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Standard

Aerothermodynamic Test Instrumentation and Measurement

1990-02-01
HISTORICAL
AIR1168/5
Like the technologies to which it contributes, the science of instrumentation seems to be expanding to unlimited proportions. In considering instrumentation techniques, primary emphasis was given in this section to the fundamentals of pressure, temperature, and flow measurement. Accent was placed on common measurement methods, such as manometers, thermocouples, and head meters, rather than on difficult and specialized techniques. Icing, humidity, velocity, and other special measurements were touched on briefly. Many of the references cited were survey articles or texts containing excellent bibliographies to assist a more detailed study where required.
Standard

Aircraft Fuel Weight Penalty Due to Air Conditioning

1989-09-01
HISTORICAL
AIR1168/8
The purpose of this section is to provide methods and a set of convenient working charts to estimate penalty values in terms of take-off fuel weight for any given airplane mission. The curves are for a range of specific fuel consumption (SFC) and lift/drag ratio (L/D) compatible with the jet engines and supersonic aircraft currently being developed. A typical example showing use of the charts for an air conditioning system is given. Evaluation of the penalty imposed on aircraft performance characteristics by the installation of an air conditioning system is important for two reasons: 1 It provides a common denominator for comparing systems in the preliminary design stage, thus aiding in the choice of system to be used. 2 It aids in pinpointing portions of existing systems where design improvements can be most readily achieved.
Standard

Aerothermodynamic Test Instrumentation and Measurement

2011-07-25
CURRENT
AIR1168/5A
Like the technologies to which it contributes, the science of instrumentation seems to be expanding to unlimited proportions. In considering instrumentation techniques, primary emphasis was given in this section to the fundamentals of pressure, temperature, and flow measurement. Accent was placed on common measurement methods, such as manometers, thermocouples, and head meters, rather than on difficult and specialized techniques. Icing, humidity, velocity, and other special measurements were touched on briefly. Many of the references cited were survey articles or texts containing excellent bibliographies to assist a more detailed study where required.
Standard

Aircraft Fuel Weight Penalty Due to Air Conditioning

2011-07-25
CURRENT
AIR1168/8A
The purpose of this section is to provide methods and a set of convenient working charts to estimate penalty values in terms of take-off fuel weight for any given airplane mission. The curves are for a range of specific fuel consumption (SFC) and lift/drag ratio (L/D) compatible with the jet engines and supersonic aircraft currently being developed. A typical example showing use of the charts for an air conditioning system is given. Evaluation of the penalty imposed on aircraft performance characteristics by the installation of an air conditioning system is important for two reasons: 1 It provides a common denominator for comparing systems in the preliminary design stage, thus aiding in the choice of system to be used. 2 It aids in pinpointing portions of existing systems where design improvements can be most readily achieved.
Standard

Environmental Control Systems Life Cycle Cost

2017-02-07
CURRENT
AIR1812B
This report contains background information on life cycle cost elements and key ECS cost factors. Elements of life cycle costs are defined from initial design phases through operational use. Information on how ECS designs affect overall aircraft cost and information on primary factors affecting ECS costs are discussed. Key steps or efforts for comparing ECS designs on the basis of LCC are outlined. Brief descriptions of two computer programs for estimating LCC of total aircraft programs and their use to estimate ECS LCC, are included.
Standard

Environmental Control Systems Life Cycle Cost

1997-10-01
HISTORICAL
AIR1812A
This report contains background information on life cycle cost elements and key ECS cost factors. Elements of life cycle costs are defined from initial design phases through operational use. Information on how ECS designs affect overall aircraft cost and information on primary factors affecting ECS costs are discussed. Key steps or efforts for comparing ECS designs on the basis of LCC are outlined. Brief descriptions of two computer programs for estimating LCC of total aircraft programs and their use to estimate ECS LCC, are included.
Standard

ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL SYSTEMS LIFE CYCLE COST

1985-10-01
HISTORICAL
AIR1812
This report contains background information on life cycle cost elements and key ECS cost factors. Elements of life cycle costs are defined from initial design phases through operational use. Information on how ECS designs affect overall aircraft cost and information on primary factors affecting ECS costs are discussed. Key steps or efforts for comparing ECS designs on the basis of LCC are outlined. Brief descriptions of two computer programs for estimating LCC of total aircraft programs and their use to estimate ECS LCC, are included.
Standard

Aerospace Vehicle Cryogenic Duct Systems

2011-08-10
CURRENT
ARP735A
This Aerospace Recommended Practice outlines the design, installation, testing and field maintenance criteria for aerospace vehicle cryogenic duct systems. These recommendations are considered currently applicable guides and are subject to revision due to the continuing development within industry.
Standard

Thermodynamics of Incompressible and Compressible Fluid Flow

1989-03-01
CURRENT
AIR1168/1
The fluid flow treated in this section is isothermal, subsonic, and incompressible. The effects of heat addition, work on the fluid, variation in sonic velocity, and changes in elevation are neglected. An incompressible fluid is one in which a change in pressure causes no resulting change in fluid density. The assumption that liquids are incompressible introduces no appreciable error in calculations, but the assumption that a gas is incompressible introduces an error of a magnitude that is dependent on the fluid velocity and on the loss coefficient of the particular duct section or piece of equipment. Fig. 1A-1 shows the error in pressure drop resulting from assuming that air is incompressible. With reasonably small loss coefficients and the accuracy that is usually required in most calculations, compressible fluids may be treated as incompressible for velocities less than Mach 0.2.
Standard

Air Quality for Commercial Aircraft Cabin Particulate Contaminants

2018-10-17
WIP
AIR4766/1A
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) covers airbone particulate contaminants that may be present in commercial aircraft cabin air during operation. Discussions cover sources of contaminants, methods of control and design recommendations. Air quality, ventilation requirements and standards are also discussed.
Standard

Air Quality for Commercial Aircraft Cabin Particulate Contaminants

2005-02-18
CURRENT
AIR4766/1
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) covers airbone particulate contaminants that may be present in commercial aircraft cabin air during operation. Discussions cover sources of contaminants, methods of control and design recommendations. Air quality, ventilation requirements and standards are also discussed.
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