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AIRCRAFT ELECTRICAL HEATING SYSTEMS

1965-01-10
HISTORICAL
AIR860
It is intended that the scope of this information report be limited to electrical heating of passenger, crew, and cargo compartments only.
Standard

Aircraft Electrical Heating Systems

2000-06-01
HISTORICAL
AIR860A
It is intended that the scope of this information report be limited to electrical heating of passenger, crew, and cargo compartments only. No attempt has been made to develop the complete electrical circuitry associated with the electrical heating components; however, the electrical circuitry required for heating component operation, safety, and monitoring will be included as available. Specific design information is given for various modern aircraft utilizing electrical heating. Each aircraft discussed will be identified by alphabetical letter designation and included in the appropriate appendix.
Standard

Aircraft Electrical Heating Systems

2011-10-17
CURRENT
AIR860B
It is intended that the scope of this information report be limited to electrical heating of passenger, crew, and cargo compartments only. No attempt has been made to develop the complete electrical circuitry associated with the electrical heating components; however, the electrical circuitry required for heating component operation, safety, and monitoring will be included as available. Specific design information is given for various modern aircraft utilizing electrical heating. Each aircraft discussed will be identified by alphabetical letter designation and included in the appropriate appendix.
Standard

AIR CONDITIONING OF AIRCRAFT CARGO

1978-07-01
HISTORICAL
AIR806A
The report presents air conditioning data for aircraft cargo which is affected by temperature, humidity, ventilation rate and atmospheric pressure. The major emphasis is on conditioning of perishable products and warm-blooded animals. The report also covers topics peculiar to cargo aircraft or which are related to the handling of cargo.
Standard

Air Conditioning of Aircraft Cargo

1997-10-01
CURRENT
AIR806B
The report presents air conditioning data for aircraft cargo which is affected by temperature, humidity, ventilation rate and atmospheric pressure. The major emphasis is on conditioning of perishable products and warm-blooded animals. The report also covers topics peculiar to cargo aircraft or which are related to the handling of cargo.
Standard

OZONE PROBLEMS IN HIGH ALTITUDE AIRCRAFT

1996-07-01
HISTORICAL
AIR910A
The purpose of this report is to provide information on ozone and its control in high altitude aircraft environmental systems. Sources of this information are listed in the selected bibliography appearing at the end of this report, to which references are made throughout.
Standard

Aircraft Humidification

2016-10-21
WIP
AIR1609B
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) covers the design parameters for various methods of humidification applicable to aircraft, the physiological aspects of low humidities, the possible benefits of controlling cabin humidity, the penalties associated with humidification, and the problems which must be solved for practical aircraft humidification systems. The design information is applicable to commercial and military aircraft. The physiological aspects cover all aircraft environmental control applications.
Standard

COOLING OF MODERN AIRBORNE ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT

1976-05-01
HISTORICAL
AIR1277
This document contains information on the cooling of modern airborne electronics, emphasizing the use of a heat exchange surface which separates coolant and component. It supplements the information contained in AIR 64 for the draw through method and in AIR 728 for high Mach Number aircraft. Report contents include basic methods, characteristics of coolants, application inside and outside of the "black box" use of thermostatic controls to improve reliability and system design. Characteristics of typical cooling components are treated sufficiently to permit selection and to estimate size and weight. While emphasis is placed herein on equipment cooling, section 9 dealing with thermal control of the environment, reminds the reader that some equipment will require heating for start up from a cold condition or as a means to control temperature within narrow limits (e.g. in a crystal oven). Property data and constants are also tabulated.
Standard

Aircraft Compartment Automatic Temperature Control Systems

1949-02-01
HISTORICAL
ARP89A
The recommendations of this SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) for aircraft compartment automatic temperature control systems are primarily intended to be applicable to occupied or unoccupied compartments of civil and military aircraft.
Standard

Aircraft Compartment Automatic Temperature Control Systems

1943-01-01
HISTORICAL
ARP89
The recommendations of this SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) for aircraft compartment automatic temperature control systems are primarily intended to be applicable to occupied or unoccupied compartments of civil and miliary aircraft.
Standard

Air Cycle Air Conditioning Systems for Military Air Vehicles

2018-09-17
WIP
AS4073B
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) defines the requirements for air cycle air conditioning systems used on military air vehicles for cooling, heating, ventilation, and moisture and contamination control. General recommendations for an air conditioning system, which may include an air cycle system as a cooling source, are included in MIL-E-18927E (AS) and JSSG-2009. Air cycle air conditioning systems include those components which condition high temperature and high pressure air for delivery to occupied and equipment compartments and to electrical and electronic equipment. This document is applicable to open and closed loop air cycle systems. Definitions are contained in Section 5 of this document.
Standard

Aircraft Cabin Pressurization Criteria

2017-04-10
WIP
ARP1270C
This ARP covers the basic criteria for the design of cabin pressure control systems (CPCS) for general aviation, commercial and military pressurized aircraft.
Standard

ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL SYSTEMS TERMINOLOGY

1997-10-01
HISTORICAL
ARP147D
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) provides the definition of terms commonly used in aircraft environmental control system (ECS) design and analysis. Many of the terms may be used as guidelines for establishing standard ECS nomenclature. Some general thermodynamic terms are included that are frequently used in ECS analysis, but this document is not meant to be an inclusive list of such terms.
Standard

Environmental Control Systems Terminology

2001-12-14
CURRENT
ARP147E
This ARP provides the definition of terms commonly used in aircraft environmental control system (ECS) design and analysis. Many of the terms may be used as guidelines for establishing standard ECS nomenclature. Some general thermodynamic terms are included that are frequently used in ECS analysis, but this document is not meant to be an inclusive list of such terms.
Standard

AIR CONDITIONING, HELICOPTER, GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR

1970-10-26
HISTORICAL
ARP292B
These recommendations are written to cover the general requirements of helicopter air conditioning and are sub-divided as follows: (1) Air Conditioning System - Dealing with the general design aspects. (2) Air Conditioning Equipment - Design requirements for satisfactory system function and performance. (3) Air Conditioning System Design Requirements -General information for use of those concerned in meeting requirements contained herein.
Standard

Thermodynamics of Incompressible and Compressible Fluid Flow

2017-12-27
WIP
AIR1168/1A
The fluid flow treated in this section is isothermal, subsonic, and incompressible. The effects of heat addition, work on the fluid, variation in sonic velocity, and changes in elevation are neglected. An incompressible fluid is one in which a change in pressure causes no resulting change in fluid density. The assumption that liquids are incompressible introduces no appreciable error in calculations, but the assumption that a gas is incompressible introduces an error of a magnitude that is dependent on the fluid velocity and on the loss coefficient of the particular duct section or price of equipment. Fit 1A-1 shows the error in pressure drop resulting from assuming that air is incompressible. With reasonably small loss coefficients and the accuracy that is usually required in most calculations, compressible fluids may be treated as incompressible for velocities less than Mach 0.2.
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