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Technical Paper

Thermodynamical and Mechanical Approach Towards a Variable Valve Train for the Controlled Auto Ignition Combustion Process

2005-04-11
2005-01-0762
Controlled Auto Ignition (CAI) as a promising future combustion process is a concept to strongly reduce fuel consumption as well as NOx emissions. The acceptance and the potential of this combustion process depends on the possible CAI operation range in the engine map and the fuel consumption benefit, as well as the complexity of the variable valve train which is necessary to realize the CAI combustion process. The thermodynamic investigations presented in this paper were done on an engine equipped with an electromechanical valve train (EMVT), featuring Port Fuel Injection (PFI) and direct Injection. They show that the electromechanical valve train is an excellent platform for developing the CAI process. Controlled Auto Ignition has been realized with port fuel injection in a speed range between 1000 and 4500 rpm and in a load range between approximately 1 and 6 bar BMEP (about 5 bar BMEP for pressure gradients lower than 3 bar/°CA) depending on engine speed.
Technical Paper

Type Analysis of EGR-Strategies for Controlled Auto Ignition (CAI) by Using Numerical Simulations and Optical Measurements

2006-04-03
2006-01-0630
The main assignment of Controlled Auto Ignition (CAI) operation range expansion is to reduce the burn rate or combustion noise at high load and to minimize misfire at low load. The potential of two principal EGR strategies is well known to initiate CAI in a wide range of operation map by using a variable train system: the Exhaust Port Recirculation (EPR) for higher part load and the Combustion Chamber Recirculation (CCR - also called Negative Valve Overlap) for lower part load. However the detailed comparison of the ignition phenomena with each EGR strategy has not been fully studied yet. In this paper, EPR and CCR were compared with same operational condition (engine speed and load). For the analysis, flame luminescence and Raman scattering method for optical measurement and STAR-CD (CD-adapco) for numerical simulation are used.
Technical Paper

Controlled Auto Ignition Combustion Process with an Electromechanical Valve Train

2003-03-03
2003-01-0032
The current discussion about possible limitation of CO2 emissions makes improvement of fuel consumption a central topic for gasoline engine development. Various technological solutions are available to realize this improvement. Concepts featuring direct fuel injection, engine downsizing and unthrottled control of engine load with variable valvetrains are currently considered the most promising ways to achieve this goal. Further concepts that are under development include Controlled Auto Ignition (CAI) and homogenous lean burn combustion as well as certain combinations of these technologies. Within the European market, direct injection is currently the most popular solution. The drawback is that a very expensive exhaust gas aftertreatment system is necessary to keep exhaust emissions within legal limits.
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