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Technical Paper

Cavitation Intensity Measurements for Internal Combustion Engines

1996-02-01
960884
Recent engine design trends towards increasing power, reducing weight, advancing of injection timing and increasing of injection rate and pressure could result in increased incidence of liner pitting. Liner pitting due to coolant cavitation is a complex function of many engine design parameters and operating conditions as described in reference [1]*. Traditionally, liner cavitation problems were not detected early in the development cycle. Traditional liner vibration and coolant pressure measurements in conjunction with a numerous amount of expensive engine endurance tests were then needed to resolve cavitation problems. A method newly developed by the author and described in reference [2] for cavitation intensity measurements was successfully utilized to map out engine operating condition and develop limit curves. This method could also be applied in a non intrusive fashion.
Technical Paper

Real Time Captivation Detection Method

1996-02-01
960878
Cavitation corrosion is a very complex phenomenon that is governed by a formidable amount of factors and parameters. The phenomenon is a multi-disciplinary one which involves several aspects of physical sciences and engineering. This process is a slow progressive phenomenon with its detrimental effects being felt after severe damage has already occurred. A real time detection method for the severity of fluid cavitation and bubble collapse is described. The results are correlated to dynamic instantaneous pressure fluctuation measurements. The method is fast, reliable, and less restrictive of the sensing location. It has been tested and verified through a specially designed cavitation test rig and instrumentation setup. The method can be used for cavitation studies on ultrasonic bench rig tests and for cavitation measurements on running engines. The method was used to shed some light on characteristic cavitation differences between water and glycol which is used in engine coolants.
Technical Paper

Comparison of Measured and Theoretical Inter-Ring Gas Pressure on a Diesel Engine

1996-10-01
961909
Inter-ring gas pressure and piston ring motion are considered important for the control of oil consumption, particulate emissions, and reduced friction. For this reason, inter-ring gas pressure was measured on a diesel engine. Two different ring pack configurations were tested (positive and negative twist second rings). A significant difference in measured inter-ring pressure was observed. The measurements were compared to the predictions of a cylinder kit model with favorable results. Predictions showed that the observed difference between measured inter-ring pressures is caused by a significant difference in ring motion. The reasons for these differences are explained in this paper.
Technical Paper

The Cummins Signature 600 Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine

1998-02-23
981035
Design and development of the Cummins Signature 600, a new high horsepower dual overhead cam truck diesel engine, has been completed. The Signature 600 product system includes an all-new engine, controls, fuel system, and business information systems. During product definition, particular emphasis was placed on target markets, customer input to design, engineering and manufacturing processes, concurrent engineering and extensive mechanical and thermal analyses. Cummins Signature 600 fulfills the needs of Owner-Operator and Premium Fleet linehaul trucking businesses.
Technical Paper

Experimental Results on the Effect of Piston Surface Roughness and Porosity on Diesel Engine Combustion

1996-02-01
960036
Measurements have been made to determine the effect of piston crown surface properties on combustion. Back-to-back engine tests were conducted to compare surface modified pistons to a production piston. Each modified piston was found to prolong combustion duration. Porous coatings and a non porous, roughened piston were observed to increase fuel consumption. Increase in fuel consumption was determined to be the result of increased heat release duration. The data show surface roughness alone affects the duration of heat release. The shift in magnitude of the centroid of heat release was similar to the shift observed in insulated engine experiments.
Technical Paper

The Piston Ring Shape and Its Effects on Engine Performance

1996-02-01
960052
The paper presents the latest research results on the piston ring free shape. A new free shape measurement method with optical gauging was developed. Three numerical models to compute the contact force distribution of piston ring were developed using finite element analysis (FEA). These numerical methods have been compared each other, and validated with the experimental results of ring deformation in a ring gage. The contact force distribution of a piston ring at working condition was also studied. It consists of the ring thermal boundary conditions (RTBC) validation, 3-D FEA thermal analysis and thermal contact force computation based on validated wire-cable element model. The RTBC for heavy duty diesel engine has been validated for the first time using a CUMMINS L10 engine test. Three different free shapes have been tested. The wear band measurements of tested rings all show tremendous improvements over the standard top ring.
Technical Paper

New Piston Telemetry Applied to Spherical Joint Piston Development

1996-02-01
960056
A new telemetry system has been developed for temperature or strain measurements on a spherical joint piston. The system includes a piston mounted signal multiplexer and transmitter. A patented, piston mounted power generator operates in conjunction witii a modified cylinder liner. The telemetry system is robust, having high inertia load capability and high environmental temperature operating capability. The telemetry system was installed and operated on an engine motoring test rig. Temperature signals were transmitted at engine speeds from 400 rpm to 2100 rpm. Over 100 hours of high engine speed testing with oil sump temperatures up to 122°C were completed.
Technical Paper

Electronic Systems Integration: The Engine Manufacturer's Perspective

1996-10-01
962179
The increased use of on-board and off-board electronic systems with medium duty and heavy duty trucks and buses presents challenges with compatibility and proper integration. The vehicle architecture is taking shape to establish three areas of computer control-the powertrain, the cab instrument panel, and the cab operations center. The critical element of pursuing proper integration of these systems requires established and clear standards and test methods. Clear roles and responsibilities, a defined system architecture and common test methods are required between subsystem electronic product suppliers and vehicle manufacturers. The electronics integration challenges are presented in the context of the U.S. medium duty and heavy duty automotive industry but have broad applicability to other heavy vehicles and markets worldwide. SAE and ISO forums are needed to address these issues.
Technical Paper

A Powertrain Simulation for Engine Control System Development

1996-10-01
962171
A dynamic simulation of a school bus powertrain has been constructed for the purpose of assisting in the development of engine control strategies. With some extensions, this model can also be used as a first approximation to support the development of transmission shift control strategies, predict vehicle performance and drivability as well as estimate transient loads on the powertrain components. The simulation was constructed using the Matlab* computing environment along with the Simulink* toolbox, a package for the graphical development of dynamic simulation models. The vehicle model was validated against test data measured in the target vehicle powered by a natural gas engine to ensure that the simulation model yielded sensible predictions of the dynamic powertrain behavior. Equipped with a validated model, the control engineer can now use the simulation tool to assist in algorithm development. Sample applications are illustrated.
Technical Paper

A New Method for Engine Low Power Detection in Trucks

1997-11-17
973181
A new method for detecting the low power conditions on electronically-controlled diesel engines used in on-road vehicles has been developed. The advantage of this method is that it uses readily available diagnostic tools and engine installed sensors with no necessity for a dynamometer test. Without removing the engine, it gives an estimate of the real engine power which is accurate to 5%.
Technical Paper

Effect of Fuel Composition and Altitude on Regulated Emissions from a Lean-Burn, Closed Loop Controlled Natural Gas Engine

1997-05-01
971707
Natural gas presents several challenges to engine manufacturers for use as a heavy-duty, lean burn engine fuel. This is because natural gas can vary in composition and the variation is large enough to produce significant changes in the stoichiometry of the fuel and its octane number. Similarly, operation at high altitude can present challenges. The most significant effect of altitude is lower barometric pressure, typically 630 mm Hg at 1600 m compared to a sea level value of 760 mm. This can lower turbocharger boost at low speeds leading to mixtures richer than desired. The purpose of this test program was to determine the effect of natural gas composition and altitude on regulated emissions and performance of a Cummins B5.9G engine. The engine is a lean-burn, closed loop control, spark ignited, dedicated natural gas engine. For fuel composition testing the engine was operating at approximately 1600 m (5,280 ft) above sea level.
Technical Paper

Engineered Thermal Barrier Coatings for Diesels

1989-02-01
890297
Through an integrated process involving thermal/mechanical analysis, coating property characterization, plasma spray process control, and rig testing under simulated engine thermal conditions, plasma sprayed zirconia coatings have been defined which offer a high degree of thermal insulation. Analytical and rig tests results showed that a multi-layer coating, combined with control of residual stress during fabrication, offered the greatest potential for meeting the thermal insulation goals while providing the required durability in piston crown and cylinder head applications. Coating thicknesses ranging from 1.5 to 2.5 mm (0.06 to 0.10 inch) were evaluated and tested in the laboratory. Single cylinder engine tests of the multi-layer thermal barrier coatings have demonstrated that coatings up to 2.54 mm (0.10 in.) thick on pistons can operate at 1.03 MPa (150 psi) brake mean effective pressures (BMEP).
Technical Paper

The Effect of Raising Specific Output of a Highly Rated DI Diesel Truck Engine on its Performance and Emissions

1989-02-01
890263
A study was undertaken to establish what happens to engine emissions, and to turbocharger and injection pressure requirements, as the specific output is raised. For any given engine package, increasing specific output increases injection pressures while reducing air/fuel ratios. Thus, if the highly rated engine must satisfy the same design constraints, then raising the engine operating torque by only 10% resulted in more than 30% increase in total particulates! However, the same emission levels may be maintained if increases in specific output are accompanied by changes to engine design so as to maintain the air-fuel mixing parameters, specifically air/fuel ratio and injection pressures, throughout the entire engine operating conditions.
Technical Paper

Testing Procedures for Introduction of Silicon Carbide and Carbon Water Pump Seal Faces into Heavy Duty Diesel Service

1993-03-01
930585
Testing procedures to evaluate new coolant pump seal face materials and new coolant pump seal designs were evaluated. Rig testing of materials and seals followed by engine dynamometer testing enabled changes in the seal materials or design to be validated prior to field testing and limited production. These procedures were used to test and implement a coolant pump seal face material change to silicon carbide versus carbon. The change resulted in higher reliability for the coolant pump seal and reduced warranty cost for the engine.
Technical Paper

Cooling Higher Horsepower Highway Diesel Engines

1975-02-01
750131
The increase in power-to-weight ratio that results from the use of higher-horsepower diesel engines in highway service prompted this study of engine cooling. This paper covers the results obtained in testing different power-to-weight ratios on grades from sea level to over 11,000 ft and compares these results with those obtained from chassis and towing dynamometer cooling trials.
Technical Paper

Crankshaft Design Using a Generalized Finite Element Model

1979-02-01
790279
An analytical tool for the efficient analysis of crankshaft designs has been developed. Finite element models are generated from a limited number of key dimensions which describe a family of crankshafts. These models have been verified by stress and deflection measurements on several crankshaft throws.
Technical Paper

An Assessment of Turbocharging Systems for Diesel Engines from First and Second Law Perspectives

1988-02-01
880598
A number of turbocharging systems have been proposed for improving the drivability of diesel engines for heavy duty trucks. The systems studied here included resonant intake, wastegate, and variable geometry turbocharging. By imposing a fixed power, torque rise, and engine speed range, it was possible to evaluate the fuel economy impact of each approach. First Law and Second Law balances are included to illustrate the differences in the systems. It was found that variable geometry turbocharging provided the best fuel economy.
Technical Paper

An Evaluation of the Lucas Combustion Noise Meter on Cummins ‘B’ Series Engines

1987-08-01
870952
Lucas Industries Noise Centre has introduced a combustion noise meter which is designed to predict the contribution of the combustion process to overall diesel engine noise. The performance of the meter is evaluated using Cummins B series engines in naturally-aspirated and turbocharged form. Combustion noise levels predicted by the meter are compared to levels determined using traditional techniques. The effects of several engine operating parameters on combustion noise are investigated under both steady state and accelerating conditions. The meter reliably predicts changes in combustion noise levels, and is a useful tool for performance development engineers. Combustion noise is shown to be related to the maximum rate of pressure rise at the onset of combustion, but combustion noise is not reliably related to maximum cylinder pressures.
Technical Paper

Test Cell Simulation of the Driveby Noise Test

1987-08-01
870967
Diesel engine manufacturers have traditionally done most engine noise development work under steady: state operating conditions. However, truck driveby noise tests are acceleration tests, and engines exhibit different noise behavior under accelerating conditions. Acceleration noise can be affected by engine performance parameters which may have no influence on steady state noise levels. In this study, a test cell simulation of the truck driveby procedure has been developed and evaluated. Test cell simulation and truck driveby results are compared for a naturally-aspirated and a turbocharged engine. This simulation procedure has been shown to predict reliably results measured in vehicles. As a result, the simulation can be used to evaluate engine modifications during the development process without requiring a vehicle installation.
Technical Paper

Combustion Chamber Component Analysis for Advanced Heavy Duty Diesel Engines

1989-09-01
891900
Detailed thermal analysis was conducted on several advanced cylinder head, liner, and piston concepts, for low heat rejection diesel engines. The analysis was used to define an optimized engine configuration. Results pointed to the strategic use of oil cooling and insulation in the cylinder head, an oil cooled cylinder liner, and an insulated piston, with separate insulation behind the compression rings. Such a configuration reduced in-cylinder heat rejection by 30 percent, while durability would be expected to be maintained or improved from today's production levels.
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