01
HISTORICAL
J469_198901
Because of the drastic chilling involved in die casting and the fact that the solid solubilities of both aluminum and copper in zinc change with temperature, these alloys are subject to some aging changes, one of which is a dimensional change. Both of the alloys undergo a slight shrinkage after casting, which at room temperature is about two-thirds complete in five weeks. It is possible to accelerate this shrinkage by a stabilizing anneal, after which no further changes occur. The recommended stabilizing anneal is 3 to 6 h at 100 °C (212 °F), or 5 to 10 h at 85 °C (185 °F), or 10 to 20 h at 70 °C (158 °F). The time in each case is measured from the time at which the castings reach the annealing temperature. The parts may be air cooled after annealing. Such a treatment will cause a shrinkage (0.0004 in per in) of about two-thirds of the total, and the remaining shrinkage will occur at room temperature during the subsequent few weeks.
Standard

Bearing and Bushing Alloys

2018-01-10
CURRENT
J459_201801
The bearing performance of steel backed half bearings, bushings, and washers is dependent on the properties and thickness of the lining alloy, the strength and dimensional stability of the steel backing (usually SAE 1010) and the strength of the bond between the lining alloy and the backing. This SAE Information Report is primarily concerned with the properties of the lining alloys used in automotive applications, in particular, the crankshaft bearings of the internal combustion engine.
Standard

BEARING AND BUSHING ALLOYS

1991-10-01
HISTORICAL
J459_199110
The bearing performance of steel backed half bearings, bushings, and washers is dependent on the properties and thickness of the lining alloy, the strength and dimensional stability of the steel backing (usually SAE 1010) and the strength of the bond between the lining alloy and the backing. This SAE Information Report is primarily concerned with the properties of the lining alloys used in automotive applications, in particular, the crankshaft bearings of the internal combustion engine.
Standard

Automotive Ductile Iron Castings for High Temperature Applications

2018-01-09
CURRENT
J2582_201801
This SAE Standard covers the hardness, chemical analysis and microstructural requirements for ductile iron castings intended for high temperature service in automotive and allied industries. Commonly known as SiMo ductile iron, typical applications are in piston-engine exhaust manifolds and turbocharger parts. Castings may be specified in the as-cast or heat treated condition. For design purposes, the Appendix provides general information on the application of high temperature ductile iron castings, their processing conditions, chemical composition, mechanical properties and microstructure.
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