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Technical Paper

Effect of Icing Environment and Humidity on Reference Air Data Parameters in an Icing Tunnel

2019-06-10
2019-01-1929
Wind tunnel facilities typically rely upon reference instrumentation combined with isentropic flow relationships to define the fluid properties in the test section. For the particular case of icing wind tunnels, the icing environment can affect the airflow such that the definition of test section parameters via isentropic relationships is not strictly correct. These influences are of particular importance for testing air data probes because the nature of the test is to evaluate the performance of a sensor directly measuring the parameters being affected. Momentum, heat, and mass transfer from the water phase to the air phase can result in total temperature and total pressure measurements in the test section that differ from those measured at an upstream station, where reference measurements are typically taken. This effect was first observed by Luers & Fiscus [1] in the context of wind tunnel tests for heavy rain conditions.
Technical Paper

The Cloud Detectability Conundrum

2019-06-10
2019-01-1932
Since the beginning of aviation, aircraft designers, researchers, and pilots have monitored the skies looking for clouds to determine when and where to fly as well as when to deice aircraft surfaces. Seeing a cloud has generally consisted of looking for a white / grey puffy orb floating in the sky, indicating the presence of moisture. A simple monitoring of a temperature gauge or dew point sensor was used to help determine if precipitation was likely or accumulation of ice / snow on the airframe could occur. Various instruments have been introduced over the years to identify the presence of clouds and characterize them for the purposes of air traffic control weather awareness, icing flight test measurements, and production aircraft ice detection. These instruments have included oil slides, illuminated rods, vibrating probes, hot wires, LIDAR, RADAR, and several other measurement techniques.
Technical Paper

Four Years of Testing to AS5562

2019-06-10
2019-01-1957
With the publication of SAE AS5562 in 2015, icing wind tunnel test facilities have upgraded their operating environments and instrumentation to meet the client demand to test to this new standard. Nearing four years of testing and development to this standard, numerous questions and challenges have arisen that industry has addressed on an individual basis but not in a common format for all. This paper addresses some of the known challenges in an effort to apply AS5562 consistently across industry and provide clarity to all users.
Technical Paper

SLD and Ice Crystal Discrimination with the Optical Ice Detector

2019-06-10
2019-01-1934
In response to new safety regulations regarding aircraft icing, Collins Aerospace has developed and tested an Optical Ice Detector (OID) capable of discriminating among icing conditions appropriate to Appendix C and Appendix O of 14 CFR Part 25 and Appendix D of Part 33. The OID is a short-range, polarimetric lidar that samples the airstream up to ten meters beyond the skin of the aircraft. The intensity and extinction of the backscatter light correlate with bulk properties of the cloud, such as water content and phase. Backscatter scintillation (combined with the outside air temperature from another probe) signals the presence of supercooled large droplets (SLD) within the cloud-a capability incorporated into the OID to meet the requirements of Appendix O. Recent laboratory and flight tests of the Optical Ice Detector have confirmed the efficacy of the OID to discriminate among the various icing conditions.
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