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Technical Paper

Reliability of Resonant Micromachined Sensors and Actuators

2001-03-05
2001-01-0618
There are an increasing number of applications for resonant micromachines. Accelerometers, angular rate sensors, voltage controlled oscillators, pressure and chemical sensors have been demonstrated using this technology. Several of these devices are employed in vehicles. Vibrating devices have been made from silicon, quartz, GaAs, nickel and aluminum. Resonant microsystems are in constant motion and so present new challenges in the area of reliability for vehicular applications. The impact of temperature extremes, cyclic fatigue, stiction, thermal and mechanical shock on resonant device performance is covered.
Technical Paper

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Auxiliary Power Unit - A Paradigm Shift in Electric Supply for Transportation

2000-11-01
2000-01-C070
Delphi Automotive Systems and BMW have been jointly developing Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) technology for application in the transportation industry primarily as an on-board Auxiliary Power Unit (APU). In the first application of this joint program, the APU will be used to power an electric air conditioning system without the need for operating the vehicle engine. The SOFC-based APU technology has the potential to provide a paradigm shift in the supply of electric power for passenger cars. Furthermore, supplementing the conventional fuel with reformate in the internal combustion engine, extremely low emissions and high system efficiencies are possible. This is consistent with the increasing power demands in automobiles in the new era of more comfort and safety along with environmental friendliness.
Technical Paper

Characterization of the Dynamic Response of a Cylinder Deactivation Valvetrain System

2001-03-05
2001-01-0669
This paper presents a theoretical and experimental study of a cylinder deactivation valvetrain system for the integration into an Engine Management System (EMS). A control-oriented lumped parameter model of the deactivation valvetrain system is developed and implemented using Matlab/Simulink, and validated by experimental data. Through simulation and experimental data analysis, the effect of operating conditions on the dynamic response is captured and characterized, over a wide range of operating conditions. The algorithm provides a basis for the calibration of the deactivation hardware. The generic characterization of the dynamic response can simplify the calibration parameters for the implementation in engine management systems.
Technical Paper

Engine Control Using Torque Estimation

2001-03-05
2001-01-0995
In recent years, the increasing interest and requirements for improved engine diagnostics and control has led to the implementation of several different sensing and signal processing technologies. In order to optimize the performance and emission of an engine, detailed and specified knowledge of the combustion process inside the engine cylinder is required. In that sense, the torque generated by each combustion event in an IC engine is one of the most important variables related to the combustion process and engine performance. This paper introduces torque estimation techniques in the real-time basis for engine control applications using the measurement of crankshaft speed variation. The torque estimation scheme presented in this paper consists of two entirely different approaches, “Stochastic Analysis” and “Frequency Analysis”.
Technical Paper

Identification and Elimination of Steering Systems Squawk Noise

1997-05-20
972058
The problem being investigated involves a noise-quality issue on a power steering application, when a sudden change of steering wheel angle generates an unwanted steering system noise or “Squawk.” This phenomenon is mostly observed during parking maneuvers, especially at lock positions and when the hydraulic fluid reaches a critical temperature on the specific application. The objective of the work to solve this noise-quality issue was to first identify the cause and then eliminate the Squawk noise. There were several constraints: No change could be made in the properties or type of hydraulic fluid used due to specification requirements; Steering wheel valve torsion bar characteristic (torque vs. angle) needed to be maintained within specification for ride and handling purposes; and, In addition to the mentioned constraints, a high capability of noise elimination generated by the production tolerances and dispersion has been considered.
Technical Paper

Air Cleaner Shell Noise Reduction with Finite Element Shape Optimization

1997-05-20
971876
In this paper, finite element shape optimization is used to determine the optimum air cleaner shape and rib design for low shell noise. Shape variables are used to vary the height and location of rib elements, as well as vary the shape of the air cleaner surfaces. The optimization code evaluates each design variation and selects a search direction that will reduce surface velocity. Sound power radiation is calculated for each optimized design using an acoustic code. Large reductions in shell noise were achieved by optimizing the shape of the air cleaner surface and rib design. Optimization of the rib pattern alone yielded a local optimization, as opposed to a global optimization that represented the best possible design.
Technical Paper

Emission Formation Mechanisms in a Two-Stroke Direct-Injection Engine

1998-10-19
982697
Engine tests were conducted to study the effect of fuel-air mixture preparation on the combustion and emission performance of a two-stroke direct-injection engine. The in-cylinder mixture distribution was altered by changing the injection system, injection timing, and by substituting the air in an air-assisted injector with nitrogen. Two injection systems which produce significantly different mixtures were investigated; an air-assisted injector with a highly atomized spray, and a single-fluid high pressure-swirl injector with a dense penetrating spray. The engine was operated at overall A/F ratios of 30:1, where stratification was necessary to ensure stable combustion; and at 20:1 and 15:1 where it was possible to operate in a nearly homogeneous mode. Moderate engine speeds and loads were investigated. The effects of the burning-zone A/F ratio were isolated by using nitrogen as the working fluid in the air-assist injector.
Technical Paper

CFD-Aided Development of Spray for an Outwardly Opening Direct Injection Gasoline Injector

1998-02-23
980493
A high pressure outwardly opening fuel injector has been developed to produce sprays that meet the stringent requirements of gasoline direct injection (DI) combustion systems. Predictions of spray characteristics have been made using KIVA-3 in conjunction with Star-CD injector flow modeling. After some modeling iterations, the nozzle design has been optimized for the required flow, injector performance, and spray characteristics. The hardware test results of flow and spray have confirmed the numerical modeling accuracy and the spray quality. The spray's average Sauter mean diameter (SMD) is less than 15 microns at 30 mm distance from the nozzle. The DV90, defined as the drop diameter such that 90% of the total liquid volume is in drops of smaller diameter, is less than 40 microns. The maximum penetration is about 70 mm into air at atmospheric pressure. An initial spray slug is not created due to the absence of a sac volume.
Technical Paper

Full Hybrid Electrical Vehicle Battery Pack System Design, CFD Simulation and Testing

2010-04-12
2010-01-1080
CFD analysis was performed using the FLUENT software to design the thermal system for a hybrid vehicle battery pack. The battery pack contained multiple modular battery elements, called bricks, and the inlet and outlet bus bars that electrically connected the bricks into a series string. The simulated thermal system was comprised of the vehicle cabin, seat cavity, inlet plenum, battery pack, a downstream centrifugal fan, and the vehicle trunk. The fan was modeled using a multiple reference frame approach. A full system analysis was done for airflow and thermal performance optimization to ensure the most uniform cell temperatures under all operating conditions. The mesh for the full system was about 13 million cells run on a 6-node HP cluster. A baseline design was first analyzed for fluid-thermal performance. Subsequently, multiple design iterations were run to create uniform airflow among all the individual bricks while minimizing parasitic pressure drop.
Technical Paper

Energy Harvesting as Strategy for Reducing Vehicles Emissions

2012-10-02
2012-36-0114
In vehicular mobility context, it is extremely important for the environmental sustainability that the available energy will be used as efficiently as possible, both in the use of internal combustion engines (ICE) as powertrain, as well in the application of Hybrid and Electric Vehicle Motors (HEV/EV). In this comparison, ICE has a lower efficiency when compared to electric motors, wasting much of the potential energy of the fuel in form of heat and noise. On the other hand, the electric vehicles face limitation in autonomy and recharge time, demanding for a more efficient use of energy stored in batteries. This study aims to present emerging technologies for reuse of energy within the automotive context, originally known as “Energy Harvesting” and “Renewable Energies”.
Technical Paper

Thermal Electric Analysis of Bond Wires Used in Automotive Electronic Modules

2015-04-14
2015-01-0195
Bond wires are used in automotive electronic modules to carry current from external harness to components where flexibility under thermal cyclic loading is very essential between PCB (Printed Circuit Board) and connectors. They are very thin wires (few μm) made up of gold, aluminum or copper and have to undergo mechanical reliability to withstand extreme mechanical and thermal loads during different vehicle operation scenarios. Thermal reliability of bond wire is to make sure that it can withstand prescribed electric current under given boundary conditions without fusing thereby retaining electronic module's functionality. While carrying current, bond wire by virtue of its nature resists electric current flow and generates heat also called as joule heating. Joule heating is proportional to current flow and electrical resistance and if not handled properly can lead to thermal run away conditions.
Technical Paper

Development of Electrical-Electronic Controls for a Gasoline Direct Injection Compression Ignition Engine

2016-04-05
2016-01-0614
Delphi is developing a new combustion technology called Gasoline Direct-injection Compression Ignition (GDCI), which has shown promise for substantially improving fuel economy. This new technology is able to reuse some of the controls common to traditional spark ignition (SI) engines; however, it also requires several new sensors and actuators, some of which are not common to traditional SI engines. Since this is new technology development, the required hardware set has continued to evolve over the course of the project. In order to support this development work, a highly capable and flexible electronic control system is necessary. Integrating all of the necessary functions into a single controller, or two, would require significant up-front controller hardware development, and would limit the adaptability of the electronic controls to the evolving requirements for GDCI.
Technical Paper

Individual Cylinder Fuel Control with a Switching Oxygen Sensor

1999-03-01
1999-01-0546
In this paper we discuss in detail an algorithm that addresses cylinder-to-cylinder imbalance issues. Maintaining even equivalence-ratio (ϕ) control across all the cylinders of an engine is confounded by imbalances which include fuel-injector flow variations, fresh-air intake maldistribution and uneven distribution of Exhaust Gas Re-circulation (EGR). Moreover, in markets that are growing increasingly cost conscious, with ever tightening emissions regulations, correcting for such mismatches must not only be done, but done at little or no additional cost. To address this challenge, we developed an Individual Cylinder Fuel Control (ICFC) algorithm that estimates each cylinder's individual ϕ and then compensates to correct for any imbalance using only existing production hardware. Prior work in this area exists1,2, yet all disclosed production-intent work was performed using wide-range oxygen sensors, representing cost increases.
Technical Paper

Closed Loop Start of Combustion Control Utilizing Ionization Sensing in a Diesel Engine

1999-03-01
1999-01-0549
This paper describes the technique of in-cylinder ionization sensing in a common rail diesel engine. The technology detects in real time, the start of combustion for both pilot and main combustion enabling the fuel control strategy to change from open to closed loop, thus, maintaining the desired start of combustion for all speeds and loads. Additionally, the ionization sensing enables the ECM to truly correct for changes in ignition delays caused by as an example a change in fuel cetane number or in air, fuel and engine temperature. The conclusions are that ionization sensing improves the ability to control a diesel engine and is a feasible technology for production vehicles.
Technical Paper

Mean Value Engine Modelling of an SI Engine with EGR

1999-03-01
1999-01-0909
Mean Value Engine Models (MVEMs) are simplified, dynamic engine models which are physically based. Such models are useful for control studies, for engine control system analysis and for model based engine control systems. Very few published MVEMs have included the effects of Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR). The purpose of this paper is to present a modified MVEM which includes EGR in a physical way. It has been tested using newly developed, very fast manifold pressure, manifold temperature, port and EGR mass flow sensors. Reasonable agreement has been obtained on an experiemental engine, mounted on a dynamometer.
Technical Paper

Powertrains of the Future: Reducing the Impact of Transportation on the Environment

1999-03-01
1999-01-0991
Tomorrow's winning powertrain solutions reside in those technology combinations providing optimized propulsion systems with zero emissions and no cost or performance penalty compared with today's vehicles. The recent Kyoto Protocol for CO2 reduction and the California Air Resources Board (CARB) thrust for zero emission vehicles along with the European Regulatory community, motivate car manufacturers to adopt new light body structures with low aerodynamic drag coefficients, low-rolling resistance and the highest efficiency powertrains. The environmental equation expresses car manufacturers aptitude and desire to create zero emission vehicles at acceptable levels of performance unlike limited range electrical powered vehicle products. The cheapest solution to the environmental equation remains the conventional internal combustion engine ($30 to $50 per kW).
Technical Paper

Advanced Engine Management Using On-Board Gasoline Partial Oxidation Reforming for Meeting Super-ULEV (SULEV) Emissions Standards

1999-08-17
1999-01-2927
This paper first reports on the benchmarking of a gasoline- fueled vehicle currently for sale in California that is certified to ULEV standards. Emissions data from this vehicle indicate the improvements necessary over current technology to meet SULEV tailpipe standards. Tests with this vehicle also show emissions levels with current technology under off-cycle conditions representative of real-world use. We then present Delphi's strategy of on-board partial oxidation (POx) reforming with gasoline-fueled, spark-ignition engines. On-board reforming provides a source of hydrogen fuel. Tests were run with bottled gas simulating the output of a POx reformer. Results show that an advanced Engine Management System with a small on-board reformer can provide very low tailpipe emissions both under cold start and warmed-up conditions using relatively small amounts of POx gas. The data cover both normal US Federal Test Procedure (FTP) conditions as well as more extreme, off-cycle operation.
Technical Paper

An Engine Coolant Temperature Model and Application for Cooling System Diagnosis

2000-03-06
2000-01-0939
A coolant temperature model of an internal combustion engine has been formulated to meet the new On-Board Diagnostics II (OBD II) requirement for coolant temperature rationality. The model utilizes information available within the production Engine Control Module (ECM). The temperature prediction capability has been tested for various “real-world” driving conditions and cycles along with regulated drive cycles. The model can be calibrated to find the appropriate timing for initiation of a diagnostic algorithm for engine cooling system and Coolant Temperature Sensor (CTS) faults. A diagnostic scheme has been developed to detect and isolate various types of cooling system failures using engine soak time information available from a low power timer in the ECM.
Technical Paper

Flow Simulation of a Direct-Injection Gasoline Diaphragm Fuel Pump with Structural Interactions

2000-03-06
2000-01-1047
The fluid flow in a direct-injection gasoline diaphragm fuel pump is analyzed using a multi-physics simulation program. The analysis accounts for fully coupled fluid-structure interactions (FSI), the effects of the diaphragm movement and its deformation, the FSI between the diaphragm and the fluid, the FSI between the inlet/outlet valves and the fluid, and the solid-solid contact between the inlet/outlet valves and the valve seats. The flow rate of the fuel pump under various cam speeds is examined. The accuracy of the predictions for the flow rate of the fuel pump is assessed through comparisons with the experimental data, and moderately good agreement is obtained. In addition, some conclusions based on this study are summarized for reference.
Technical Paper

Application of Non-Thermal Plasma Assisted Catalyst Technology for Diesel Engine Emission Reduction

2000-08-21
2000-01-3088
With new legislation and federal regulation for vehicle emission levels, automotive and truck manufacturers have been prompted to focus on emission control technologies that limit the level of exhaust pollutants. One of the primary pollutants, especially from diesel engines, is oxides of nitrogen (NOx). One possible solution to this pollution challenge is to design a more efficient internal combustion engine, which would require better engine operating parameter controls. However, there are limitations associated with such tight engine management. This need has led researchers and engineers to focus on the development of exhaust aftertreatment devices that will reduce NOx emissions with current diesel engines. An optimum aftertreatment device must be unaffected by exhaust-gas impurity poisoning such as sulfur products, and must have minimal impact on vehicle operations and fuel economy.
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