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Book

Electronic Transmission Controls

2000-06-10
The evolution of the automotive transmission has changed rapidly in the last decade, partly due to the advantages of highly sophisticated electronic controls. This evolution has resulted in modern automatic transmissions that offer more control, stability, and convenience to the driver. Electronic Transmission Controls contains 68 technical papers from SAE and other international organizations written since 1995 on this rapidly growing area of automotive electronics. This book breaks down the topic into two sections. The section on Stepped Transmissions covers recent developments in regular and 4-wheel drive transmissions from major auto manufacturers including DaimlerChrysler, General Motors, Toyota, Honda, and Ford. Technology covered in this section includes: smooth shift control; automatic transmission efficiency; mechatronic systems; fuel saving technologies; shift control using information from vehicle navigation systems; and fuzzy logic control.
Book

Concepts in Turbocharging for Improved Efficiency and Emissions Reduction

2014-09-22
Legislative requirements to reduce CO2 emissions by 2020 have resulted in significant efforts by car manufacturers to explore various methods of pollution abatement. One of the most effective ways found so far is by shortening the cylinder stroke and downsizing the engine. This new engine then needs to be boosted, or turbocharged, to create the full and original load torque. Turbocharging has been and will continue to be a key component to the new technologies that will make a positive difference in the next-generation engines of years to come. Concepts in Turbocharging for Improved Efficiency and Emissions Reduction explores the many ways that turbocharging will deliver concrete results in meeting the new realities of sustainable, green transportation.
Standard

Physical and Chemical Properties of Engine Oils

2006-11-06
HISTORICAL
J357_200611
This SAE Information Report reviews the various physical and chemical properties of engine oils and provides references to test methods and standards used to measure these properties. It also includes general references on the subject of engine oils, base stocks, and additives.
Standard

Physical and Chemical Properties of Engine Oils

2016-01-19
CURRENT
J357_201601
This SAE Information Report reviews the various physical and chemical properties of engine oils and provides references to test methods and standards used to measure these properties. It also includes general references on the subject of engine oils, base stocks, and additives.
Standard

Carbon and Alloy Steels

1997-09-01
HISTORICAL
J411_199709
This SAE Information Report describes the processing and fabrication of carbon and alloy steels. The basic steelmaking process including iron ore reduction, the uses of fluxes, and the various melting furnaces are briefly described. The various types of steels: killed, rimmed, semikilled, and capped are described in terms of their melting and microstructural differences and their end product use. This document also provides a list of the commonly specified elements used to alloy elemental iron into steel. Each element’s structural benefits and effects are also included. A list of the AISI Steel Products Manuals is included and describes the various finished shapes in which steel is produced.
Standard

Carbon and Alloy Steels

2015-01-23
CURRENT
J411_201501
This SAE Information Report describes the processing and fabrication of carbon and alloy steels. The basic steelmaking process including iron ore reduction, the uses of fluxes, and the various melting furnaces are briefly described. The various types of steels: killed, rimmed, semikilled, and capped are described in terms of their melting and microstructural differences and their end product use. This document also provides a list of the commonly specified elements used to alloy elemental iron into steel. Each element’s structural benefits and effects are also included. A list of the AISI Steel Products Manuals is included and describes the various finished shapes in which steel is produced.
Standard

Electric Vehicle (E-Vehicle) Crash Test Lab Safety Guidelines

2015-12-17
CURRENT
J3040_201512
The special risks associated with conducting crash tests on E-Vehicles can be divided into two main categories; 1) thermal activity inside the battery (resulting from electrical or mechanical abuse) may lead to energetic emission of harmful and/or flammable gases, thermal runaway, and potentially fire, and 2) the risk of electrocution. Procedures to ensure protection from all types of risk must be integrated into the entire crash test process. This informational report is intended to provide guidance in this endeavor using current best practices at the time of this publication. As both battery technology and battery management system technology is in a phase of expansion, the contents of this report must then be gaged against current technology of the time, and updated periodically to retain its applicability and usefulness.
Standard

Hydraulic Motor Test Procedures

2009-06-12
CURRENT
J746_200906
This test code describes tests for determining characteristics of hydraulic positive displacement motors as used on construction and industrial machinery as referenced in SAE J1116. These characteristics are to be recorded on data sheets similar to the one shown in Figure 1. Two sets of data sheets are to be submitted: one at 49 °C (120 °F) and one at 82 °C (180 °F).
Standard

High Temperature Materials for Exhaust Manifolds

1999-08-01
HISTORICAL
J2515_199908
A subcommittee within SAE ISTC Division 35 has written this report to provide automotive engineers and designers a basic understanding of the design considerations and high temperature material availability for exhaust manifold use. It is hoped that it will constitute a concise reference of the important characteristics of selected cast and wrought ferrous materials available for this application, as well as methods employed for manufacturing. The different types of manifolds used in current engine designs are discussed, along with their range of applicability. Finally, a general description of mechanical, chemical, and thermophysical properties of commonly-used alloys is provided, along with discussions on the importance of such properties.
Standard

Instrumentation and Techniques for Exhaust Gas Emissions Measurement

2011-06-10
CURRENT
J254_201106
This SAE Recommended Practice establishes uniform laboratory techniques for the continuous and bag-sample measurement of various constituents in the exhaust gas of the gasoline engines installed in passenger cars and light-duty trucks. The report concentrates on the measurement of the following components in exhaust gas: hydrocarbons (HC), carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), oxygen (O2), and nitrogen oxides (NOx). NOx is the sum of nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2). A complete procedure for testing vehicles may be found in SAE J1094. This document includes the following sections: 1. Scope 2. References 3. Emissions Sampling Systems 4. Emissions Analyzers 5. Data Analysis 6. Associated Test Equipment 7. Test Procedures
Standard

Multiposition Small Engine Exhaust System Fire Ignition Suppression

2012-10-23
CURRENT
J335_201210
This SAE Recommended Practice establishes equipment and test procedures for determining the performance of spark arrester exhaust systems of multiposition small engines (<19 kW) used in portable applications, including hand-held, hand-guided, and backpack mounted devices. It is not applicable to spark arresters used in vehicles or stationary equipment.
Standard

Life Cycle Analysis to Estimate the CO2-Equivalent Emissions from MAC Operation

2009-02-16
CURRENT
J2766_200902
This recommended best practice outlines a method for estimating CO2-Equivalent emissions using the GREEN-MAC-LCCP© (Global Refrigerants Energy and ENvironmental – Mobile Air Conditioning – Life Cycle Climate Performance) model (also referred to as “the model” in this standard).
Standard

Self-Propelled Sweepers and Scrubbers Fuel Consumption of Non-Propulsion Auxiliary Engines

2007-11-15
HISTORICAL
J2542_200711
This SAE Standard applies to the fuel consumption of non-propulsion engines used to drive exclusively the sweeping and cleaning functions of multi-engine sweepers and scrubbers as defined in SAE J2130. The purpose of this document is to derive a uniform expression of fuel consumption from a simulated test cycle. The derived expression is based on various work situations encountered during a typical daily eight-hour period of operation. The derived fuel consumption may be used to assess the sizing of fuel tanks.
Standard

Self-Propelled Sweepers and Scrubbers Fuel Consumption of Non-Propulsion Auxiliary Engines

2001-05-14
HISTORICAL
J2542_200105
This SAE Standard applies to the fuel consumption of non-propulsion engines used to drive exclusively the sweeping and cleaning functions of multi-engine sweepers and scrubbers as defined in SAE J2130. The purpose of this document is to derive a uniform expression of fuel consumption from a simulated test cycle. The derived expression is based on various work situations encountered during a typical daily eight-hour period of operation. The derived fuel consumption may be used to assess the sizing of fuel tanks.
Standard

Diesel Fuels

2004-07-28
HISTORICAL
J313_200407
Automotive and railroad diesel fuels, in general, are derived from petroleum refinery products which are commonly referred to as middle distillates. Middle distillates represent products which have a higher boiling range than gasoline and are obtained from fractional distillation of the crude oil or from streams from other refining processes. Finished diesel fuels represent blends of middle distillates. The properties of commercial distillate diesel fuels depend on the refinery practices employed and the nature of the crude oils from which they are derived. Thus, they may differ both with and within the region in which they are manufactured. Such fuels generally boil over a range between 163 and 371 °C (325 to 700 °F). Their makeup can represent various combinations of volatility, ignition quality, viscosity, sulfur level, gravity, and other characteristics. Additives may be used to impart special properties to the finished diesel fuel.
Standard

Diesel Fuels

2017-06-07
CURRENT
J313_201706
Automotive and locomotive diesel fuels, in general, are derived from petroleum refinery products which are commonly referred to as middle distillates. Middle distillates represent products which have a higher boiling range than gasoline and are obtained from fractional distillation of the crude oil or from streams from other refining processes. Finished diesel fuels represent blends of middle distillates and may contain other blending components of substantially non-petroleum origin, such as biodiesel fuel blend stock, and/or middle distillates from non-traditional refining processes, such as gas-to-liquid processes. The properties of commercial distillate diesel fuels depend on the refinery practices employed and the nature of the crude oils from which they are derived. Thus, they may differ both with and within the region in which they are manufactured. Such fuels generally boil, at atmospheric pressure, over a range between 130 °C and 400 °C (approximately 270 °F to 750 °F).
Standard

Recommended Practice for Testing Performance of PEM Fuel Cell Stack Sub-system for Automotive Applications

2011-08-12
CURRENT
J2617_201108
This recommended practice is intended to serve as a procedure to verify the functional performance, design specifications or vendor claims of any PEM (Proton Exchange Membrane) type fuel cell stack sub-system for automotive applications. In this document, definitions, specifications, and methods for the functional performance characterization of the fuel cell stack sub-system are provided. The functional performance characterization includes evaluating electrical outputs and controlling fluid inputs and outputs based on the test boundary defined in this document. In this document, a fuel cell stack sub-system is defined to include the following: Fuel cell stack(s) – An assembly of membrane electrode assemblies (MEA), current collectors, separator plates, cooling plates, manifolds, and a supporting structure. Connections for conducting fuels, oxidants, cooling media, inert gases and exhausts. Electrical connections for the power delivered by the stack sub-system.
Video

Neural Network-based Optimal Control for Advanced Vehicular Thermal Management Systems

2011-12-05
Advanced vehicular thermal management system can improve engine performance, minimize fuel consumption, and reduce emissions by harmoniously operating computer-controlled servomotor components. In this paper, a neural network-based optimal control strategy is proposed to regulate the engine temperature through the advanced cooling system. Presenter Asma Al Tamimi, Hashemite University
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