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Book

Electronic Transmission Controls

2000-06-10
The evolution of the automotive transmission has changed rapidly in the last decade, partly due to the advantages of highly sophisticated electronic controls. This evolution has resulted in modern automatic transmissions that offer more control, stability, and convenience to the driver. Electronic Transmission Controls contains 68 technical papers from SAE and other international organizations written since 1995 on this rapidly growing area of automotive electronics. This book breaks down the topic into two sections. The section on Stepped Transmissions covers recent developments in regular and 4-wheel drive transmissions from major auto manufacturers including DaimlerChrysler, General Motors, Toyota, Honda, and Ford. Technology covered in this section includes: smooth shift control; automatic transmission efficiency; mechatronic systems; fuel saving technologies; shift control using information from vehicle navigation systems; and fuzzy logic control.
Standard

Top Speed Test Procedure for Electric Motorcycles

2014-02-21
CURRENT
J3007_201402
This SAE Recommended Practice incorporates a track-based test procedure that produces a representative value for vehicle top speed when operating on a level paved road with a fully charged battery.
Standard

Connections for On-Board Road Vehicle Electrical Wiring Harnesses - Part 1: Single-Pole Connectors - Flat Blade Terminals - Dimensional Characteristics and Specific Requirements

2011-12-20
CURRENT
J2223/1_201112
This SAE Standard specifies dimensional characteristics of flat blades of single-pole connectors and specific requirements for on-board electrical harnesses of road vehicles, which can be fitted into female connectors such as those given as in Appendix A. This document applies to connectors designed to be disconnected after mounting in the vehicle in the case of repair and/or maintenance only.
Standard

Snowmobile Stop Lamp

2011-03-12
CURRENT
J278_201103
This document provides test methods and requirements for the stop lamp on snowmobiles.
Book

Concepts in Turbocharging for Improved Efficiency and Emissions Reduction

2014-09-22
Legislative requirements to reduce CO2 emissions by 2020 have resulted in significant efforts by car manufacturers to explore various methods of pollution abatement. One of the most effective ways found so far is by shortening the cylinder stroke and downsizing the engine. This new engine then needs to be boosted, or turbocharged, to create the full and original load torque. Turbocharging has been and will continue to be a key component to the new technologies that will make a positive difference in the next-generation engines of years to come. Concepts in Turbocharging for Improved Efficiency and Emissions Reduction explores the many ways that turbocharging will deliver concrete results in meeting the new realities of sustainable, green transportation.
Standard

Hydraulic Motor Test Procedures

2009-06-12
CURRENT
J746_200906
This test code describes tests for determining characteristics of hydraulic positive displacement motors as used on construction and industrial machinery as referenced in SAE J1116. These characteristics are to be recorded on data sheets similar to the one shown in Figure 1. Two sets of data sheets are to be submitted: one at 49 °C (120 °F) and one at 82 °C (180 °F).
Standard

Classification System for Thermoplastic Elastomers

2005-10-10
HISTORICAL
J2558_200510
This SAE Standard provides a system for specifying significant material properties of thermoplastic elastomers (TPEs) that are intended for, but not limited to, use in automotive applications. NOTE 1—For the purposes of this document a TPE is defined as a polymeric material that, without further chemical modifications, is capable of recovering from deformations quickly and forcibly and is also capable of being repeatedly softened by heating and hardened by cooling within a temperature range characteristic of the material. NOTE 2—When the TPE product is to be used for purposes where the requirements are too specific to be completely prescribed by this classification system, it is necessary for the purchaser to consult the supplier in advance to establish the appropriate properties, test methods, and specification test limits.
Standard

Instrusion Resistance of Safety Glazing Systems for Road Vehicles

2001-04-24
HISTORICAL
J2568_200104
This SAE Recommended Practice specifies an intrusion resistance test method for glazing systems installed in motor vehicles. Intrusion resistance performance is determined not solely by the glazing but also by the glazing attachment to the vehicle and by the vehicle structure. Therefore, the glazing/ attachment /vehicle structure must be tested as a single unit. This test determines intrusion resistance only. The test applies to those materials that meet the requirements for use as safety glazing materials as specified in Safety Standard ANSI/SAE Z26.1 or other applicable standards. The test applies to all installation locations.
Standard

Intrusion Resistance of Safety Glazing Systems for Road Vehicles

2003-02-12
HISTORICAL
J2568_200302
This SAE Recommended Practice specifies an intrusion resistance test method for glazing systems installed in motor vehicles. Intrusion resistance performance is determined not solely by the glazing but also by the glazing attachment to the vehicle and by the vehicle structure. Therefore, the glazing/ attachment /vehicle structure must be tested as a single unit. This test determines intrusion resistance only. The test applies to those materials that meet the requirements for use as safety glazing materials as specified in Safety Standard ANSI/SAE Z26.1 or other applicable standards. The test applies to all installation locations.
Standard

Positive Temperature Coefficient Overcurrent Protection Devices (PTCs)

2014-12-03
CURRENT
J2685_201412
This SAE Recommended Practice defines the test conditions, procedures, and performance requirements for PTC (positive temperature coefficient of resistance) overcurrent protection devices. PTCs are typically either polymeric (PPTC) or ceramic (CPTC). It is important to note battery voltages versus powernets/system voltage versus max battery voltages: (12 V/14 V/16 V, 24 V/28 V/32 V, and 36 V/42 V/58 V). All voltages are DC. These devices are typically rated with a maximum operating voltage, which for vehicular systems need to be 16 V (for 12 V batteries), 32 V (for 24 V batteries), and 58 V (for 36 V batteries/42 V powernets). PTC devices are considered to be self-resetting after responding to overcurrent conditions and after such condition has been removed from the affected circuit containing the PTC.
Standard

Standard Method for Determining Continuous Upper Temperature Resistance of Elastomers

1999-05-01
HISTORICAL
J2236_199905
This method is intended to define the continuous upper temperature resistance (CUTR) of thermoplastic elastomers and thermoset rubber with durometer hardness less than or equal to 90 Shore A, to oxidation or other degradation when exposed solely to hot air for an extended period of time. This method established the upper thermal aging limits of commercially available compounds as measured at 23 °C by retention of at least 50% original elongation and tensile at break after 1008 h of heat aging. This method does not take into account nor measure the effects of stress, environment, or temperature variations on the thermal aging characteristics of the materials tested. This method may involve hazardous materials, operations, and equipment. This SAE Standard does not address the safety problems associated with its use.
Standard

Standard Method for Determining Continuous Upper Temperature Resistance of Elastomers

1992-06-01
HISTORICAL
J2236_199206
This method is intended to define the continuous upper temperature resistance (CUTR) of thermoplastic elastomers and thermoset rubber with durometer hardness =90 Shore A, to oxidation or other degradation when exposed solely to hot air for an extended period of time This method established the upper thermal aging limits of commercially available compounds as measured at 23 °C by retention of at least 50% original elongation and tensile at break after 1008 h of heat aging. This method does not take into account nor measure the effects of stress, environment, or temperature variations on the thermal aging characteristics of the materials tested. This method may involve hazardous materials, operations, and equipment. This SAE Standard does not address the safety problems associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this document to consult and establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.
Standard

Crane Boomstop

2017-10-09
CURRENT
J220_201710
This SAE Recommended Practice applies to the boomstop for the main boom of all mobile construction type cranes having rope supported booms, equipped for hook work, clamshell, magnet, grapple, or concrete bucket attachments.
Standard

Connections for On-Board Road Vehicle Electrical Wiring Harnesses - Part 3: Multipole Connectors - Flat Blade Terminals - Dimensional Characteristics and Specific Requirements

2011-12-20
CURRENT
J2223/3_201112
This SAE Standard defines dimensional characteristics of existing flat blades of multipole connectors and specific requirements for on-board electrical harnesses of road vehicles. This document applies to connectors designed to be disconnected after mounting in the vehicle in the case of repair and/or maintenance only.
Standard

Crane Boomstop

2012-02-06
HISTORICAL
J220_201202
This SAE Recommended Practice applies to the boomstop for the main boom of all mobile construction type cranes having rope supported booms, equipped for hook work, clamshell, magnet, grapple, or concrete bucket attachments.
Standard

Chemical Stress Resistance of Polymers

2008-02-08
CURRENT
J2016_200802
This SAE Recommended Practice provides a screening procedure for evaluating the susceptibility of plastics to environmental stress cracking by testing their resistance to pure solvents or their mixtures. This method can be used to evaluate effect of complex chemical mixtures with unknown or suspect components, which may be encountered in the polymer's environment. The list of chemicals in Appendix A is intended only to serve as a guide and does not exclude any chemical that may represent the environment the polymer is subjected to in a specific application. As specific environment and exposure conditions are application dependent and could vary significantly from one application to another, the user of the document is recommended to choose the appropriate solvents relevant to the actual application enviroment and is not under any obligation to test the effect of all the chemicals listed in Appendix A.
Standard

Chemical Stress Resistance of Polymers

1989-06-01
HISTORICAL
J2016_198906
This recommended practice provides a screening procedure for evaluating the susceptibility of plastics to environmental stress cracking by testing their resistance to pure solvents. This method can then be used to evaluate complex chemical mixtures with components identified as suspect, which are expected to be present in the polymer's environment. It is recommended that ASTM D 543, Resistance of Plastics to Chemical Reagents, also be conducted. This test evaluates chemical effects that can cause changes in polymer weight, dimension, appearance or strength.
Standard

Chemical Stress Resistance of Polymers

1999-11-29
HISTORICAL
J2016_199911
This SAE Recommended Practice provides a screening procedure for evaluating the susceptibility of plastics to environmental stress cracking by testing their resistance to pure solvents or their mixtures. This method can be used to evaluate effect of complex chemical mixtures with unknown or suspect components, which may be encountered in the polymer's environment. The list of chemicals in Appendix A is intended only to serve as a guide and does not exclude any chemical that may represent the environment the polymer is subjected to in a specific application. As specific environment and exposure conditions are application dependent and could vary significantly from one application to another, the user of the document is recommended to choose the appropriate solvents relevant to the actual application enviroment and is not under any obligation to test the effect of all the chemicals listed in Appendix A.
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