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Introduction to Commercial and Off-Road Vehicle Cooling Airflow Systems

Vehicle functional requirements, emission regulations, and thermal limits all have a direct impact on the design of a powertrain cooling airflow system. Given the expected increase in emission-related heat rejection, suppliers and vehicle manufacturers must work together as partners in the design, selection, and packaging of cooling system components. An understanding and appreciation of airflow integration issues and vehicle-level trade-offs that effect system performance are important to the team effort. The severe duty cycles, minimal ram air, and sometimes unconventional package layouts present unique challenges.
Video

Neural Network-based Optimal Control for Advanced Vehicular Thermal Management Systems

2011-12-05
Advanced vehicular thermal management system can improve engine performance, minimize fuel consumption, and reduce emissions by harmoniously operating computer-controlled servomotor components. In this paper, a neural network-based optimal control strategy is proposed to regulate the engine temperature through the advanced cooling system. Presenter Asma Al Tamimi, Hashemite University
Video

Cooling Airflow System Modeling in CFD Using Assumption of Stationary Flow

2011-11-29
Today CFD is an important tool for engineers in the automotive industry who model and simulate fluid flow. For the complex field of Underhood Thermal Management, CFD has become a very important tool to engineer the cooling airflow process in the engine bay of vehicles. Presenter Peter Gullberg, Chalmers University of Technology
Video

High Load HCCI Operation Using Different Valving Strategies in a Naturally-Aspirated Gasoline HCCI Engine

2012-02-16
This session focuses on kinetically controlled combustion. Experimental and simulation studies pertaining to various means of controlling combustion are welcome. Examples are research studies dealing with temperature and composition distribution inside the cylinder and their impact on heat release process. Studies clarifying the role of fuel physical and chemical properties in autoignition are also welcome. Presenter Hanho Yun, General Motors Company
Video

High Speed Machining of CFRP Parts

2012-03-16
High Speed Machining of CFRP Parts Investigation of the influence of new geometries, cutting datas and coolant capabilities on the surface finish of CFRP parts. State of the art: Different CFRP grades and machining conditions make geometry adjustments to the tool necessary. Mechanical failures through machining operations can be avoided in most of the cases. New unidirectional CFRP grades and dry machining processes again lead to machining problems. This study investigates new geometries to avoid heat damage with dry maching and air coolant in case of unidirectional CFRP. With help of a thermo camera and the surface investigation with a scanning electron microscope, heat damage can be analysed and therefore new geometries can be developed and tested. Target is to develop a new multi purpose CFRP geometry to meet the requirements of the future. The reduction of different geometries used leads to major cost savings. Presenter Ingo von Puttkamer, Guhring oHG
Book

Principles of Engine Cooling Systems, Components and Maintenance

1990-10-01
Completely revised as a result of the significant progress made in cooling system design and maintenance practices and procedures, HS-40 provides current, comprehensive information on the description, function, and maintenance of engine liquid-cooling systems used in light and heavy-duty vehicles. Information-packed chapters discuss the interrelation between the cooling system and other engine systems, cooling system components, general preventive maintenance, and troubleshooting.
Book

Design of Racing and High Performance Engines

1995-02-01
This book presents, in a clear and easy-to-understand manner, the basic principles involved in the design of high performance engines. Editor Joseph Harralson first compiled this collection of papers for an internal combustion engine design course he teaches at the California State University of Sacramento. Topics covered include: engine friction and output; design of high performance cylinder heads; multi-cylinder motorcycle racing engines; valve timing and how it effects performance; computer modeling of valve spring and valve train dynamics; correlation between valve size and engine operating speed; how flow bench testing is used to improve engine performance; and lean combustion. In addition, two papers of historical interest are included, detailing the design and development of the Ford D.O.H.C. competition engine and the coventry climax racing engine.
Technical Paper

The Influence of Fuel Characteristics on Engine Acceleration

1928-01-01
280043
SELECTION of a method and development of apparatus enabling precise and detailed measurement of engine acceleration is discussed in the first portion of this paper, the latter portion of which is concerned with the experimental results thereby obtained. Previous work on the influence of engine conditions on acceleration is generally substantiated. A method is described for approximately deriving the effective air-fuel ratio delivered to the cylinders during acceleration, practical applications are suggested, and limitations are discussed. The effect of fuel volatility on engine acceleration was studied, using six fuels: Aviation gasoline; commercial gasoline; a blend composed of equal parts of the two; and three especially prepared fuels, all of which have equal 20 and 90-per cent points but differ widely at the 50-per cent point. It is shown that the relative values of these fuels for acceleration depend upon the amount of vaporization in the manifold.
Technical Paper

Automobile Practice in Europe

1928-01-01
280037
EUROPEAN trends in some of the major features of engine, chassis and body design and in several items of equipment are reviewed in this paper; which is based on the observation and analysis of the British engineer editor who is its author, and of the staff of The Motor, of London, during the last five years. Although American automotive engineers who follow European practice are acquainted with most of the designs here shown and described briefly, this paper is of interest and value as showing the present principal lines along which development is taking place abroad. Popular chassis types are divided into three classes: (a) the “baby” four-cylinder car of 7 to 9 hp., Royal Automobile Club rating; (b) the “family-type” four-cylinder car of 12 to 14-hp. rating; and (c) the light six-cylinder car of 15 to 20-hp. rating. Typical acceleration curves for well-known cars in each of these classes are given, as well as cylinder dimensions, volumetric capacity, car weight and price.
Technical Paper

Progress in Honing-Machines and the Honing Process

1928-01-01
280060
CYLINDER finishing by rough and finish-boring with wide tools, which was thought good enough during the first dozen years of the automobile-production period, was supplanted by reaming and grinding. Later, cast-iron and copper laps were used, but all these methods were slow and did not produce the fine finish for which a demand developed. Experiments were begun about 1920 with the process known as honing. Five years later the company with which the author is connected converted one of its drilling-machines into a single-spindle honing-machine. Other companies made similar conversions. The first honing-head was introduced in 1923. Not until three years ago, however, did honing begin to be regarded as a real production-method possibility. Since then, very rapid progress has been made and numerous improved machines, honing-heads and honing-stones have been produced.
Technical Paper

The Packard X 24-Cylinder 1500-Hp. Water-Cooled Aircraft Engine

1928-01-01
280064
AFTER outlining the history of development of the Packard X engine, the author states the legitimate position in aviation deserved by the water-cooled aviation-engine of this type and predicts large increases in the size, speed and carrying capacity of airplanes within the near future. Passing then to a discussion of the important features of the X-type engine, various illustrations of its parts are commented upon. The cylinders are built-up from steel forgings, with all welds arranged so as to be subjected to no excessive alternating stresses. The novel features of this cylinder design lie in the fact that the valve seats are entirely surrounded by water and that water space is provided above the combustion-chamber and below the top plate of the cylinder. The cylinder-head is extremely rigid, resisting deflection and assuring the maximum integrity of valve seats. The valve ports are machined integrally with the cylinder-head and are not welded thereto as in the Liberty engine.
Technical Paper

Diesel Engines for Aircraft

1929-01-01
290057
ALTHOUGH the author and his associates have designed, built and tested a Diesel airplane-engine, a description of the mechanical details is omitted because the engine is still in the experimental stage. The general subject of Diesel engines for aircraft is therefore presented in its broader aspects. Typical indicator-diagrams of a gasoline engine and of a Deisel engine are compared as a means of ascertaining whether the pessimistic attitude that the Diesel engine cannot be made light enough for aircraft-propulsion purposes is justified. These considerations lead to the statement that, since a practicable Diesel aircraft-engine must run at speeds five or six times as fast as the stationary or marine-type of Diesel powerplants, whereas the ignition time-lag is substantially the same, it can be seen that the high-speed engine demands a different type of combustion than does the low-speed Diesel.
Technical Paper

Effect of a Centrifugal Supercharger on Fuel Vaporization

1929-01-01
290077
SUPPLEMENTING the results of an investigation at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology on supercharging a single-cylinder automobile engine which were presented at the 1928 Annual Meeting, this paper reports a study that was made to determine whether the mechanical action of a high-speed centrifugal supercharger improves engine performance by increasing the degree of atomization and vaporization of the fuel in the inlet manifold. While changes in the degree of fuel atomization and vaporization might be measured directly by sampling the gases as they pass to each cylinder, an indirect evaluation of these changes by measuring their effect on engine performance was considered more practicable. Tests were made on a six-cylinder automobile engine connected to an electric cradle-dynamometer.
Technical Paper

Front-Wheel Drives

1930-01-01
300001
ENGINEERING considerations leading to the former almost universal practice of steering with the front wheels and driving and braking with the rear wheels are reviewed, and the desire for bodies lower than can be made with conventional design is given as the main reason for the present interest in front drives. For early history, European development, racing practice and the closely related subject of four-wheel drives, the reader is referred to a previous paper by Herbert Chase.2 One major advantage to be secured with front-drive design is lower unsprung weight, which should promote easy riding and road-holding ability and reduce tire wear. An inherent disadvantage is that driving-torque reaction and hill climbing shift some weight from the front axle to the rear axle, thus slightly reducing the tractive effort possible; but this shift is not considered important, since the control of weight distribution is in the hands of the designer.
Technical Paper

Mixture Distribution

1930-01-01
300007
HOPING that discussion and dissemination of information on the fundamentals of distribution routine will continue, the author reiterates known facts, which include (a) the method of charting distribution progress, (b) a suggestion for locating the error in distribution and (c) a series of thoughts on construction. The paper is divided into two parts, the first being a study of distribution routine and the other a discussion of a few of the problems that are met every day in the search for perfect distribution. Complete satisfactory distribution and the quantitative measurement of its quality are the two major problems of distribution. The interrelation of these problems is mentioned and the complexity of the subject of distribution is emphasized by listing nine detailed factors, the point being made that if the information that engineers have on these items could be collected and codified considerable progress would be made.
Technical Paper

Cold Carburetion

1930-01-01
300006
EXPERIMENTS made and methods employed to obtain satisfactory engine operation without the addition of heat to the fuel-air mixture are described, as it is known that the power output of an engine is greater as the temperature of the mixture is lower and that higher compression can be used with lower mixture-temperature. The work was initiated with a single-cylinder engine in which kerosene was used as a fuel to ascertain the results that could be obtained without vaporizing the fuel in the manifold, the liquid being added to the air in the valve-chamber as the air entered the combustion-chamber. As satisfactory results followed, the next step was to devise and apply a mechanism based on the same principle to a multi-cylinder engine. The first and succeeding carbureter-manifold combinations used are illustrated and described.
Technical Paper

Aluminum Cylinder Heads Urged as Way to Better Design

1933-01-01
330007
MEASURED gains in performance obtained by using aluminum instead of iron for cylinder head material come from the increased compression ratios possible, Mr. Kishline says, and recommends higher ratios “as a logical means for the engineer to use in creating better transportation.” He gives actual figures taken from observed dynamometer performance showing comparable results on similar engines with aluminum and iron cylinder heads. Desirable features of aluminum heads are presented, after which are discussed design improvements necessary if such heads are to be used successfully. Differences in combustion phenomena resulting from use of iron and aluminum heads also are outlined.
Technical Paper

Commercial Application of Diesel Engines in Heavy-Duty Motorcoaches and Trucks

1932-01-01
320070
COMPARATIVE tests were made, both on the block and in the same motorcoach chassis, of a 525-cu.-in. gasoline and a 495-cu.-in. Diesel engine. The block tests are reported fully in charts, including curves for torque and power against piston displacement and engine weight. Corrected curves are given on the basis of equal piston displacement and for the Diesel engine throttled enough so that it would not smoke. Road tests included fuel consumption, acceleration, hill climbing and top speed, which are also recorded in charts. Other sections of the paper deal with costs of manufacture and maintenance and present and prospective conditions as to supply and cost of Diesel fuel. Stress is laid on the facts that automotive Diesel engines require a much higher grade of fuel than do the larger and slower Diesel units and that more gasoline than fuel oil can be obtained from a given amount of crude.
Technical Paper

Bending Moments in the Master Rod of a Radial Aircraft Engine

1932-01-01
320069
HEREIN are presented the results of an investigation of the bending moments in the master rod of a radial aircraft engine by a graphical method, and a simple formula derived therefrom for approximating this moment in similar engines. The bending stress in the master rod comes from turning moments about the crankpin axis caused by the action of the articulated rods due to gas-pressure and inertia forces and also by the inertia forces in the master rod itself. Charts are presented that show the magnitude and fluctuation of these turning moments. Accurate computation of these moments involves much tedious work. A method of approximating them with sufficient accuracy for engineering purposes is given for the case of a nine-cylinder radial aircraft engine. The method is applicable also to non-radial engines and to radial engines having other than nine cylinders, but in these cases investigation of the turning moments due to the gas loads in certain cylinders seems advisable.
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