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Video

Flexible Real-Time Simulation of Truck and Trailer Configurations

2011-12-05
Real-time simulation of truck and trailer combinations can be applied to hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) systems for developing and testing electronic control units (ECUs). The large number of configuration variations in vehicle and axle types requires the simulation model to be adjustable in a wide range. This paper presents a modular multibody approach for the vehicle dynamics simulation of single track configurations and truck-and-trailer combinations. The equations of motion are expressed by a new formula which is a combination of Jourdain's principle and the articulated body algorithm. With the proposed algorithm, a robust model is achieved that is numerically stable even at handling limits. Moreover, the presented approach is suitable for modular modeling and has been successfully implemented as a basis for various system definitions. As a result, only one simulation model is needed for a large variety of track and trailer types.
Video

Challenges in Automotive Electrification and Powertrain Component Development

2011-11-07
An overview of Daimler?s progression to advance powertrain technology in a growth industry shows many different solutions to improvement in transportation. Daimler continues to make breakthroughs in technology development and application building on 125 years of automotive development. Optimization of current powertrains will enable a significant gain in CO2/mi reductions, that dependent on product mix can be augmented with additional technologies. There is however no bypass to some form of electrification, enabling efficiency gains and alternative forms of power supply. Development of hybrid powertrains continues in an established manner and enhanced development of further electrified powertrains are in development. Organizationally and technically, significant skills and adjustments need to continue to be undertaken enabling OEMs and in particular the supply base to develop optimized solutions efficiently. The outlook is bright for novel component development and innovation.
Technical Paper

Automated Real-Time Testing of Electronic Control Units

2007-04-16
2007-01-0504
Today, hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) simulation is common practice as a testing methodology for electronic control units (ECUs). An essential criterion for the efficiency of an HIL system is the availability of powerful test automation having access to all of its hardware and software components (including I/O channels, failure insertion units, bus communication controllers and diagnostic interfaces). The growing complexity of vehicle embedded systems, which are interconnected by bus systems (like CAN, LIN or FlexRay), result in hundreds or even thousands of tests that have to be done to ensure the correct system functionality. This is best achieved by automated testing. Automated testing usually is performed by executing tests on a standard PC, which is interconnected to the HIL system. However, higher demands regarding timing precision are hard to accomplish. As an example, ECU interaction has to be captured and responded to in the range of milliseconds.
Technical Paper

Hardware-in-the-Loop Testing of Engine Control Units - A Technical Survey

2007-04-16
2007-01-0500
Due to tougher legislation on exhaust emissions reduction and the consumer demand for more power and mobility and less fuel consumption, the functionality in today's engine management systems continues to grow. The electronic engine control units (ECUs) have to perform more control tasks using new sensors and actuators, along with the corresponding self-diagnostics (OBD, on-board diagnosis). All this leads to continuously increasing demands on automated hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) test systems. HIL technology has advanced in parallel to the ECUs, and is today an indispensable tool for developing automotive electronics. This paper therefore aims to provide a comprehensive and state-of-the-art survey of HIL test systems for engine controllers. First of all, a brief introduction to the ECU's functionality is given.
Technical Paper

Hardware-in-the-Loop Test Systems for Electric Motors in Advanced Powertrain Applications

2007-04-16
2007-01-0498
Electric drives are growing in importance in automotive applications, especially in hybrid electric vehicles (HEV) and in the vehicle dynamics area (steering systems, etc.). The challenges of real-time hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) simulation and testing of electric drives are addressed in this paper. In general, three different interface levels between the electric drive and the hardware-inthe-loop system can be distinguished: the signal level (1), the electrical level (2) and the mechanical level (3). These interface levels, as well as modeling and I/O-related aspects of electric drives and power electronics devices, are discussed in detail in the paper. Finally, different solutions based on dSPACE simulator technology are presented, for both hybrid vehicle and steering applications.
Technical Paper

Behavior Modeling Tools in an Architecture-Driven Development Process - From Function Models to AUTOSAR

2007-04-16
2007-01-0507
This paper will first introduce and classify the basic principles of architecture-driven software development and will briefly sketch the presumed development process. This background information is then used to explain extensions which enable current behavior modeling and code generation tools to operate as software component generators. The generation of AUTOSAR software components using dSPACE's production code generator TargetLink is described as an example.
Technical Paper

Towards an Aspect Driven Approach for the Analysis, Evaluation and Optimization of Safety Within the Automotive Industry

2010-04-12
2010-01-0208
An approach will be presented how development projects for safety-related and software-intensive automotive systems can be controlled through the application of model-based risk assessment. Therefore specific control measures have to be developed, which represent the degree of fulfilment of several aspects of safety-related developments. The control measures are evaluated through the analysis of risk-reducing aspects, for which the process of identification and specification is described. Thus, a framework for the creation of a probabilistic and aspect-oriented risk-analysis model (AORA) for safety related projects within automotive industries is currently under development. With respect to the upcoming safety standard ISO 26262 the twofold approach focuses on both, the identification and specification of risk-reducing aspects within the development as well as the application of a probabilistic reasoning model.
Technical Paper

Low-speed Boom Noise - Escalating Relevance According to CO2- Targets and High Torque Engines

2012-06-13
2012-01-1547
The increasing shift of drive operation towards efficient engine operation points at very low engine speeds demands a concerted design and tuning of engine, drive-train, assembly attachment and body to avoid annoying low speed boom noise. An additional challenge in this area of conflict is the increasing torque of modern engines at low engine speeds. As an example for a standard passenger car, the modes of operation, which may lead to low speed boom noise, are described. Setting levers along the complete chain of effect are characterised - from cylinder pressure up to the radiating surfaces of the interior. To achieve challenging NVH-targets the application of nonlinear simulation systems is indispensable, in particular in the concept phase of a vehicle. The use of multi-body simulation is presented for a concentrated NVH-optimisation of powertrain and rear axle vibration behaviour to reduce low-speed boom noise. On entire vehicle level hybrid simulation models are useful.
Technical Paper

Development of Energy Management Strategies and Analysis with Standard Drive Cycles for Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles

2012-09-10
2012-01-1609
In order to reduce fuel consumption in Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles, effective distribution of power demand between Fuel Cell and Battery is required. Energy management strategies can improve fuel economy by meeting power demand efficiently. This paper explains development of various energy management strategies for Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle with Lithium Ion Battery. Drive cycles used for optimization and analysis of the strategies are New European Drive cycles (NEDC), Japanese Drive cycles (JAP1015), City Drive cycles, Highway Drive cycles (FHDS) and Federal Urban Drive cycles (FUDS). All Fuel consumption and ageing calculations are done using backward model implemented in MATLAB/SIMULINK.
Technical Paper

Using Simulation to Verify Diagnosis Algorithms of Electronic Systems

2009-04-20
2009-01-1043
In modern vehicles the architecture of electronics is growing more and more complex because both the number of electronic functions – e.g. implemented as software modules – as well as the level of networking between electronic control units (ECUs) is steadily increasing. This complexity leads to greater propagation of failure symptoms, and diagnosing the causes of failure becomes a new challenge. Diagnostics aims at detecting failures such as defect sensors or faulty communication messages. It is subdivided into diagnosis algorithms on an ECU and algorithms running offboard, e.g. on a diagnostic tester. These algorithms have to complement each other in the best possible way. While in the past the diagnosis algorithm was developed late in the development process, nowadays there are efforts to start the development of such algorithms earlier – at least in parallel to developing a new feature itself. This would allow developers to verify the diagnosis algorithms in early design stages.
Technical Paper

Hardware-in-the-Loop Testing in the Context of ISO 26262

2012-04-16
2012-01-0035
Hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) simulation is now a standard component in the vehicle development process as a method for testing electronic control unit (ECU) software. HIL simulation is used for all aspects of development, naturally including safety-relevant functions and systems. This applies to all test tasks (from function testing to release tests, testing a single ECU or an ECU network, and so on) and also to different vehicle domains: The drivetrain, vehicle dynamics, driver assistance systems, interior/comfort systems and infotainment are all tested by HIL simulation. At the same time, modern vehicles feature more and more safety-related systems such as Adaptive Cruise Control, Electronic Stability Program, Power Assisted Steering, and Integrated Chassis Management.
Technical Paper

Advantages and Challenges of Closed-Loop HIL Testing for Commercial and Off-Highway Vehicles

2009-10-06
2009-01-2841
Hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) testing is used by commercial vehicle original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) in several fields of electronics development. HIL tests are a part of the standard development process for engine and machine control systems. For electronic control units (ECUs), not only the HIL test of the hardware but also the controller software validation is very important. For hardware diagnostics validation, a dynamic simulation of the real system could be omitted and an open-loop test of the controller is sufficient in most cases. For most controller software validation including OBD (on-board diagnosis) tests, detailed but real-time capable models have to be used. This article describes the needs and challenges of models in hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) based testing, taking into account the wide range of commercial and off-highway vehicles.
Technical Paper

Numerical Simulation of the Flow through an Alternator inside an Engine Compartment of a Passenger Car

2009-10-01
2009-01-3068
In this study the numerical simulation of the flow through an alternator inside an engine compartment of a passenger car is investigated. Specifically the interaction of the flow through the alternator with the flow through the engine compartment is explored in detail. The results are compared with a corresponding numerical simulation of an alternator in a surrounding of a test facility and with a numerical simulation of the flow through an engine compartment without taking into account the internal flow through the alternator. Finally the air temperature near the alternator and also the temperature of some components inside the alternator are compared with experimental values measured during a typical load case used for the thermal protection of the passenger car.
Technical Paper

Advancements in Hardware-in-the-Loop Technology in Support of Complex Integration Testing of Embedded System Software

2011-04-12
2011-01-0443
Automotive technology is rapidly changing with electrification of vehicles, driver assistance systems, advanced safety systems etc. This advancement in technology is making the task of validation and verification of embedded software complex and challenging. In addition to the component testing, integration testing imposes even tougher requirements for software testing. To meet these challenges dSPACE is continuously evolving the Hardware-In-the-Loop (HIL) technology to provide a systematic way to manage this task. The paper presents developments in the HIL hardware technology with latest quad-core processors, FPGA based I/O technology and communication bus systems such as Flexray. Also presented are developments of the software components such as advanced user interfaces, GPS information integration, real-time testing and simulation models. This paper provides a real-world example of implication of integration testing on HIL environment for Chassis Controls.
Technical Paper

Hybrid Drivetrain Simulation for Hardware-in-the-Loop Applications

2011-04-12
2011-01-0455
This paper describes challenges and possible solution of hybrid electrical vehicles test systems with a special focus on hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) test bench. The degree of novelty of this work can be seen in the fact that development and test of ECU for hybrid electrical powertrains can move more and more from mechanical test benches with real automotive components to HIL test systems. The challenging task in terms of electrical interface between an electric motor ECU and an HIL system and necessary real-time capable simulation models for electric machines have been investigated and partly solved. Even cell balancing strategies performed by battery management systems (BMU) can be developed and tested using HIL technology with battery simulation models and a precise cell voltage simulation on electrical level.
Technical Paper

Virtual Transfer Path Analysis at Daimler Trucks

2009-05-19
2009-01-2243
As for passenger cars, the overall noise and vibration comfort in commercial trucks and busses becomes an increasingly important sales argument. In order to effectively reduce the noise and vibration levels it is required to identify possible NVH issues at an early stage in the vehicle development process. For this reason a so-called “Virtual Transfer Path Analysis” (VTPA) method has been implemented which combines the results obtained from the conventional multi-body simulation and finite element method approaches. The resulting VTPA tool enables Daimler Trucks to systematically investigate and predict the complex interaction between powertrain excitation and the resulting vehicle response well before hardware prototypes become available. An overview of the theory is presented as well as the practical application and outcome of the technique applied in a past product development.
Technical Paper

Key Factors for Successful Integration of Automatic Code Generation in Series Production Development

2009-04-20
2009-01-0154
Model-based development and autocoding have become common practice in the automotive industry over the past few years. The industry is using these methods to tackle a situation in which complexity is constantly growing and development times are constantly decreasing, while the safety requirements for the software stay the same or even increase. The debate is no longer whether these methods are useful, but rather on the conditions for achieving optimum results with them. From the experiences made during the last decade this paper shows some of the key factors helping to achieve success when introducing or extending the deployment of automatic code generation in a model-based design process.
Technical Paper

Flow Maldistribution Effects on DPF Performance

2009-04-20
2009-01-1280
This paper focuses on some of the DPF system design issues where 3-dimensional modeling is necessary. The study is based on an existing 3-dimensional DPF model (axitrap) which is coupled to a commercial CFD code (Star-CD, CD-Adapco). The main focus is the effect of the inlet pipe geometry on soot distribution in the filter during loading and regeneration mode. The results show that due to the self-balancing effect, the resulting soot distribution in the filter under typical loading modes with low flow rates is quite uniform. With the assumption of adiabatic inlet pipe, the effect of non-symmetric inlet pipe is also negligible even during regeneration. However, under the realistic assumption of a non-adiabatic inlet pipe, the effect of inlet pipe geometry becomes very significant. Especially, for the case of a bent-shaped inlet pipe, the risk of impartial regeneration of the filter increases significantly.
Technical Paper

Advances in Rapid Control Prototyping - Results of a Pilot Project for Engine Control -

2005-04-11
2005-01-1350
The technological development in the field of automotive electronics is proceeding at almost break-neck speed. The functions being developed and integrated into cars are growing in complexity and volume. With the increasing number and variety of sensors and actuators, electronics have to handle a greater amount of data, and the acquisition and generation of I/O signals is also growing in complexity, for example, in engine management applications. Moreover, intelligent and complex algorithms need to be processed in a minimum of time. This all intensifies the need for Rapid Control Prototyping (RCP), a proven method of decisively speeding up the model-based software development process of automotive electronic control units (ECUs) [1],[2]. All these demanding tasks, including connecting sensors and actuators to the RCP system, need to be performed within a standard prototyping environment.
Technical Paper

How to Do Hardware-in-the-Loop Simulation Right

2005-04-11
2005-01-1657
Not only is the number of electronic control units (ECUs) in modern vehicles constantly increasing, the software of the ECUs is also becoming more complex. Both make testing a central task within the development of automotive electronics. Testing ECUs in real vehicles is time-consuming and costly, and comes very late in the automotive development process. It is therefore increasingly being replaced by laboratory tests using hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) simulation. While new software functions are still being developed or optimized, other functions are already undergoing certain tests, mostly on module level but also on system and integration level. To achieve the highest quality, testing must be done as early as possible within the development process. This paper describes the various test phases during the development of automotive electronics (from single function testing to network testing of all the ECUs of a vehicle).
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