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Standard

Aircraft Cabin Pressurization Control Criteria

2000-04-01
HISTORICAL
ARP1270A
These recommendations cover the basic criteria for the design of aircraft cabin pressurization control systems as follows: (1) To ensure aircraft safety. (2) Physiology and limits which govern maximum permissible pressure time relations as related to aircraft passenger comfort. (3) General pressurization control system performance requirements designed to satisfy (2). (4) Technical considerations relevant to satisfying (3).
Standard

AIRCRAFT CABIN PRESSURIZATION CONTROL CRITERIA

1976-01-15
HISTORICAL
ARP1270
These recommendations cover the basic criteria for the design of aircraft cabin pressurization control systems as follows: (1) To ensure aircraft safety. (2) Physiology and limits which govern maximum permissible pressure time relations as related to aircraft passenger comfort. (3) General pressurization control system performance requirements designed to satisfy (2). (4) Technical considerations relevant to satisfying (3).
Standard

Thermodynamics of Incompressible and Compressible Fluid Flow

1989-03-01
CURRENT
AIR1168/1
The fluid flow treated in this section is isothermal, subsonic, and incompressible. The effects of heat addition, work on the fluid, variation in sonic velocity, and changes in elevation are neglected. An incompressible fluid is one in which a change in pressure causes no resulting change in fluid density. The assumption that liquids are incompressible introduces no appreciable error in calculations, but the assumption that a gas is incompressible introduces an error of a magnitude that is dependent on the fluid velocity and on the loss coefficient of the particular duct section or piece of equipment. Fig. 1A-1 shows the error in pressure drop resulting from assuming that air is incompressible. With reasonably small loss coefficients and the accuracy that is usually required in most calculations, compressible fluids may be treated as incompressible for velocities less than Mach 0.2.
Standard

Testing of Airplane Installed Environmental Control Systems (ECS)

1999-03-01
CURRENT
ARP217D
This document deals with ground and flight test of airplane installed Environmental Control Systems (ECS), Figure 1. The ECS provide an environment, controlled within specified operational limits of comfort and safety, for humans, animals, and equipment. These limits include the following: pressure, temperature, humidity, ventilation air velocity, ventilation rate, wall temperature, audible noise, vibration, and environment composition (ozone, contaminants, etc.). The ECS are composed of equipment, controls, and indicators that supply, distribute, recycle and exhaust air to maintain the desired environment.
Standard

Environmental Control System Contamination

1997-10-01
HISTORICAL
AIR1539A
This publication will be limited to a discussion of liquid and particulate contaminants which enter the aircraft through the environmental control system (ECS). Gaseous contaminants such as ozone, fuel vapors, sulphates, etc., are not covered in this AIR. It will cover all contamination sources which interface with ECS, and the effects of this contamination on equipment. Methods of control will be limited to the equipment and interfacing ducting which normally falls within the responsibility of the ECS designer.
Standard

ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL SYSTEM CONTAMINATION

1981-01-30
HISTORICAL
AIR1539
This publication will be limited to a discussion of liquid and particulate contaminants which enter the aircraft through the environmental control system (ECS). Gaseous contaminants such as ozone, fuel vapors, sulphates, etc., are not covered in this AIR. It will cover all contamination sources which interface with ECS, and the effects of this contamination on equipment. Methods of control will be limited to the equipment and interfacing ducting which normally falls within the responsiblity of the ECS designer.
Standard

Environmental Control System Contamination

2018-06-14
WIP
AIR1539C
This publication will be limited to a discussion of liquid and particulate contaminants which enter the aircraft through the environmental control system (ECS). Gaseous contaminants such as ozone, fuel vapors, sulphates, etc., are not covered in this AIR. It will cover all contamination sources which interface with ECS, and the effects of this contamination on equipment. Methods of control will be limited to the equipment and interfacing ducting which normally falls within the responsibility of the ECS designer.
Standard

Environmental Control System Contamination

2007-09-26
CURRENT
AIR1539B
This publication will be limited to a discussion of liquid and particulate contaminants which enter the aircraft through the environmental control system (ECS). Gaseous contaminants such as ozone, fuel vapors, sulphates, etc., are not covered in this AIR. It will cover all contamination sources which interface with ECS, and the effects of this contamination on equipment. Methods of control will be limited to the equipment and interfacing ducting which normally falls within the responsibility of the ECS designer.
Standard

Heater, Aircraft Internal Combustion Heat Exchanger Type

2013-02-14
CURRENT
AS8040B
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) covers combustion heaters used in the following applications: a Cabin heating (all occupied regions and windshield heating) b Wing and empennage anti-icing c Engine and accessory heating (when heater is installed as part of the aircraft) d Aircraft de-icing
Standard

General Requirements for Application of Vapor Cycle Refrigeration Systems for Aircraft

1997-10-01
HISTORICAL
ARP731B
Recommendations of this ARP refer specifically to the application of closed cycle vapor cycle refrigeration systems as a source of cooling in an aircraft air conditioning system. General recommendations for an air conditioning system which may include a vapor cycle system as a cooling source are included in ARP85, Air Conditioning Equipment, General Requirements for Subsonic Airplanes, ARP292, Air Conditioning, Helicopters, General Requirements For, and AIR806, Air Conditioning Design Information for Cargo and High Density Passenger Transport Airplanes, and are not included herein. Vapor cycle refrigeration system design recommendations are presented in this ARP in the following general areas: a SYSTEM Design Recommendations: (See Section 3) b COMPONENT Design Recommendations: (See Section 4) c Desirable Design Features: (See Section 5)
Standard

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR APPLICATION OF VAPOR CYCLE REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS FOR AIRCRAFT

1973-04-15
HISTORICAL
ARP731A
Recommendations of this ARP refer specifically to the application of closed cycle vapor cycle refrigeration systems as a source of cooling in an aircraft air conditioning system. General recommendations for an air conditioning system which may include a vapor cycle system as a cooling source are included in ARP 85, Air Conditioning Equipment, General Requirements for Subsonic Airplanes, ARP 292, Air Conditioning, Helicopters, General Requirements For, and AIR 806, Air Conditioning Design Information for Cargo and High Density Passenger Transport Airplanes, and are not included herein.
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