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AIRCRAFT ELECTRICAL HEATING SYSTEMS

1965-01-10
HISTORICAL
AIR860
It is intended that the scope of this information report be limited to electrical heating of passenger, crew, and cargo compartments only.
Standard

Aircraft Electrical Heating Systems

2000-06-01
HISTORICAL
AIR860A
It is intended that the scope of this information report be limited to electrical heating of passenger, crew, and cargo compartments only. No attempt has been made to develop the complete electrical circuitry associated with the electrical heating components; however, the electrical circuitry required for heating component operation, safety, and monitoring will be included as available. Specific design information is given for various modern aircraft utilizing electrical heating. Each aircraft discussed will be identified by alphabetical letter designation and included in the appropriate appendix.
Standard

Aircraft Electrical Heating Systems

2011-10-17
CURRENT
AIR860B
It is intended that the scope of this information report be limited to electrical heating of passenger, crew, and cargo compartments only. No attempt has been made to develop the complete electrical circuitry associated with the electrical heating components; however, the electrical circuitry required for heating component operation, safety, and monitoring will be included as available. Specific design information is given for various modern aircraft utilizing electrical heating. Each aircraft discussed will be identified by alphabetical letter designation and included in the appropriate appendix.
Standard

Environmental Control for Civil Supersonic Transport

1994-12-01
HISTORICAL
AIR746B
This document supplements ARP85, to extend its use in the design of ECS for supersonic transports. The ECS provides an environment controlled within specified operational limits of comfort and safety, for humans, animals, and equipment. These limits include pressure, temperature, humidity, conditioned air velocity, ventilation rate, thermal radiation, wall temperature, audible noise, vibration, and composition (ozone, contaminants, etc.) of the environment. The ECS is comprised of equipment, controls, and indicators that supply and distribute conditioned air to the occupied compartments. This system is defined within the ATA 100 specification, Chapter 21. It interfaces with the pneumatic system (Chapter 36 of ATA 100), at the inlet of the air conditioning system shutoff valves.
Standard

Environmental Control for Civil Supersonic Transport

2011-08-10
CURRENT
AIR746C
This document supplements ARP85, to extend its use in the design of ECS for supersonic transports. The ECS provides an environment controlled within specified operational limits of comfort and safety, for humans, animals, and equipment. These limits include pressure, temperature, humidity, conditioned air velocity, ventilation rate, thermal radiation, wall temperature, audible noise, vibration, and composition (ozone, contaminants, etc.) of the environment. The ECS is comprised of equipment, controls, and indicators that supply and distribute conditioned air to the occupied compartments. This system is defined within the ATA 100 specification, Chapter 21. It interfaces with the pneumatic system (Chapter 36 of ATA 100), at the inlet of the air conditioning system shutoff valves.
Standard

Fault Isolation in Environmental Control Systems of Commercial Transports

1993-11-01
CURRENT
AIR1266A
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) outlines concepts for the design and use of fault isolation equipment that have general application. The specific focus is on fault isolation of environmental control systems (ECS) in commercial transports. Presented are general fault isolation purposes, design principles, and demonstration of compliance criteria. These are followed by three design examples to aid in understanding the design principles. Future trends in built-in-test-equipment (BITE) design are discussed, some of which represent concepts already being implemented on new equipment.
Standard

SAE Aerospace Applied Thermodynamics Manual

1992-09-01
CURRENT
AIR1168/V1
The SAE Aerospace Applied Thermodynamics Manual has long been the industry reference on thermodynamics,aerodynamics, heat transfer, fluid dynamics, and materials properties. Reflecting over 1,000 corrections from the previous version, the third edition of this valuable manual is composed of 14 individual paperbound Aerospace Information Reports that are shrinkwrapped as a set.
Standard

Characteristics of Equipment Components, Equipment Cooling System Design, and Temperature Control System Design

1993-04-01
HISTORICAL
AIR1168/6
This section relates the engineering fundamentals and thermophysical property material of the previous sections to the airborne equipment for which thermodynamic considerations apply. For each generic classification of equipment, information is presented for the types of equipment included in these categories, and the thermodynamic design considerations with respect to performance, sizing, and selection of this equipment.
Standard

Characteristics of Equipment Components, Equipment Cooling System Design, and Temperature Control System Design

2011-07-25
CURRENT
AIR1168/6A
This section relates the engineering fundamentals and thermophysical property material of the previous sections to the airborne equipment for which thermodynamic considerations apply. For each generic classification of equipment, information is presented for the types of equipment included in these categories, and the thermodynamic design considerations with respect to performance, sizing, and selection of this equipment.
Standard

Aerothermodynamic Test Instrumentation and Measurement

1990-02-01
HISTORICAL
AIR1168/5
Like the technologies to which it contributes, the science of instrumentation seems to be expanding to unlimited proportions. In considering instrumentation techniques, primary emphasis was given in this section to the fundamentals of pressure, temperature, and flow measurement. Accent was placed on common measurement methods, such as manometers, thermocouples, and head meters, rather than on difficult and specialized techniques. Icing, humidity, velocity, and other special measurements were touched on briefly. Many of the references cited were survey articles or texts containing excellent bibliographies to assist a more detailed study where required.
Standard

Aircraft Fuel Weight Penalty Due to Air Conditioning

1989-09-01
HISTORICAL
AIR1168/8
The purpose of this section is to provide methods and a set of convenient working charts to estimate penalty values in terms of take-off fuel weight for any given airplane mission. The curves are for a range of specific fuel consumption (SFC) and lift/drag ratio (L/D) compatible with the jet engines and supersonic aircraft currently being developed. A typical example showing use of the charts for an air conditioning system is given. Evaluation of the penalty imposed on aircraft performance characteristics by the installation of an air conditioning system is important for two reasons: 1 It provides a common denominator for comparing systems in the preliminary design stage, thus aiding in the choice of system to be used. 2 It aids in pinpointing portions of existing systems where design improvements can be most readily achieved.
Standard

Aerothermodynamic Test Instrumentation and Measurement

2011-07-25
CURRENT
AIR1168/5A
Like the technologies to which it contributes, the science of instrumentation seems to be expanding to unlimited proportions. In considering instrumentation techniques, primary emphasis was given in this section to the fundamentals of pressure, temperature, and flow measurement. Accent was placed on common measurement methods, such as manometers, thermocouples, and head meters, rather than on difficult and specialized techniques. Icing, humidity, velocity, and other special measurements were touched on briefly. Many of the references cited were survey articles or texts containing excellent bibliographies to assist a more detailed study where required.
Standard

Aircraft Fuel Weight Penalty Due to Air Conditioning

2011-07-25
CURRENT
AIR1168/8A
The purpose of this section is to provide methods and a set of convenient working charts to estimate penalty values in terms of take-off fuel weight for any given airplane mission. The curves are for a range of specific fuel consumption (SFC) and lift/drag ratio (L/D) compatible with the jet engines and supersonic aircraft currently being developed. A typical example showing use of the charts for an air conditioning system is given. Evaluation of the penalty imposed on aircraft performance characteristics by the installation of an air conditioning system is important for two reasons: 1 It provides a common denominator for comparing systems in the preliminary design stage, thus aiding in the choice of system to be used. 2 It aids in pinpointing portions of existing systems where design improvements can be most readily achieved.
Standard

Environmental Control Systems Life Cycle Cost

2017-02-07
CURRENT
AIR1812B
This report contains background information on life cycle cost elements and key ECS cost factors. Elements of life cycle costs are defined from initial design phases through operational use. Information on how ECS designs affect overall aircraft cost and information on primary factors affecting ECS costs are discussed. Key steps or efforts for comparing ECS designs on the basis of LCC are outlined. Brief descriptions of two computer programs for estimating LCC of total aircraft programs and their use to estimate ECS LCC, are included.
Standard

Environmental Control Systems Life Cycle Cost

1997-10-01
HISTORICAL
AIR1812A
This report contains background information on life cycle cost elements and key ECS cost factors. Elements of life cycle costs are defined from initial design phases through operational use. Information on how ECS designs affect overall aircraft cost and information on primary factors affecting ECS costs are discussed. Key steps or efforts for comparing ECS designs on the basis of LCC are outlined. Brief descriptions of two computer programs for estimating LCC of total aircraft programs and their use to estimate ECS LCC, are included.
Standard

ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL SYSTEMS LIFE CYCLE COST

1985-10-01
HISTORICAL
AIR1812
This report contains background information on life cycle cost elements and key ECS cost factors. Elements of life cycle costs are defined from initial design phases through operational use. Information on how ECS designs affect overall aircraft cost and information on primary factors affecting ECS costs are discussed. Key steps or efforts for comparing ECS designs on the basis of LCC are outlined. Brief descriptions of two computer programs for estimating LCC of total aircraft programs and their use to estimate ECS LCC, are included.
Standard

ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL SYSTEM TRANSIENT ANALYSIS COMPUTER PROGRAM (EASY)

1994-09-01
HISTORICAL
AIR1823
The Environmental Control Analysis SYstem (EASY) computer program is summarized in this report. Development of this computer program initially was sponsored by the U.S. Air Force Flight Dynamics Laboratory. (See References 1, 2, 3, and 4.) It provides techniques for determination of steady state and dynamic (transient) ECS performance, and of control system stability; and for synthesis of optimal ECS control systems. The program is available from the U.S. Air Force, or as a proprietary commercial version. General uses of a transient analysis computer program for ECS design and development, and general features of EASY relative to these uses, are presented. This report summarizes the nine analysis options of EASY, EASY program organization for analyzing ECS, data input to the program and resulting data output, and a discussion of EASY limitations. Appendices provide general definitions for dynamic analysis, and samples of input and output for EASY.
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