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Standard

Electrical and Electronic Equipment Cooling in Commercial Transports

1992-09-01
CURRENT
AIR64B
This document considers the cooling of equipment installed in equipment centers, which usually consist of rack-mounted equipment and panel mounted equipment in the flight deck. In instances where these two locations result in different requirements, these are identified. For purposes of this document, the cooled equipment is referred to generally as E/E equipment, denoting that both electrical and electronic equipment is considered, or as an E/E equipment line-replaceable-unit (LRU). The majority of cooled equipment takes the form of LRUs. This document primarily relates to E/E equipment which is designed to use forced air cooling in order to maintain the equipment within acceptable environmental limits, in order to maintain equipment operating performance (within acceptable tolerances), and to maintain reliability. Cooling may be applied internally or externally to the case of the item of E/E equipment.
Standard

AIRCRAFT HUMIDIFICATION

1982-04-30
HISTORICAL
AIR1609
This report covers the design parameters for various methods of humidification applicable to aircraft, the physiological aspects of low humidities, the possible benefits of controlling cabin humidity, the penalties associated with humidification, and the problems which must be solved for practical aircraft humidification systems. The design information is applicable to commercial and military aircraft. The physiological aspects cover all aircraft environmental control applications.
Standard

FAULT ISOLATION IN ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL SYSTEMS OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORTS

1977-08-01
HISTORICAL
AIR1266
This AIR outlines concepts for the design and use of fault isolation equipment that have general application. However, the specific concern applies only to use with Environmental Control Systems in commercial transports. In particular, automatic Built In Test Equipment (BITE) with manual initiation and software programs are covered as systems already in use.
Standard

Fault Isolation in Environmental Control Systems of Commercial Transports

1993-11-01
CURRENT
AIR1266A
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) outlines concepts for the design and use of fault isolation equipment that have general application. The specific focus is on fault isolation of environmental control systems (ECS) in commercial transports. Presented are general fault isolation purposes, design principles, and demonstration of compliance criteria. These are followed by three design examples to aid in understanding the design principles. Future trends in built-in-test-equipment (BITE) design are discussed, some of which represent concepts already being implemented on new equipment.
Standard

THE ADVANCED ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL SYSTEM (AECS) COMPUTER PROGRAM FOR STEADY STATE ANALYSIS AND PRELIMINARY SYSTEM SIZING

1986-10-01
HISTORICAL
AIR1706A
Many different computer programs have been developed to determine performance capabilities of aircraft environmental control systems, and to calculate size and weight tradeoffs during preliminary design. Many of these computer programs are limited in scope to a particular arrangement of components for a specific application. General techniques, providing flexibility to handle varied types of ECS configurations and different requirements (i.e., during conceptual or preliminary design, development, testing, production, and operation) are designated "company proprietary" and are not available for industry-wide use. This document describes capabilities, limitations, and potentials of a particular computer program which provides a general ECS analysis capability, and is available for use in industry. This program, names AECS1, was developed under the sponsorship of the U.S. Air Force Flight Dynamics Laboratory (References 1 and 2).
Standard

The Advanced Environmental Control System (AECS) Computer Program for Steady State Analysis and Preliminary System Sizing

1997-10-01
HISTORICAL
AIR1706B
Many different computer programs have been developed to determine performance capabilities of aircraft environmental control systems, and to calculate size and weight tradeoffs during preliminary design. Many of these computer programs are limited in scope to a particular arrangement of components for a specific application. General techniques, providing flexibility to handle varied types of ECS configurations and different requirements (i.e., during conceptual or preliminary design, development, testing, production, and operation) are designated “company proprietary” and are not available for industry-wide use. This document describes capabilities, limitations, and potentials of a particular computer program which provides a general ECS analysis capability, and is available for use in industry. This program, names AECS1, was developed under the sponsorship of the U.S. Air Force Flight Dynamics Laboratory (References 1 and 2).
Standard

Spacecraft Life Support Systems

2012-10-15
CURRENT
AIR1168/14A
A life support system (LSS) is usually defined as a system that provides elements necessary for maintaining human life and health in the state required for performing a prescribed mission. The LSS, depending upon specific design requirements, will provide pressure, temperature, and composition of local atmosphere, food, and water. It may or may not collect, dispose, or reprocess wastes such as carbon dioxide, water vapor, urine, and feces. It can be seen from the preceding definition that LSS requirements may differ widely, depending on the mission specified, such as operation in Earth orbit or lunar mission. In all cases the time of operation is an important design factor. An LSS is sometimes briefly defined as a system providing atmospheric control and water, waste, and thermal management.
Standard

Spacecraft Life Support Systems

1994-01-01
HISTORICAL
AIR1168/14
A life support system (LSS) is usually defined as a system that provides elements necessary for maintaining human life and health in the state required for performing a prescribed mission. The LSS, depending upon specific design requirements, will provide pressure, temperature, and composition of local atmosphere, food, and water. It may or may not collect, dispose, or reprocess wastes such as carbon dioxide, water vapor, urine, and feces. It can be seen from the preceding definition that LSS requirements may differ widely, depending on the mission specified, such as operation in Earth orbit or lunar mission. In all cases the time of operation is an important design factor. An LSS is sometimes briefly defined as a system providing atmospheric control and water, waste, and thermal management.
Standard

TEMPERATURE CONTROL EQUIPMENT, AUTOMATIC, AIRCRAFT COMPARTMENT

1992-03-01
HISTORICAL
ARP89C
The recommendations of this ARP are primarily intended to be applicable to temperature control of compartments, occupied or unoccupied, of civil aircraft whose prime function is the transporting of passengers or cargo. The recommendations will apply, however, to a much broader category of civil and military aircraft where automatic temperature control systems are applicable.
Standard

Air Cycle Air Conditioning Systems for Military Air Vehicles

2018-09-17
WIP
AS4073B
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) defines the requirements for air cycle air conditioning systems used on military air vehicles for cooling, heating, ventilation, and moisture and contamination control. General recommendations for an air conditioning system, which may include an air cycle system as a cooling source, are included in MIL-E-18927E (AS) and JSSG-2009. Air cycle air conditioning systems include those components which condition high temperature and high pressure air for delivery to occupied and equipment compartments and to electrical and electronic equipment. This document is applicable to open and closed loop air cycle systems. Definitions are contained in Section 5 of this document.
Standard

Air Cycle Air Conditioning Systems for Military Air Vehicles

2000-03-01
HISTORICAL
AS4073
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) defines the requirements for air cycle air conditioning systems used on military air vehicles for cooling, heating, ventilation, and moisture and contamination control. General recommendations for an air conditioning system, which may include an air cycle system as a cooling source, are included in MIL-E-18927E (AS) and MIL-E-87145 (USAF). Air cycle air conditioning systems include those components which condition high temperature and high pressure air for delivery to occupied and equipment compartments and to electrical and electronic equipment. This document is applicable to open and closed loop air cycle systems. Definitions are contained in Section 5 of this document.
Standard

Air Cycle Air Conditioning Systems for Military Air Vehicles

2013-08-06
CURRENT
AS4073A
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) defines the requirements for air cycle air conditioning systems used on military air vehicles for cooling, heating, ventilation, and moisture and contamination control. General recommendations for an air conditioning system, which may include an air cycle system as a cooling source, are included in MIL-E-18927E (AS) and JSSG-2009. Air cycle air conditioning systems include those components which condition high temperature and high pressure air for delivery to occupied and equipment compartments and to electrical and electronic equipment. This document is applicable to open and closed loop air cycle systems. Definitions are contained in Section 5 of this document.
Standard

Aircraft Cabin Pressurization Criteria

2010-05-11
CURRENT
ARP1270B
This ARP covers the basic criteria for the design of cabin pressure control systems (CPCS) for general aviation, commercial and military pressurized aircraft.
Standard

Environmental Control Systems for Helicopters

1998-01-01
CURRENT
ARP292C
This ARP discusses design philosophy, system and equipment requirements, environmental conditions, and design considerations for helicopter environmental control systems (ECS). The helicopter ECS comprises that arrangement of equipment, controls, and indicators which supply and distribute dehumidified conditioned air for ventilation, cooling and heating of the occupied compartments, and cooling of the avionics. The principal features of the system are: a A controlled fresh air supply b A means for cooling (air or vapor cycle units and heat exchangers) c A means for removing excess moisture from the air supply d A means for heating e A temperature control system f A conditioned air distribution system The ARP is applicable to both civil and military helicopters where an ECS is specified; however, certain requirements peculiar to military applications, such as nuclear, biological and chemical (NBC) protection, are not covered.
Standard

Engine Bleed Air Systems for Aircraft

2015-07-13
CURRENT
ARP1796B
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) discusses design philosophy, system and equipment requirements, installation environment and design considerations for military and commercial aircraft systems within the Air Transport Association (ATA) ATA 100 specification, Chapter 36, Pneumatic. This ATA system/chapter covers equipment used to deliver compressed air from a power source to connecting points for other systems such as air conditioning, pressurization, ice protection, cross-engine starting, air turbine motors, air driven hydraulic pumps, on board oxygen generating systems (OBOGS), on board inert gas generating systems (OBIGGS), and other pneumatic demands. The engine bleed air system includes components for preconditioning the compressed air (temperature, pressure or flow regulation), ducting to distribute high or low pressure air to the using systems, and sensors/instruments to indicate temperature and pressure levels within the system.
Standard

Engine Bleed Air Systems for Aircraft

1987-02-01
HISTORICAL
ARP1796
This ARP discusses design philosophy, system and equipment requirements, installation environment and design considerations for systems within the ATA 100 specification, Chapter 36, Pneumatic (reference 1). This ATA system/chapter covers equipment used to deliver compressed air from a power source to connecting points for other systems such as air conditioning, pressurization, anti-icing, cross-engine starting, air turbine motors, air driven hydraulic pumps, and other pneumatic demands. The engine bleed air system includes components for preconditioning the compressed air (temperature, pressure or flow regulation), ducting to distribute high or low pressure air to the using systems, and sensors/instruments to indicate temperature and pressure levels within the system. The engine bleed air system interfaces with the following ATA 100 systems: The interface with these systems/chapters is at the inlet of the shutoff/control valve of each associated system.
Standard

Guide for Qualification Testing of Aircraft Air Valves

2015-05-29
CURRENT
ARP986D
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) defines recommended analysis and test procedures for qualification of pneumatically, electrically, manually, and hydraulically actuated air valves. They may be further defined as valves that function in response to externally applied forces or in response to variations in upstream and/or downstream duct air conditions in order to maintain a calibrated duct air condition (e.g., air flow, air pressure, air temperature, air pressure ratio, or air shutoff). Qualification testing performed on the airplane to verify compatibility of the valve function and stability as part of a complete system is outside the scope of this document. Refer to ARP1270 for design and certification requirements for cabin pressurization control system components. As this document is only a guide, it does not supersede or relieve any requirements contained in detailed Customer specifications.
Standard

Heat Sinks for Airborne Vehicles

2002-09-16
HISTORICAL
AIR1957
This document summarizes types of heat sinks and considerations in relation to the general requirements of aircraft heat sources, and it provides information to achieve efficient utilization and management of these heat sinks. In this document, a heat sink is defined as a body or substance used for removal of the heat generated by hydrodynamic or thermodynamic processes. This document provides general data about airborne heat sources, heat sinks, and modes of heat transfer. The document also discusses approaches to control the use of heat sinks and techniques for analysis and verification of heat sink management. The heat sinks are for aircraft operating at subsonic and supersonic speeds.
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