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Training / Education

Corrosion Engineering and Prevention

The transportation industry, including motor vehicles, aircraft, rail, marine, commercial, off-road and defense vehicles, as well as infrastructures, energy sectors, raw materials, manufacturing, health and food industries all experience significant issues with corrosion which results in billions of dollars of loss each year. Corrosion education and prevention is essential to improve and increase the service life of parts and components which may have a significant impact on the economy of various industries and nations.
Training / Education

Fuel Systems Material Selection and Compatibility with Alternative Fuels

2019-08-27
This course will introduce the participants to the factors governing fuel-material compatibility and methods to predict and empirically determine compatibility for new alternative fuel chemistries.  By understanding the mechanisms and factors associated with chemically-induced degradation, participants will be able to assess the impact of fuel chemistry to infrastructure components, including those associated with vehicle fuel systems.  This course is unique in that it looks at compatibility from a fuel chemistry perspective, especially new fuel types such as alcohols and other biofuels. 
Training / Education

Materials Degradation in Mechanical Design Wear, Corrosion, Fatigue and their Interactions

2019-04-09
Materials degradation from environmental conditions is a common factor that will often occur in mechanical equipment used in every type of environment. These processes can frequently materialize in unpredicted and harmful ways, especially when they interact and lead to early component damage or failure. This five-session course will summarize the mechanisms that cause materials and mechanical components to degrade in service through exposure to deleterious mechanical and environmental conditions.
Standard

ELECTROMAGNETIC TESTING BY EDDY CURRENT METHODS

1991-03-01
HISTORICAL
J425_199103
The purpose of this SAE Information Report is to provide general information relative to the nature and use of eddy current techniques for nondestructive testing. The document is not intended to provide detailed technical information but to serve as an introduction to the principles and capabilities of eddy current testing, and as a guide to more extensive references listed in Section 2.
Standard

Split Type Bushings – Design and Application

2011-06-13
CURRENT
J835_201106
This SAE Standard presents the standard sizes, important dimensions, specialized measurement techniques, and tolerances for split type bushings. Both SI and inch sizes are shown; their dimensions are not exact equivalents. New designs shall use SI units. Unless specifically stated as ±, all tolerances are total.
Standard

Socket Wrenches, Hand (Metric)

2013-02-10
CURRENT
MA4534A
This SAE Aerospace Standard covers high strength commercial sockets and universal sockets which possess the strength, clearances, and internal wrenching design so configured that, when mated with hexagon (6 point) fasteners, they shall transmit torque to the fastener without bearing on the outer 5% of the fastener’s wrenching points. This document provides additional requirements beyond ANSI B107.5 appropriate for aerospace use. Inclusion of dimensional data in this document is not intended to imply all of the products described therein are stock production sizes. Consumers are requested to consult with manufacturers concerning lists of stock production sizes.
Standard

Use of Terms Yield Strength and Yield Point

2002-02-27
HISTORICAL
J450_200202
The purpose of this SAE Recommended Practice is to describe the terms yield strength and yield point. Included are definitions for both terms and recommendations for their use and application.
Standard

SINTERED CARBIDE TOOLS

1977-02-01
HISTORICAL
J439_197702
This recommended practice covers methods for measuring or evaluating five properties or characteristics of sintered carbide which contribute significantly to the performance of sintered carbide tools. These properties are: hardness, specific gravity, apparent porosity, structure, and grain size. They are covered under separate headings below.
Standard

Ball Joints

2012-10-15
CURRENT
J490_201210
This SAE Standard covers the general and dimensional data for various types of ball joints with inch threads commonly used on control linkages in automotive, marine, and construction and industrial equipment applications. Inasmuch as the load carrying and wear capabilities of ball joints vary considerably with their design and fabrication, it is suggested that the manufacturers be consulted in regard to these features and for recommendations relating to application of the different types and styles available. The inclusion of dimensional data in this standard is not intended to imply that all the products described are stock production sizes. Consumers are requested to consult with manufacturers concerning availability of stock production parts.
Standard

SOLDERS

1962-06-01
HISTORICAL
J473_196206
The choice of the type and grade of solder for any specific purpose will depend on the materials to be joined and the method of applying. Those with higher amounts of tin usually wet and bond more readily and have a narrower semi-molten range than lower amounts of tin. For strictly economic reasons, it is recommended that the grade of solder metal be selected that contains least amount of tin required to give suitable flowing and adhesive qualities for application. All the lead-tin solders, with or without antimony, are usually suitable for joining steel and copper base alloys. For galvanized steel or zinc, only Class A solders should be used. Class B solders, containing antimony usually as a substitute for some of the tin or to increase strength and hardness of the filler metal, form intermetallic antimony-zinc compounds, causing the joint to become embrittled. Lead-tin solders are not recommended for joining aluminum, magnesium, or stainless steel.
Standard

Solders

2018-08-24
CURRENT
J473_201808
The choice of the type and grade of solder for any specific purpose will depend on the materials to be joined and the method of applying. Those with higher amounts of tin usually wet and bond more readily and have a narrower semi-molten range than lower amounts of tin. For strictly economic reasons, it is recommended that the grade of solder metal be selected that contains least amount of tin required to give suitable flowing and adhesive qualities for application. All the lead-tin solders, with or without antimony, are usually suitable for joining steel and copper base alloys. For galvanized steel or zinc, only Class A solders should be used. Class B solders, containing antimony usually as a substitute for some of the tin or to increase strength and hardness of the filler metal, form intermetallic antimony-zinc compounds, causing the joint to become embrittled. Lead-tin solders are not recommended for joining aluminum, magnesium, or stainless steel.
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