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Training / Education

Failure Mode and Effect Analysis for Product/Process Development

The automotive industry is undergoing fierce competition globally. To increase competitiveness, automotive OEMs and suppliers are striving for improving quality and customer satisfaction, eliminating warranty, and reducing product development cycle time. This seminar introduces the participants to FMEA, an effective and powerful quality improvement tool. The seminar prepares the participants to effectively identify failure modes, determine effects, concisely define root causes of the failure modes, and successfully develop and implement the corrective actions.
Training / Education

Engine Failure Investigation and Analysis

Engine failures can occur in a variety of equipment, vehicles, and applications. On occasion, a single vehicle type or equipment family will even experience multiple engine failures leading to the inevitable need to determine what the most likely cause of one or all of those failures was. This comprehensive seminar introduces participants to the methods and techniques used to understand the types of variables and inputs that can affect engine reliability and then determine the most likely cause of an individual engine or group of engine failures in the field.
Training / Education

Design and Process Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA)

This seminar covers the five types of FMEAs with emphasis on constructing Design and Process FMEAs. Each column of the FMEA document will be clearly explained using an actual FMEA example. The course covers various methods for identifying failure modes, effects and causes with special attention given to severity, occurrence, and detection tables and how to develop effective recommended actions strategies. Throughout the class, participants will be involved in exercises/actual projects that demonstrate and incorporate direct application of learned principles.
Training / Education

Tire Forensic Analysis

This course provides a detailed description of tire failure modes, their potential causes, identification, and the sometimes-subtle nuances that go along with determination of tire failure. In addition, proper inspection techniques of tires will be discussed and samples will be available to reinforce the concepts learned. The course is helpful for investigators and individuals who need to explore and explain tire failures and point out the failure contributing factors. The course will help to clarify failure root cause between tire production process deviation, tire design, and service application.
Training / Education

Design Verification Plan & Report (DVP&R) - Overview and Application

In this one-day seminar on Design Verification Plan and Report Overview and Application students will be introduced to important concepts, the basic theory behind the concepts, and discuss how these concepts can be applied to the client's design reliability activities. Participant involvement will be maximized to demonstrate and reinforce the concepts through reading assignments, group discussions, and exercises where students will begin a DVP&R on a client product.
Training / Education

Basic Tire Mechanics and Applications

This course introduces basic tire mechanics, including tire construction components based on application type, required sidewall stamping in accordance with DoT/ECE regulations, tread patterns, regulatory and research testing on quality, tire inspections and basic tire failure identification. The course will provide you with information that you can use immediately on-the-job and apply to your own vehicle. This course is practical in nature and supplemented with samples and hands-on activities. It serves as a good primer for the in-depth SAE Tire Forensic Analysis course.
Training / Education

Fundamentals of Fatigue Analysis

Fatigue is a structural failure mode that must be recognized and understood to develop products that meet life cycle durability requirements. In the age of lightweighting, fatigue strength is an important vehicle design requirement as engineers struggle to meet stringent weight constraints without adversely impacting durability. This technical concept course introduces the fatigue failure mode and analysis methods. It explains the physics of material fatigue, including damage accumulation that may progress to product failure over time, and it provides the needed foundation to develop effective fatigue prediction capabilities.
Training / Education

DFMEA Overview and Application

During this DFMEA Overview and Application course, participants will be introduced to important FMEA concepts, the basic theory behind the concepts, then discuss how these concepts can be applied to the customer's design FMEA activities. Participant activities include: reading assignments, group discussions, exercises, building Block Diagrams as a group, and beginning a DFMEA on a customer’s product.
Training / Education

Introduction to Failure Mode and Effects Analysis for Product and Process

2021-08-30
Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) is a systematic method for preventing failure through the discovery and mitigation of potential failure modes and their cause mechanisms. Actions are developed in a team environment and address each high: severity, occurrence or detection ranking indicated by the analysis. Completed FMEA actions result in improved product performance, reduced warranty and increased product quality.
Training / Education

AS13004 Process Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (PFMEA) and Control Plans

2021-05-18
In the Aerospace Industry there is a growing focus on Defect Prevention to ensure that quality goals are met. Process Failure Mode & Effects Analysis (PFMEA) and Control Plan activities described in AS13004 are recognized as being one of the most effective, on the journey to Zero Defects. This two-day course is designed to explain the core tools of Process Flow Diagrams, Process Failure Mode & Effects Analysis (PFMEA) and Control Plans as described in AS13004. It will show the links to other quality tools such as Design FMEA, Characteristics Matrix and Measurement Systems Analysis (MSA).
Training / Education

PFMEA and the Control Plan - Overview and Application

The Process FMEA and Control Plan program introduces the basic concepts behind this important tool and provides training in how to conduct an effective PFMEA. First, the course explains what a PFMEA is and how it improves the long-term performance of your products, services and related processes by addressing process related failures. The role of the PFMEA in the overall framework of Quality Management System Requirements is explained as well as the role of the PFMEA in the Advanced Product Quality Planning (APQP) process. Additionally, the differences and relationships between the DFMEA and PFMEA are well defined.
Standard

Guidelines for the Development of Architectures for Integrated Vehicle Health Management Systems

2013-12-19
WIP
ARP6290
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) provides best practices and guidance for creating an architecture for integrated vehicle health management systems. Where possible, this document will also provide references to tools to conduct architectural trades. Finally, this document will provide use cases to expose considerations and stakeholders to be included in these trades and utilization of an IVHM system (which may lead to new functional or non-functional requirements).
Book

Numbering System for Standard Drills, Standard Taps, and Reamers

1991-04-01
This hands-on manual provides a systematic method for identifying standard drills, standard taps, and various types of hand, machine and shell reamers used in industrial applications. Complete contents include: J2122 - Numbering System for Standard Drills; J2123 - Numbering System for Standard Taps; and J2124 - Numbering System for Reamers. A complete appendix section listing numerous examples of standard tool designations using the numbering scheme is also included. A valuable reference that will help OEMs and suppliers effectively communicate tool descriptions, as well as more efficiently catalog and supply tools!
Standard

Propulsion System Monitoring for Continued Airworthiness

2020-04-24
WIP
ARP6835
The SAE E-32 Committee is requested to develop standards for Commercial Aircraft Engine Monitoring to support the Continued Airworthiness of aircraft in general, with particular emphasis on the ETOPS (Extended Operations) to support the regulations. 14CFR A33.3 (c) ETOPS Requirements. For an applicant seeking eligibility for an engine to be installed on an airplane approved for ETOPS, the Instructions for Continued Airworthiness must include procedures for engine condition monitoring. The engine condition monitoring procedures must be able to determine prior to flight, whether an engine is capable of providing, within approved engine operating limits, maximum continuous power or thrust, bleed air, and power extraction required for a relevant engine inoperative diversion. For an engine to be installed on a two-engine airplane approved for ETOPS, the engine condition monitoring procedures must be validated before ETOPS eligibility is granted.
Technical Paper

The Use of Trailers with Motor-Trucks

1932-01-01
320001
TRAILER registration figures for the entire United States are given to show the rapid increase in the use of trailers in the last seven years, and, for comparison, State registrations of all motor-vehicles in 1931 are given. To account for the relatively more rapid increase in trailers than in trucks, factors favoring the use of trailers are mentioned and illustrative examples of operation are briefly described. The factor of first importance is legislation, which in general is stated to have promoted the use of trailers to distribute the weight of heavy loads over more axles and wheels; but in some States the laws and regulations have a serious adverse effect. Next to legislation, savings in hauling costs through the use of trailers account for the increase in their numbers, and comparative figures of the cost of hauling per 100 lb. per 100 miles by truck, by truck and trailer and by rail are given to show the economy.
Technical Paper

ECONOMICS OF TOOLING FOR INTERCHANGEABLE PRODUCTION1

1924-01-01
240051
When the volume and the variety of the parts produced by a plant increase beyond the point at which the shop mechanic is capable of devising the methods and building the tools for accomplishing the desired results, it becomes necessary to make a division of labor, and a special department on tool division is needed to determine the proper sequence of operations and the suitable equipment to produce the required quantity with the required degree of accuracy. It is necessary that the men be informed regarding the daily and the ultimate numbers of parts to be produced and the tolerances that will be allowed. The foremost consideration of the production engineer should be economy of production. In this phase of tool engineering, the ultimate number of parts to be produced plays an important role and equipment should be selected that will give the maximum production. All known methods of production should be compared and the most economical one chosen.
Technical Paper

EYE-BOLT STRESSES AS DETERMINED BY PHOTOELASTIC TEST

1925-01-01
250068
Principal stresses in one type of eye-bolt have been determined in the laboratory of photoelasticity at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology by the photoelastic method. In the test, an eye-bolt, designed in accordance with a method suggested for circular eyes in a course in machine design by the Institute, was made of celluloid 0.25 in. thick, 1 in. wide on either side of the eye, with a 1.405-in. diameter of eye, and a 1.333-in. width of shank. Steel loading-plates were pinned to the broadened end of the shank and a load of 100 lb. was suspended from the bolt, which gave a mean stress of 300 lb. per sq. in. in the shank. Plain polarized light was passed through the celluloid model and the isoclinic lines, or lines of equal inclination of principal stress, were observed and recorded. Two families of lines of principal stress, designated as P and Q stresses, were determined graphically from these isoclinic lines.
Technical Paper

MANUFACTURE OR ASSEMBLY OF PARTS

1916-01-01
160038
The question as to whether a part should be made or bought is one that must be settled by the individual maker according to the value of his product, the nature of the part, his capital available for manufacturing purposes and the price at which his product is sold. The author describes the practice followed by some of the large companies, showing that in spite of their being quantity producers, they have found it desirable to buy a number of important parts. Certain parts are rarely made by automobile manufacturers, either because they can be bought more cheaply or because the machinery to produce them is intricate. The author sums up the problem by stating that a manufacturer makes the unit on account of not getting deliveries or because he does not get a fair price from the parts maker or an article good enough to satisfy his conditions. In order to give individuality to the product, the car maker often produces certain parts, such as the engine, himself.
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