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Book

Electronic Transmission Controls

2000-06-10
The evolution of the automotive transmission has changed rapidly in the last decade, partly due to the advantages of highly sophisticated electronic controls. This evolution has resulted in modern automatic transmissions that offer more control, stability, and convenience to the driver. Electronic Transmission Controls contains 68 technical papers from SAE and other international organizations written since 1995 on this rapidly growing area of automotive electronics. This book breaks down the topic into two sections. The section on Stepped Transmissions covers recent developments in regular and 4-wheel drive transmissions from major auto manufacturers including DaimlerChrysler, General Motors, Toyota, Honda, and Ford. Technology covered in this section includes: smooth shift control; automatic transmission efficiency; mechatronic systems; fuel saving technologies; shift control using information from vehicle navigation systems; and fuzzy logic control.
Book

Concepts in Turbocharging for Improved Efficiency and Emissions Reduction

2014-09-22
Legislative requirements to reduce CO2 emissions by 2020 have resulted in significant efforts by car manufacturers to explore various methods of pollution abatement. One of the most effective ways found so far is by shortening the cylinder stroke and downsizing the engine. This new engine then needs to be boosted, or turbocharged, to create the full and original load torque. Turbocharging has been and will continue to be a key component to the new technologies that will make a positive difference in the next-generation engines of years to come. Concepts in Turbocharging for Improved Efficiency and Emissions Reduction explores the many ways that turbocharging will deliver concrete results in meeting the new realities of sustainable, green transportation.
Standard

Hydraulic Motor Test Procedures

2009-06-12
CURRENT
J746_200906
This test code describes tests for determining characteristics of hydraulic positive displacement motors as used on construction and industrial machinery as referenced in SAE J1116. These characteristics are to be recorded on data sheets similar to the one shown in Figure 1. Two sets of data sheets are to be submitted: one at 49 °C (120 °F) and one at 82 °C (180 °F).
Book

Vehicle Manufacturers in the Race for Environmental Success

2008-12-01
This ground-breaking new report from ABOUT Automotive assesses to what extent the automotive industry has started to clean up its act, and reduce its environmental impact. The report tackles two clear problems; the damage we are causing to the planet (climate change), and the fact that we, as a society, are dependent on a finite resource (peak oil). The report also assesses the industry’s response to the answer to these two problems – a reduction in energy use and a switch to sustainable renewable energy sources. Central to this new research is the exclusive “Green ranking.” The 12 leading vehicle manufacturers are individually assessed, and ranked according to a variety of criteria – using examples of best practice as benchmarks. The vehicle manufacturers covered are: • BMW • Daimler • Fiat • Ford • GM • Honda • Hyundai • Nissan • PSA • Renault • Toyota • Volkswagen The activities, attitudes and strategies of the 12 vehicle manufacturers are also charted.
Book

Emissions and Air Quality

1999-06-09
This book evaluates the current worldwide state of knowledge about the interrelationship between emissions and air quality. This study describes the contribution of passenger car and commercial vehicle traffic to local and global emission situations, and the consequences for the environment.
Standard

Multiposition Small Engine Exhaust System Fire Ignition Suppression

2012-10-23
CURRENT
J335_201210
This SAE Recommended Practice establishes equipment and test procedures for determining the performance of spark arrester exhaust systems of multiposition small engines (<19 kW) used in portable applications, including hand-held, hand-guided, and backpack mounted devices. It is not applicable to spark arresters used in vehicles or stationary equipment.
Standard

Self-Propelled Sweepers and Scrubbers Fuel Consumption of Non-Propulsion Auxiliary Engines

2007-11-15
HISTORICAL
J2542_200711
This SAE Standard applies to the fuel consumption of non-propulsion engines used to drive exclusively the sweeping and cleaning functions of multi-engine sweepers and scrubbers as defined in SAE J2130. The purpose of this document is to derive a uniform expression of fuel consumption from a simulated test cycle. The derived expression is based on various work situations encountered during a typical daily eight-hour period of operation. The derived fuel consumption may be used to assess the sizing of fuel tanks.
Standard

Self-Propelled Sweepers and Scrubbers Fuel Consumption of Non-Propulsion Auxiliary Engines

2001-05-14
HISTORICAL
J2542_200105
This SAE Standard applies to the fuel consumption of non-propulsion engines used to drive exclusively the sweeping and cleaning functions of multi-engine sweepers and scrubbers as defined in SAE J2130. The purpose of this document is to derive a uniform expression of fuel consumption from a simulated test cycle. The derived expression is based on various work situations encountered during a typical daily eight-hour period of operation. The derived fuel consumption may be used to assess the sizing of fuel tanks.
Collection

High Efficiency IC Engines Concepts, 2014

2014-04-01
This technical paper collection focuses on technologies such as advanced and partially mixed combustion, cooled EGR boosting, ignition and direct injection technologies, pressure boosting, intelligent combustion, thermal efficiency, fully variable valvetrains, and other new and developing technologies.
Collection

Energy Efficiency of Thermal Systems, 2014

2014-04-01
Proper thermal management can significantly contribute to overall system energy efficiency. This technical paper collection highlights the latest developments in thermal management energy efficiency.
Standard

Bluetooth™ Wireless Protocol for Automotive Applications

2001-12-31
HISTORICAL
J2561_200112
This SAE Information Report defines the functionality of typical Bluetooth applications used for remotely accessing in-vehicle automotive installations of electronic devices. Remote access may be achieved directly with on-board Bluetooth modules, or indirectly via a custom designed gateway that communicates with Bluetooth and non-Bluetooth modules alike. Access to the vehicle, in the form of two-way communications, may be made via a single master port, or via multiple ports on the vehicle. The Bluetooth technology may also be used in conjunction with other types of off-board wireless technology. This report recommends using a message strategy that is already defined in one or more of the documents listed in 2.1.1, 2.1.4, 2.1.5, and 2.1.6. Those strategies may be used for some of the typical remote communications with a vehicle. It is recognized, however, that there may be specific applications requiring a unique message strategy or structure.
Standard

Bluetooth™ Wireless Protocol for Automotive Applications

2016-11-08
CURRENT
J2561_201611
This SAE Information Report defines the functionality of typical Bluetooth applications used for remotely accessing in-vehicle automotive installations of electronic devices. Remote access may be achieved directly with on-board Bluetooth modules, or indirectly via a custom designed gateway that communicates with Bluetooth and non-Bluetooth modules alike. Access to the vehicle, in the form of two-way communications, may be made via a single master port, or via multiple ports on the vehicle. The Bluetooth technology may also be used in conjunction with other types of off-board wireless technology. This report recommends using a message strategy that is already defined in one or more of the documents listed in 2.1.1, 2.1.4, 2.1.5, and 2.1.6. Those strategies may be used for some of the typical remote communications with a vehicle. It is recognized, however, that there may be specific applications requiring a unique message strategy or structure.
Standard

Diesel Fuels

2004-07-28
HISTORICAL
J313_200407
Automotive and railroad diesel fuels, in general, are derived from petroleum refinery products which are commonly referred to as middle distillates. Middle distillates represent products which have a higher boiling range than gasoline and are obtained from fractional distillation of the crude oil or from streams from other refining processes. Finished diesel fuels represent blends of middle distillates. The properties of commercial distillate diesel fuels depend on the refinery practices employed and the nature of the crude oils from which they are derived. Thus, they may differ both with and within the region in which they are manufactured. Such fuels generally boil over a range between 163 and 371 °C (325 to 700 °F). Their makeup can represent various combinations of volatility, ignition quality, viscosity, sulfur level, gravity, and other characteristics. Additives may be used to impart special properties to the finished diesel fuel.
Standard

Diesel Fuels

2017-06-07
CURRENT
J313_201706
Automotive and locomotive diesel fuels, in general, are derived from petroleum refinery products which are commonly referred to as middle distillates. Middle distillates represent products which have a higher boiling range than gasoline and are obtained from fractional distillation of the crude oil or from streams from other refining processes. Finished diesel fuels represent blends of middle distillates and may contain other blending components of substantially non-petroleum origin, such as biodiesel fuel blend stock, and/or middle distillates from non-traditional refining processes, such as gas-to-liquid processes. The properties of commercial distillate diesel fuels depend on the refinery practices employed and the nature of the crude oils from which they are derived. Thus, they may differ both with and within the region in which they are manufactured. Such fuels generally boil, at atmospheric pressure, over a range between 130 °C and 400 °C (approximately 270 °F to 750 °F).
Standard

Recommended Practice for Testing Performance of PEM Fuel Cell Stack Sub-system for Automotive Applications

2011-08-12
CURRENT
J2617_201108
This recommended practice is intended to serve as a procedure to verify the functional performance, design specifications or vendor claims of any PEM (Proton Exchange Membrane) type fuel cell stack sub-system for automotive applications. In this document, definitions, specifications, and methods for the functional performance characterization of the fuel cell stack sub-system are provided. The functional performance characterization includes evaluating electrical outputs and controlling fluid inputs and outputs based on the test boundary defined in this document. In this document, a fuel cell stack sub-system is defined to include the following: Fuel cell stack(s) – An assembly of membrane electrode assemblies (MEA), current collectors, separator plates, cooling plates, manifolds, and a supporting structure. Connections for conducting fuels, oxidants, cooling media, inert gases and exhausts. Electrical connections for the power delivered by the stack sub-system.
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