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Training / Education

Introduction to Commercial and Off-Road Vehicle Cooling Airflow Systems

Vehicle functional requirements, emission regulations, and thermal limits all have a direct impact on the design of a powertrain cooling airflow system. Given the expected increase in emission-related heat rejection, suppliers and vehicle manufacturers must work together as partners in the design, selection, and packaging of cooling system components. An understanding and appreciation of airflow integration issues and vehicle-level trade-offs that effect system performance are important to the team effort. The severe duty cycles, minimal ram air, and sometimes unconventional package layouts present unique challenges.
Video

Neural Network-based Optimal Control for Advanced Vehicular Thermal Management Systems

2011-12-05
Advanced vehicular thermal management system can improve engine performance, minimize fuel consumption, and reduce emissions by harmoniously operating computer-controlled servomotor components. In this paper, a neural network-based optimal control strategy is proposed to regulate the engine temperature through the advanced cooling system. Presenter Asma Al Tamimi, Hashemite University
Video

Cooling Airflow System Modeling in CFD Using Assumption of Stationary Flow

2011-11-29
Today CFD is an important tool for engineers in the automotive industry who model and simulate fluid flow. For the complex field of Underhood Thermal Management, CFD has become a very important tool to engineer the cooling airflow process in the engine bay of vehicles. Presenter Peter Gullberg, Chalmers University of Technology
Video

Metal Oxide Particle Emissions from Diesel and Petrol Engines

2012-06-18
All internal combustion piston engines emit solid nanoparticles. Some are soot particles resulting from incomplete combustion of fuels, or lube oil. Some particles are metal compounds, most probably metal oxides. A major source of metal compound particles is engine abrasion. The lube oil transports these abraded particles into the combustion zone. There they are partially vaporized and ultrafine oxide particles formed through nucleation [1]. Other sources are the metallic additives to the lube oil, metallic additives in the fuel, and debris from the catalytic coatings in the exhaust-gas emission control devices. The formation process results in extremely fine particles, typically smaller than 50 nm. Thus they intrude through the alveolar membranes directly into the human organism. The consequent health risk necessitates a careful investigation of these emissions and effective curtailment.
Video

Ionic Liquids as Novel Lubricants or Lubricant Additives

2012-05-10
For internal combustion engines and industrial machinery, it is well recognized that the most cost-effective way of reducing energy consumption and extending service life is through lubricant development. This presentation summarizes our recent R&D achievements on developing a new class of candidate lubricants or oil additives ionic liquids (ILs). Features of ILs making them attractive for lubrication include high thermal stability, low vapor pressure, non-flammability, and intrinsic high polarity. When used as neat lubricants, selected ILs demonstrated lower friction under elastohydrodynamic lubrication and less wear at boundary lubrication benchmarked against fully-formulated engine oils in our bench tests. More encouragingly, a group of non-corrosive, oil-miscible ILs has recently been developed and demonstrated multiple additive functionalities including anti-wear and friction modifier when blended into hydrocarbon base oils.
Video

High Speed Machining of CFRP Parts

2012-03-16
High Speed Machining of CFRP Parts Investigation of the influence of new geometries, cutting datas and coolant capabilities on the surface finish of CFRP parts. State of the art: Different CFRP grades and machining conditions make geometry adjustments to the tool necessary. Mechanical failures through machining operations can be avoided in most of the cases. New unidirectional CFRP grades and dry machining processes again lead to machining problems. This study investigates new geometries to avoid heat damage with dry maching and air coolant in case of unidirectional CFRP. With help of a thermo camera and the surface investigation with a scanning electron microscope, heat damage can be analysed and therefore new geometries can be developed and tested. Target is to develop a new multi purpose CFRP geometry to meet the requirements of the future. The reduction of different geometries used leads to major cost savings. Presenter Ingo von Puttkamer, Guhring oHG
Standard

FZG Test Review

2017-02-28
WIP
AIR6919
Over the past several years the FZG A/8.3/90 test method has been used to evaluate current qualified aviation lubricants. The results of the effort have been summarized in this document as a historical reference to document the findings made from the committee.
Standard

Traction Coefficient Measurement

2013-02-12
WIP
ARP6243
Aviation oils provide thin lubricating films between highly stressed bearing, gear and other lubricated contacts. The stresses and shear rates cause rapid rheological changes in the oil which affect the traction (friction) between the surfaces. Thin film dynamic forces are associated with the molecular structure of the oil provided by the oil supplier. Traction force divided by the normal load (i.e. traction coefficient) can be viewed as a fundamental property of aviation oil. Its value is a function of stress, temperature and shear rate. Appropriate measurements are made under dynamic conditions to characterize aviation oil products for engineering design purposes and service performance prediction.
Standard

Acid Assay of Polyol Ester Lubricants

2019-09-11
WIP
ARP6670
This test method describes the procedure for the determination of the composition of the base stock of polyol ester lubricants by gas chromatography mass spectroscopy (GC-MS).
Training / Education

Introduction to Cooling Airflow Systems Web Seminar RePlay

Anytime
Vehicle functional requirements, diesel emission regulations, and subsystem thermal limits all have a direct impact on the design of a powertrain cooling airflow system. Severe duty cycles, minimal ram air, fouling, and sometimes unconventional package layouts present unique challenges to the designer. This course introduces many airflow integration issues and vehicle-level trade-offs that effect system performance and drive the design. The goal of this course is to introduce engineers and managers to the basic principles of diesel cooling airflow systems for commercial and off-road vehicles.
Technical Paper

Installation Effects on the Flow Generated Noise From Automotive Electrical Cooling Fans

2020-09-30
2020-01-1516
With the electrification of road vehicles comes new demands on the cooling system. Not the least when it comes to noise. Less masking from the driveline and new features, as for example, cooling when charging the batteries drives the need for silent cooling fans. In this work a novel e-fan is studied in different generalized installations and operating conditions. The fans (a cluster configuration) are installed in a test rig where the operation could be controlled varying the speed, flow rate and pressure difference over the fan. On the vehicle side of the fan a generalized packaging space (similar to an engine bay for conventional vehicles) is placed. In this packaging space different obstruction can be placed to simulate the components and radiators used in the vehicle. Here generalized simple blocks in different configuration are used to provide well defined and distinct test cases.
Technical Paper

Numerical Investigation of Narrow-Band Noise Generation by Automotive Cooling Fans

2020-09-30
2020-01-1513
Axial cooling fans are commonly used in electric vehicles to cool batteries with high heating load. One drawback of the cooling fans is the high aeroacoustic noise level resulting from the fan blades and the obstacles facing the airflow. To create a comfortable cabin environment in the vehicle, and to reduce exterior noise emission, a low-noise installation design of the axial fan is required. The purpose of the project is to develop an efficient computational aeroacoustics (CAA) simulation process to assist the cooling-fan installation design. This paper reports the current progress of the development, where the narrow-band components of the fan noise is focused on. Two methods are used to compute the noise source. In the first method the source is computed from the flow field obtained using the unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations (unsteady RANS, or URANS) model.
Technical Paper

Reinforcement of Low-Frequency Sound by Using a Panel Speaker Attached to the Roof Panel of a Passenger Car

2020-09-30
2020-01-1570
The woofer in a car should be large to cover the low frequencies, so it is heavy and needs an ample space to be installed in a passenger car. The geometry of the woofer should conform to the limited available space and layout in general. In many cases, the passengers feel that the low-frequency contents are not satisfactory although the speaker specification covers the low frequencies. In this work, a thin panel is installed between the roof liner and the roof panel, and it is used as the woofer. The vibration field is controlled by many small actuators to create the speaker and baffle zones to avoid the sound distortion due to the modal interaction. The generation of speaker and baffle zones follows the inverse vibro-acoustic rendering technique. In the actual implementation, a thin acrylic plate of 0.53ⅹ0.2 m2 is used as the radiator panel, and the control actuator array is composed of 16 moving-coil actuators.
Book

Principles of Engine Cooling Systems, Components and Maintenance

1990-10-01
Completely revised as a result of the significant progress made in cooling system design and maintenance practices and procedures, HS-40 provides current, comprehensive information on the description, function, and maintenance of engine liquid-cooling systems used in light and heavy-duty vehicles. Information-packed chapters discuss the interrelation between the cooling system and other engine systems, cooling system components, general preventive maintenance, and troubleshooting.
Book

SAE International Journals Complete Set

2010-04-30
This set includes: SAE International Journal of Aerospace March 2010 - Volume 2 Issue 1 SAE International Journal of Commercial Vehicles October 2009 - Volume 2, Issue 1 March 2010 - Volume 2, Issue 2 SAE International Journal of Engines October 2009 - Volume 2, Issue 1 March 2010 - Volume 2, Issue 2 SAE International Journal of Fuels and Lubricants October 2009 - Volume 2, Issue 1 March 2010 - Volume 2, Issue 2 SAE International Journal of Materials and Manufacturing October 2009 - Volume 2, Issue 1 March 2010 - Volume 2, Issue 2 SAE International Journal of Passenger Cars - Electronic and Electrical Systems October 2009 - Volume 2, Issue 1 SAE International Journal of Passenger Cars - Mechanical Systems October 2009 - Volume 2, Issue 1 March 2010 - Volume 2, Issue 2
Technical Paper

High-Speed High-Efficiency Engines

1928-01-01
280039
MARKED improvement in high-speed high-efficiency engines will be accomplished during the next few years, according to the author. They will have better balance, longer life and greater efficiency, and will develop more power and be more satisfactory to the motoring public. Details of recent developments in this class of engine are given by the author after remarking that the present trend is toward a large number of small changes in design and construction rather than toward radical departures from former design and methods. Mr. Duesenberg comments upon the main features of design of his 91-cu. in. racing-car engine and its parts, and on the troubles that necessitated design changes. The combustion-chamber is stated to be the most important contributor to high efficiency. If the shape of the combustion-chamber, the area of the valves, and the location of the valves and spark-plugs are not right, all the other refinements of detail are of little value.
Technical Paper

Prevention of Corrosion in Duralumin Airplane Structures

1929-01-01
290066
AT first believed immune, aluminum alloys have been found extremely susceptible to both surface corrosion and intercrystalline corrosion. The latter goes on under paint that has been applied to imperfectly cleaned surfaces, and shows only as blisters. Because of this, it has become commonplace to break with the fingers the ribs and the trailing edges of duralumin lower wings and tail-surfaces. Contact of duralumin with brass or steel hastens corrosion, and protective paint coverings are dissolved by dope where fabric surfaces meet metal parts. All-duralumin structures are not considered suitable for sea-going aircraft unless all joints and seams are of water-tight construction, not only in hulls but in other members of the structure. Corrosion over the land is much less severe. Few manufacturers seem awake to the importance of corrosion. The fight to avoid it should begin with avoiding seams that are difficult to protect and hollow members that cannot be sealed hermetically.
Technical Paper

Specification-Writing for Petroleum Lubricants

1927-01-01
270061
ALL large users of petroleum lubricants are endeavoring to reduce to printed form their individual ideas of what the lubricants they want should contain and what their physical and mechanical properties should be. The lubricants manufacturer finds, however, that anarchy prevails among the requirements and that the technique of writing the specifications is distinctly amateurish. One method followed is to analyze a satisfactory lubricant and embody the results in the specifications, but the specifier does not know that the product is the best for his purpose and does not possess the facilities for accurate analysis and the ability to determine the pertinent from the irrelevant factors. Another method is to select from a number of analyses and specifications items that seem important and incorporate them in the writer's specification. The result calls for a non-existent hybrid that may be impossible to produce.
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