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Standard

OZONE PROBLEMS IN HIGH ALTITUDE AIRCRAFT

1996-07-01
HISTORICAL
AIR910A
The purpose of this report is to provide information on ozone and its control in high altitude aircraft environmental systems. Sources of this information are listed in the selected bibliography appearing at the end of this report, to which references are made throughout.
Standard

Characteristics of Equipment Components, Equipment Cooling System Design, and Temperature Control System Design

1993-04-01
HISTORICAL
AIR1168/6
This section relates the engineering fundamentals and thermophysical property material of the previous sections to the airborne equipment for which thermodynamic considerations apply. For each generic classification of equipment, information is presented for the types of equipment included in these categories, and the thermodynamic design considerations with respect to performance, sizing, and selection of this equipment.
Standard

Characteristics of Equipment Components, Equipment Cooling System Design, and Temperature Control System Design

2011-07-25
CURRENT
AIR1168/6A
This section relates the engineering fundamentals and thermophysical property material of the previous sections to the airborne equipment for which thermodynamic considerations apply. For each generic classification of equipment, information is presented for the types of equipment included in these categories, and the thermodynamic design considerations with respect to performance, sizing, and selection of this equipment.
Standard

Aerospace Pressurization System Design

1991-03-01
HISTORICAL
AIR1168/7
The pressurization system design considerations presented in this AIR deal with human physiological requirements, characteristics of pressurization air sources, methods of controlling cabin pressure, cabin leakage control, leakage calculation methods, and methods of emergency cabin pressure release.
Standard

Aerospace Pressurization System Design

2011-07-25
CURRENT
AIR1168/7A
The pressurization system design considerations presented in this AIR deal with human physiological requirements, characteristics of pressurization air sources, methods of controlling cabin pressure, cabin leakage control, leakage calculation methods, and methods of emergency cabin pressure release.
Standard

Spacecraft Equipment Environmental Control

1999-11-01
HISTORICAL
AIR1168/13
This part of the manual presents methods for arriving at a solution to the problem of spacecraft inflight equipment environmental control. The temperature aspect of this problem may be defined as the maintenance of a proper balance and integration of the following thermal loads: equipment-generated, personnel-generated, and transmission through external boundary. Achievement of such a thermal energy balance involves the investigation of three specific areas: 1 Establishment of design requirements. 2 Evaluation of properties of materials. 3 Development of analytical approach. The solution to the problem of vehicle and/or equipment pressurization, which is the second half of major environmental control functions, is also treated in this section. Pressurization in this case may be defined as the task associated with the storage and control of a pressurizing fluid, leakage control, and repressurization.
Standard

Spacecraft Equipment Environmental Control

2011-07-25
CURRENT
AIR1168/13A
This part of the manual presents methods for arriving at a solution to the problem of spacecraft inflight equipment environmental control. The temperature aspect of this problem may be defined as the maintenance of a proper balance and integration of the following thermal loads: equipment-generated, personnel-generated, and transmission through external boundary. Achievement of such a thermal energy balance involves the investigation of three specific areas: 1 Establishment of design requirements. 2 Evaluation of properties of materials. 3 Development of analytical approach. The solution to the problem of vehicle and/or equipment pressurization, which is the second half of major environmental control functions, is also treated in this section. Pressurization in this case may be defined as the task associated with the storage and control of a pressurizing fluid, leakage control, and repressurization.
Standard

Aircraft Compartment Automatic Temperature Control Systems

2018-09-24
WIP
ARP89E
The recommendations of this SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) for aircraft compartment automatic temperature control systems are primarily intended to be applicable to occupied or unoccupied compartments of civil and military aircraft.
Standard

Aircraft Compartment Automatic Temperature Control Systems

1995-12-01
CURRENT
ARP89D
The recommendations of this SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) for aircraft compartment automatic temperature control systems are primarily intended to be applicable to occupied or unoccupied compartments of civil and military aircraft.
Standard

ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS SCHEMATIC SYMBOLS

1963-05-01
HISTORICAL
ARP780
These recommendations provide a list of graphical symbols for use on environmental systems schematic diagrams. The symbols listed are those most commonly employed on engineering drawings.
Standard

Environmental Control Systems for Helicopters

1998-01-01
CURRENT
ARP292C
This ARP discusses design philosophy, system and equipment requirements, environmental conditions, and design considerations for helicopter environmental control systems (ECS). The helicopter ECS comprises that arrangement of equipment, controls, and indicators which supply and distribute dehumidified conditioned air for ventilation, cooling and heating of the occupied compartments, and cooling of the avionics. The principal features of the system are: a A controlled fresh air supply b A means for cooling (air or vapor cycle units and heat exchangers) c A means for removing excess moisture from the air supply d A means for heating e A temperature control system f A conditioned air distribution system The ARP is applicable to both civil and military helicopters where an ECS is specified; however, certain requirements peculiar to military applications, such as nuclear, biological and chemical (NBC) protection, are not covered.
Standard

Engine Bleed Air Systems for Aircraft

1987-02-01
HISTORICAL
ARP1796
This ARP discusses design philosophy, system and equipment requirements, installation environment and design considerations for systems within the ATA 100 specification, Chapter 36, Pneumatic (reference 1). This ATA system/chapter covers equipment used to deliver compressed air from a power source to connecting points for other systems such as air conditioning, pressurization, anti-icing, cross-engine starting, air turbine motors, air driven hydraulic pumps, and other pneumatic demands. The engine bleed air system includes components for preconditioning the compressed air (temperature, pressure or flow regulation), ducting to distribute high or low pressure air to the using systems, and sensors/instruments to indicate temperature and pressure levels within the system. The engine bleed air system interfaces with the following ATA 100 systems: The interface with these systems/chapters is at the inlet of the shutoff/control valve of each associated system.
Standard

LIQUID COOLING SYSTEMS

1985-09-01
HISTORICAL
AIR1811
This publication is applicable to liquid cooling systems of the closed loop type and the expendable coolant type in which the primary function is transporting of heat from its source to a heat sink. Most liquid cooling system applications are oriented toward the cooling of electronics. Liquid cooling techniques, heat sinks, design features, selection of coolants, corrosion control, and servicing requirements for these systems are presented. Information on vapor compression refrigeration systems, which are a type of cooling system, is found in Reference 1.
Standard

Heat Sinks for Airborne Vehicles

2015-11-19
CURRENT
AIR1957A
This document summarizes types of heat sinks and considerations in relation to the general requirements of aircraft heat sources, and it provides information to achieve efficient utilization and management of these heat sinks. In this document, a heat sink is defined as a body or substance used for removal of the heat generated by thermodynamic processes. This document provides general data about airborne heat sources, heat sinks, and modes of heat transfer. The document also discusses approaches to control the use of heat sinks and techniques for analysis and verification of heat sink management. The heat sinks are for aircraft operating at subsonic and supersonic speeds.
Standard

Liquid Cooling Systems

1997-10-01
CURRENT
AIR1811A
This publication is applicable to liquid cooling systems of the closed loop type and the expendable coolant type in which the primary function is transporting of heat from its source to a heat sink. Most liquid cooling system applications are oriented toward the cooling of electronics. Liquid cooling techniques, heat sinks, design features, selection of coolants, corrosion control, and servicing requirements for these systems are presented. Information on vapor compression refrigeration systems, which are a type of cooling system, is found in Reference 1.
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