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Journal Article

Brake Particle Emission Measurements - Testing Method and Results

2017-03-28
2017-01-0996
Brake Particle Emission (BPE) is gaining considerable importance for the friction brake and automotive industry. So far no common approach or legislation for BPE characterization exists although many activities in this field have been started during the last years. Taking this into account, the authors carried out a joint measurement campaign to investigate a new approach regarding the sampling location using a brake dynamometer. During preliminary investigations the influence of the cooling air quality has been examined and a sampling point position validation has been carried out. At first the stabilization behavior for repeated test cycles and variations of volumetric air flow rates are analyzed. As a next step the role of volatile particle emissions is determined. Subsequently, the influence of load history and friction power is studied. Finally results in terms of the role of high temperature applications are presented.
Technical Paper

Collaborative Product Creation Driving the MOST Cooperation

2002-10-21
2002-21-0003
The following document offers insight into the work of the MOST Cooperation. Now that MOST is on the road, a short overview of five years of successful collaborative work of the partners involved and the results achieved will be given. Emphasis is put on the importance of a shared vision in combination with shared values as a prerequisite for targeted collaborative work. It is also about additional key success factors that led to the success of the MOST Cooperation. Your attention will be directed to the way the MOST Cooperation sets and achieves its goals. And you will learn about how the organization was set-up to support a fast progression towards the common goal. The document concludes with examples of recent work as well as an outlook on future work.
Technical Paper

Ridemeter – Calculated Ride Comfort

2007-05-15
2007-01-2388
The ridemeter is a development tool that provides a predictive value for subjectively perceived ride quality on the basis of objective measured values. After years of preliminary investigations it was possible to make the link between the subjective driving experience and objective measured data. Intensive validation of the tool known as the ridemeter enables it to obtain meaningful results, which meet with a high degree of acceptance from the development engineer. The ridemeter is capable of providing calculated assessments for different vehicle concepts on different roads. The ridemeter is used on general road tests, on test runs on the AUDI proving ground, on our test rigs and in simulation. Areas of application include benchmark investigations, optimisation steps for suspension components and systems, and the setting out of limit values and tolerance curves in specifications for future vehicles.
Journal Article

Fast Crank-Angle Based 0D Simulation of Combustion Engine Cold Tests including Manufacturing Faults and Production Spread

2016-04-05
2016-01-1374
During series production of modern combustion engines a major challenge is to ensure the correct operation of every engine part. A common method is to test engines in end-of-line (EOL) cold test stations, where the engines are not fired but tugged by an electric motor. In this work we present a physically based 0D model for dynamic simulation of combustion engines under EOL test conditions. Our goals are the analysis of manufacturing faults regarding their detectability and the enhancement of test procedures under varying environmental conditions. Physical experiments are prohibitive in production environments, and the simulative approach reduces them to a minimum. This model is the first known to the authors exploring advanced engine test methods under production conditions. The model supports a wide range of manufacturing faults (with adjustable magnitude) as well as error-free production spread in engine components.
Journal Article

Adapted Development Process for Security in Networked Automotive Systems

2014-04-01
2014-01-0334
Future automotive systems will be connected with other vehicles and information systems for improved road safety, mobility and comfort. This new connectivity establishes data and command channels between the internal automotive system and arbitrary external entities. One significant issue of this paradigm shift is that formerly closed automotive systems now become open systems that can be maliciously influenced through their communication interfaces. This introduces a new class of security challenges for automotive design. It also indirectly impacts the safety mechanisms that rely on a closed-world assumption for the vehicle. We present a new security analysis approach that helps to identify and prioritize security issues in automotive architectures. The methodology incorporates a new threat classification for data flows in connected vehicle systems.
Journal Article

Development of a Full-Vehicle Hybrid-Simulation Test using Hybrid System Response Convergence (HSRC)

2012-04-16
2012-01-0763
Hybrid vehicle simulation methods combine physical test articles (vehicles, suspensions, etc.) with complementary virtual vehicle components and virtual road and driver inputs to simulate the actual vehicle operating environment. Using appropriate components, hybrid simulation offers the possibility to develop more accurate physical tests earlier, and at lower cost, than possible with conventional test methods. MTS Systems has developed Hybrid System Response Convergence (HSRC), a hybrid simulation method that can utilize existing durability test systems and detailed non-real-time virtual component models to create an accurate full-vehicle simulation test without requiring road load data acquisition. MTS Systems and Audi AG have recently completed a joint evaluation project for the HSRC hybrid simulation method using an MTS 329 road simulator at the Audi facility in Ingolstadt, Germany.
Technical Paper

Studies on Enhanced CVS Technology to Achieve SULEV Certification

2002-03-04
2002-01-0048
For the measurement of exhaust emissions, Constant Volume Sampling (CVS) technology is recommended by legislation and has proven its practical capability in the past. However, the introduction of new low emission standards has raised questions regarding the accuracy and variability of the CVS system when measuring very low emission levels. This paper will show that CVS has the potential to achieve sufficient precision for certification of SULEV concepts. Thus, there is no need for the introduction of new test methods involving high cost. An analysis of the CVS basic equations indicates the importance of the Dilution Factor (DF) for calculating true mass emissions. A test series will demonstrate that, by adjusting the dilution and using state of the art analyzers, the consistency of exhaust results is comparable with those of LEV concepts, measured with conventional CVS systems and former standard analyzers.
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