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Training / Education

Turbocharging Internal Combustion Engines

2019-09-16
The need to control emissions and maintain fuel economy is driving the use of advanced turbocharging technology in both diesel and gasoline engines. As the use of diesel engines in passenger car gasoline and diesel engines increases, a greater focus on advanced turbocharging technology is emerging in an effort to reap the benefits obtained from turbocharging and engine downsizing. This seminar covers the basic concepts of turbocharging of gasoline and diesel engines (light and heavy duty), including turbocharger matching and charge air and EGR cooling, as well as associated controls.
Training / Education

Fundamental Concepts of Turbocharging Modern Engines Current Practices and Trends

2019-06-18
Turbocharging is rapidly becoming an integral part of many internal combustion engine systems. While it has long been a key to diesel engine performance, it is increasingly seen as an enabler in meeting many of the efficiency and performance requirements of modern automotive gasoline engines. This web seminar will discuss the basic concepts of turbocharging and air flow management of four-stroke engines. The course will explore the fundamentals of turbocharging, system design features, performance measures, and matching and selection criteria.
Standard

Lubricating Oils, Aircraft Piston Engine (Non-Dispersant Mineral Oil)

1991-06-01
HISTORICAL
J1966_199106
This SAE Standard establishes the requirements for lubricating oils containing ashless dispersant additives to be used in four-stroke cycle, reciprocating piston aircraft engines. This document covers the same lubricating oil requirements as the former military specification MIL-L-22851. Users should consult their airframe or engine manufacturers manuals for the latest listing of acceptable lubricants.
Standard

Lubricating Oils, Aircraft Piston Engine (Non-Dispersant Mineral Oil)

1989-12-01
HISTORICAL
J1966_198912
This SAE Standard establishes the requirements for lubricating oils containing ashless dispersant additives to be used in four-stroke cycle, reciprocating piston aircraft engines. This document covers the same lubricating oil requirements as the former military specification MIL-L-22851. Users should consult their airframe or engine manufacturers manuals for the latest listing of acceptable lubricants.
Standard

Lubricating Oils, Aircraft Piston Engine(Non-Dispersant Mineral Oil)

2000-06-08
HISTORICAL
J1966_200006
This SAE Standard establishes the requirements for nondispersant, mineral lubricating oils to be used in four-stroke cycle piston aircraft engines. This document covers the same lubricating oil requirements as the former military specification MIL-L-6082. Users should consult their airframe or engine manufacturers manuals for the latest listing of acceptable lubricants.
Standard

Lubricating Oils, Aircraft Piston Engine (Non-Dispersant Mineral Oil)

2005-07-31
HISTORICAL
J1966_200507
This SAE Standard establishes the requirements for nondispersant, mineral lubricating oils to be used in four-stroke cycle piston aircraft engines. This document covers the same lubricating oil requirements as the former military specification MIL-L-6082. Users should consult their airframe or engine manufacturers manuals for the latest listing of acceptable lubricants.
Standard

SAE MANUAL ON BLAST CLEANING

1968-06-01
CURRENT
J792A_196806
Blast cleaning may be defined as a secondary manufacturing process in which a suitable stream of solid particles is propelled with sufficient velocity against a work surface to cause a cleaning or abrading action when it comes in contact with the workpiece. As indicated in the definition, blast cleaning may be employed for a variety of purposes. Ordinarily, it is considered as a method for removing sand from castings, burrs or scale from forgings, mill products, or heat treated parts; to promote machinability, and to minimize the possibility of interference in actual operation. In addition to this use, blast cleaning also produces an excellent surface for industrial coatings. All these objectives are often accomplished in the one operation.
Standard

Bumper Jack Requirements--Motor Vehicles

1967-01-01
HISTORICAL
J979_196701
The following requirements and test information can be used to obtain reasonable quality and uniformity for bumper jacks. For this specification, a fully loaded vehicle includes curb weight, optional equipment, weight at 150 lb each for specified number of passengers, and a 150 lb load in the trunk. Vehicles with a gvw rating will be loaded to the maximum specified gvw.
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