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Standard

Thermophysical Properties of the Natural Environment, Gases, Liquids, and Solids

1991-10-01
HISTORICAL
AIR1168/9
This AIR is arranged in the following four sections: 2A - Properties of the Natural Environment 2B - Properties of Gases 2C - Properties of Liquids 2D - Properties of Solids A summary of each section is given below. Section 2A - This section includes currently applicable earth atmosphere standards (Refs. 101 and 103) and data on the near-Earth environment. Limited data on Mars and Venus reflected solar and planetary-emitted radiation and on micrometeorite data are also included. For space vehicle applications, environmental models are of two general types: orbital and reentry. For orbital models, variable properties such as time and solar flux are usually averaged. Reentry atmospheres are chiefly a function of location and altitude, and selection may be based on reentry location. Variation with latitude is an important local effect (Ref. 106). The electromagnetic solar radiation data in this section are for altitudes above the Earth’s atmosphere.
Standard

Airborne Chemicals in Aircraft Cabins

2005-02-09
CURRENT
AIR4766/2
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) provides information on aircraft cabin air quality, including: Airborne contaminant gases, vapors, and aerosols. Identified potential sources. Comfort, health and safety issues. Airborne chemical measurement. Regulations and standards. Operating conditions and equipment that may cause aircraft cabin contamination by airborne chemicals (including Failure Conditions and normal Commercial Practices). Airborne chemical control systems. It does not deal with airflow requirements.
Standard

Aerospace Vehicle Cryogenic Duct Systems

2011-08-10
CURRENT
ARP735A
This Aerospace Recommended Practice outlines the design, installation, testing and field maintenance criteria for aerospace vehicle cryogenic duct systems. These recommendations are considered currently applicable guides and are subject to revision due to the continuing development within industry.
Standard

Spacecraft Boost and Entry Heat Transfer

2008-02-19
HISTORICAL
AIR1168/11
The prediction of vehicle temperatures during ascent through the earth’s atmosphere requires an accurate knowledge of the aerodynamic heating rates occurring at the vehicle surface. Flight parameters required in heating calculations include the local airstream velocity, pressure, and temperature at the boundary layer edge for the vehicle location in question. In addition, thermodynamic and transport air properties are required at these conditions. Both laminar and turbulent boundary layers occur during the boost trajectory. Experience has shown that laminar and turbulent heating are of equivalent importance. Laminar heating predominates in importance in the stagnation areas, but the large afterbody surfaces are most strongly affected by turbulent heating. Once the local flow conditions and corresponding air properties have been obtained, the convective heating rate may be calculated for a particular wall temperature.
Standard

Spacecraft Boost and Entry Heat Transfer

2011-07-25
CURRENT
AIR1168/11A
The prediction of vehicle temperatures during ascent through the earth’s atmosphere requires an accurate knowledge of the aerodynamic heating rates occurring at the vehicle surface. Flight parameters required in heating calculations include the local airstream velocity, pressure, and temperature at the boundary layer edge for the vehicle location in question. In addition, thermodynamic and transport air properties are required at these conditions. Both laminar and turbulent boundary layers occur during the boost trajectory. Experience has shown that laminar and turbulent heating are of equivalent importance. Laminar heating predominates in importance in the stagnation areas, but the large afterbody surfaces are most strongly affected by turbulent heating. Once the local flow conditions and corresponding air properties have been obtained, the convective heating rate may be calculated for a particular wall temperature.
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