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Standard

AIR CONDITIONING OF SUBSONIC AIRCRAFT AT HIGH ALTITUDE

1984-03-01
CURRENT
AIR795A
This report is limited to the special problems of air quantity, purity, movement, pressure, temperature, and humidity which arise from the requirements of the human body during high altitude flight, together with the associated aircraft design problems.
Standard

AIRCRAFT HUMIDIFICATION

1982-04-30
HISTORICAL
AIR1609
This report covers the design parameters for various methods of humidification applicable to aircraft, the physiological aspects of low humidities, the possible benefits of controlling cabin humidity, the penalties associated with humidification, and the problems which must be solved for practical aircraft humidification systems. The design information is applicable to commercial and military aircraft. The physiological aspects cover all aircraft environmental control applications.
Standard

Aircraft Humidification

2005-03-21
CURRENT
AIR1609A
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) covers the design parameters for various methods of humidification applicable to aircraft, the physiological aspects of low humidities, the possible benefits of controlling cabin humidity, the penalties associated with humidification, and the problems which must be solved for practical aircraft humidification systems. The design information is applicable to commercial and military aircraft. The physiological aspects cover all aircraft environmental control applications.
Standard

ANIMAL ENVIRONMENT IN CARGO COMPARTMENTS

1985-10-01
HISTORICAL
AIR1600
The environmental factors of prime importance in the transport of animals in aircraft are air temperature, humidity and carbon dioxide concentration, and of course space (or volume) limitations. Secondary factors are air velocity, noise, lighting, etc. Pressure is not addressed herein as pressure levels and rates of change are totally dictated by human occupancy requirements. Some basic governmental documents, such as References 1, 2 and 3, define overall requirements for animal transportation, but with very limited data on environmental requirements. Reference 4 gives some airplane characteristics measured during animal transportation from the USA to foreign destinations. Temperature and humidity profiles are indicative of airplane characteristics. This report presents information on the temperature, humidity, ventilation, and carbon dioxide limitations and the metabolic heat release rates for animals which will allow the determination of the environment required by the animals.
Standard

Animal Environment in Cargo Compartments

1997-10-01
CURRENT
AIR1600A
The environmental factors of prime importance in the transport of animals in aircraft are air temperature, humidity and carbon dioxide concentration, and of course space (or volume) limitations. Secondary factors are air velocity, noise, lighting, etc. Pressure is not addressed herein as pressure levels and rates of change are totally dictated by human occupancy requirements. Some basic governmental documents, such as References 1, 2 and 3, define overall requirements for animal transportation, but with very limited data on environmental requirements. Reference 4 gives some airplane characteristics measured during animal transportation from the USA to foreign destinations. Temperature and humidity profiles are indicative of airplane characteristics. This report presents information on the temperature, humidity, ventilation, and carbon dioxide limitations and the metabolic heat release rates for animals which will allow the determination of the environment required by the animals.
Standard

Heat and Mass Transfer and Air-Water Mixtures

2001-08-01
HISTORICAL
AIR1168/2
Heat transfer is the transport of thermal energy from one point to another. Heat is transferred only under the influence of a temperature gradient or temperature difference. The direction of heat transfer is always from the point at the higher temperature to the point at the lower temperature, in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics. The fundamental modes of heat transfer are conduction, convection, and radiation. Conduction is the net transfer of energy within a fluid or solid occurring by the collisions of molecules, atoms, or electrons. Convection is the transfer of energy resulting from fluid motion. Convection involves the processes of conduction, fluid motion, and mass transfer. Radiation is the transfer of energy from one point to another in the absence of a transporting medium. In practical applications several modes of heat transfer occur simultaneously.
Standard

Heat and Mass Transfer and Air-Water Mixtures

2011-07-25
CURRENT
AIR1168/2A
Heat transfer is the transport of thermal energy from one point to another. Heat is transferred only under the influence of a temperature gradient or temperature difference. The direction of heat transfer is always from the point at the higher temperature to the point at the lower temperature, in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics. The fundamental modes of heat transfer are conduction, convection, and radiation. Conduction is the net transfer of energy within a fluid or solid occurring by the collisions of molecules, atoms, or electrons. Convection is the transfer of energy resulting from fluid motion. Convection involves the processes of conduction, fluid motion, and mass transfer. Radiation is the transfer of energy from one point to another in the absence of a transporting medium. In practical applications several modes of heat transfer occur simultaneously.
Standard

The Control of Excess Humidity in Avionics Cooling

1997-10-01
HISTORICAL
ARP987A
The purpose of this document is threefold: (1) to review the problem of moisture in avionics equipment, (2) to outline methods for correcting conditions of excess moisture in existing avionics installations, and (3) to recommend design practices for new avionics cooling system installations which will minimize the adverse effects of moisture.
Standard

The Control of Excess Humidity in Avionics Cooling

2010-06-17
CURRENT
ARP987B
This Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) outlines the causes and impacts of moisture and/or condensation in avionics equipment and provides recommendations for corrective and preventative action.
Standard

TEMPERATURE CONTROL EQUIPMENT, AUTOMATIC, AIRPLANE CABIN

1956-03-15
HISTORICAL
ARP89B
This recommended practice covers automatic cabin temperature control systems of the following types for pressurized and unpressurized cabins: Type I - Proportioning. Type II - On-Off, or Cycling. Type III - Floating, including modifications thereof.
Standard

Guide for Qualification Testing of Aircraft Air Valves

1997-03-01
HISTORICAL
ARP986C
This Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) defines tests to be performed on hydraulically, electrically, pneumatically, and mechanically actuated air valves. They may be further defined as those valves that function in response to externally applied forces or in response to variations in upstream and/or downstream duct air conditions in order to maintain a calibrated duct air condition (e.g., air flow, air pressure, air temperature, air pressure ratio, or air shutoff).
Standard

GUIDE FOR QUALIFICATION TESTING OF AIRCRAFT AIR VALVES

1990-02-28
HISTORICAL
ARP986B
This Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) defines tests to be performed on hydraulically, electrically, pneumatically, and mechanically actuated air valves. They may be further defined as those valves that function in response to externally applied forces or in response to variations in upstream and/or downstream duct air conditions in order to maintain a calibrated duct air condition (e.g., air flow, air pressure, air temperature, air pressure ratio, or air shutoff).
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