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Standard

Mechanical Properties of Heat Treated Wrought Steels

2011-10-27
CURRENT
J413_201110
The figures in this SAE Information Report illustrate the principle that, regardless of composition, steels of the same cross-sectional hardness produced by tempering after through hardening will have approximately the same longitudinal1 tensile strength at room temperature. Figure 1 shows the relation between hardness and longitudinal tensile strength of 0.30 to 0.50% carbon steels in the fully hardened and tempered, as rolled, normalized, and annealed conditions. Figure 2 showing the relation between longitudinal tensile strength and yield strength, and Figure 3 illustrating longitudinal tensile strength versus reduction of area, are typical of steels in the quenched and tempered condition. Figure 3 shows the direct relationship between ductility and hardness and illustrates the fact that the reduction of area decreases as hardness increases, and that, for a given hardness, the reduction of area is generally higher for alloy steels than for plain carbon steels.
Standard

Selecting and Specifying Hot-Rolled Steel Bar Products

2010-03-01
CURRENT
J2281_201003
This SAE Information Report relates to hot-rolled steel bar products. It is intended as a guideline to assist in the selection and specification of hot-rolled steel bar; however, it is not to be interpreted as a material specification in itself.
Standard

High-Strength Carbon and Alloy Die Drawn Steels

2009-11-24
CURRENT
J935_200911
This SAE Recommended Practice is intended to provide basic information on properties and characteristics of high-strength carbon and alloy steels which have been subjected to special die drawing. This includes both cold drawing with heavier-than-normal drafts and die drawing at elevated temperatures.
Standard

Mechanical Properties of Heat Treated Wrought Steels

2002-02-27
HISTORICAL
J413_200202
The figures in this SAE Information Report illustrate the principle that, regardless of composition, steels of the same cross-sectional hardness produced by tempering after through hardening will have approximately the same longitudinal tensile strength at room temperature. Figure 1 shows the relation between hardness and longitudinal tensile strength of 0.30 to 0.50% carbon steels in the fully hardened and tempered, as rolled, normalized, and annealed conditions. Figure 2 showing the relation between longitudinal tensile strength and yield strength, and Figure 3 illustrating longitudinal tensile strength versus reduction of area, are typical of steels in the quenched and tempered condition. Figure 3 shows the direct relationship between ductility and hardness and illustrates the fact that the reduction of area decreases as hardness increases, and that, for a given hardness, the reduction of area is generally higher for alloy steels than for plain carbon steels.
Standard

High-Strength, Hot-Rolled Steel Bars

2003-09-24
CURRENT
J1442_200309
This SAE Recommended Practice covers two levels of high strength structural low-alloy steel bars having minimum Yield Points of 345 MPa (50 ksi) and 450 MPa (65 ksi). The two strength levels are 345 and 450 MPa or 50 and 65 ksi minimum yield point. Different chemical compositions are used to achieve the specified mechanical properties. In some cases there are significant differences in chemical composition for the same strength level, depending on the fabricating requirements. It should be noted that although the mechanical properties for a steel grade sourced from different suppliers may be the same, the chemical composition may vary significantly. The fabricator should be aware that certain compositional differences may effect the forming, welding, and/or service requirements of the material. It is therefore recommended that the fabricator consult with the producer to understand the effect of chemical composition.
Standard

Selection and Use of Steels

2012-03-12
CURRENT
J401_201203
The SAE system of designating steels, described in SAE J402, classifies and numbers them according to chemical composition. In the case of the dent resistant, high strength and ultra high strength steels in SAE J2340, advanced high strength steels described in SAE J2745, and the high strength steels in SAE J1442 and the high-strength carbon and alloy die drawn steels in SAE J935, minimum mechanical property requirements have been included in the designations. In addition, hardenability data on most of the alloy steels and some of the carbon steels will be found in SAE J1268.
Standard

ESTIMATED MECHANICAL PROPERTIES AND MACHINABILITY OF STEEL BARS

1992-05-01
CURRENT
J1397_199205
This SAE Information Report is intended to provide a guide to mechanical and machinability characteristics of some SAE steel grades. The ratings and properties shown are provided as general information and not as requirements for specifications unless each instance is approved by the source of supply. The data are based on resources which may no longer be totally accurate. However, this report is retained as a service in lieu of current data.
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