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Technical Paper

Testing Networked ECUs in a HIL Based Integration Lab

2006-10-31
2006-01-3495
Modern vehicles use Electronic Control Units (ECU), connected via Controller Area Network (CAN) to perform functions. Many of these functions are distributed across several ECUs. This network interconnection enables the sharing of sensors, calculated information and actuators. As new functionality is added, the number of ECUs and their complexity increase. This paper describes the values and possibilities of a Hardware-In-the-Loop (HIL) based Integration Lab, which enables a wide range of automatic tests to be performed on networked ECUs. The Integration Lab is the complex rebuild of a Scania truck/bus, containing the ECU superset, for connecting and testing networked ECUs. It involves more than 30 ECUs and eleven CAN networks.
Technical Paper

A State-Space Simplified SCR Catalyst Model for Real Time Applications

2008-04-14
2008-01-0616
The use of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) is becoming increasingly more popular as a way of reducing NOx emissions from heavy duty vehicles while maintaining competitive operating costs. In order to make efficient use of these systems, it's important to have a complete system approach when it comes to calibration of the engine and aftertreatment system. This paper presents a simplified model of a heavy duty SCR catalyst, primarily intended for use in combination with an engine-out emissions model to perform model based offline optimization of the complete system. The traditional way of modelling catalysts using a dense discretization of the catalyst channels and non-linear differential equation solvers to solve the heat and mass balance equations, requires too much computational power in this application. The presented model is also useful in other applications such as model based control.
Technical Paper

A Study of In-Cylinder Fuel Spray Formation and its Influence on Exhaust Emissions Using an Optical Diesel Engine

2010-05-05
2010-01-1498
Increasingly stringent emission legislation as well as increased demand on fuel efficiency calls for further research and development in the diesel engine field. Spray formation, evaporation and ignition delay are important factors that influence the combustion and emission formation processes in a diesel engine. Increased understanding of the mixture formation process is valuable in the development of low emission, high efficiency diesel engines. In this paper spray formation and ignition under real engine conditions have been studied in an optical engine capable of running close to full load for a real HD diesel engine. Powerful external lights were used to provide the required light intensity for high speed camera images in the combustion chamber prior to ignition. A specially developed software was used for spray edge detection and tracking. The software provides crank angle resolved spray penetration data.
Technical Paper

Characterisation and Model Based Optimization of a Complete Diesel Engine/SCR System

2009-04-20
2009-01-0896
In order to make efficient use of a Diesel engine equipped with an SCR system, it's important to have a complete system approach when it comes to calibration of the engine and the aftertreatment system. This paper presents a complete model of a heavy duty diesel engine equipped with a vanadia based SCR system. The diesel engine uses common rail fuel injection, a variable geometry turbocharger (VGT) and cooled EGR. The engine model consists of a quasi steady gas exchange model combined with a two-zone zero dimensional combustion model. The combustion model is a predictive heat release model. Using the calculated zone temperatures, the corresponding NOx concentration is given by the original Zeldovich mechanism. The SCR catalyst model is of the state space type. The basic model structure is a series of continuously stirred tank reactors and the catalyst walls are discretized to describe mass transport inside the porous structure.
Technical Paper

Modelling Diesel Engine Combustion and NOx Formation for Model Based Control and Simulation of Engine and Exhaust Aftertreatment Systems

2006-04-03
2006-01-0687
Emissions standards are becoming increasingly harder to reach without the use of exhaust aftertreatment systems such as Selective Catalytic Reduction and particulate filters. In order to make efficient use of these systems it is important to have accurate models of engine-out emissions. Such models are also useful for optimizing and controlling next-generation engines without aftertreatment using for example exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). Engines are getting more advanced using systems such as common rail fuel injection, variable geometry turbochargers (VGT) and EGR. With these new technologies and active control of the injection timing, more sophisticated models than simple stationary emission maps must be used to get adequate results. This paper is focused on the calculation of engine-out NOx and engine parameters such as cylinder pressure, temperature and gas flows.
Technical Paper

Pressure Amplitude Influence on Pulsating Exhaust Flow Energy Utilization

2018-04-03
2018-01-0972
A turbocharged Diesel engine for heavy-duty on-road vehicle applications employs a compact exhaust manifold to satisfy transient torque and packaging requirements. The small exhaust manifold volume increases the unsteadiness of the flow to the turbine. The turbine therefore operates over a wider flow range, which is not optimal as radial turbines have narrow peak efficiency zone. This lower efficiency is compensated to some extent by the higher energy content of the unsteady exhaust flow compared to steady flow conditions. This paper experimentally investigates the relationship between exhaust energy utilization and available energy at the turbine inlet at different degrees of unsteady flow. A special exhaust manifold has been constructed which enables the internal volume of the manifold to be increased. The larger volume reduces the exhaust pulse amplitude and brings the operating condition for the turbine closer to steady-flow.
Technical Paper

Surge Detection Using Knock Sensors in a Heavy Duty Diesel Engine

2017-09-04
2017-24-0050
Improving turbocharger performance to increase engine efficiency has the potential to help meet current and upcoming exhaust legislation. One limiting factor is compressor surge, an air flow instability phenomenon capable of causing severe vibration and noise. To avoid surge, the turbocharger is operated with a safety margin (surge margin) which, as well as avoiding surge in steady state operation, unfortunately also lowers engine performance. This paper investigates the possibility of detecting compressor surge with a conventional engine knock sensor. It further recommends a surge detection algorithm based on their signals during transient engine operation. Three knock sensors were mounted on the turbocharger and placed along the axes of three dimensions of movement. The engine was operated in load steps starting from steady state. The steady state points of operation covered the vital parts of the engine speed and load range.
Technical Paper

Knock Sensor Based Virtual Combustion Sensor Signal Bias Sensitivity

2018-04-03
2018-01-1154
The combustion in a direct injected internal combustion engine is normally open-loop controlled. The introduction of cylinder pressure sensors enables a virtual combustion sensor which in turn enables closed-loop combustion control, and the possibility to counteract effects such as engine part-to-part variation, component ageing and fuel quality diversity. Closed-loop combustion control requires precise, robust and preferably cheap sensors. This paper presents an investigation of the robustness and the limitation of a knock sensor based virtual combustion sensor. This virtual combustion sensor utilize the common heat release analysis using a knock sensor based virtual cylinder pressure signal. Major virtual sensor error sources in a heavy-duty engine were identified as: the specific heat ratio model, the boost pressure and the crank angle phasing. The virtual sensor errors were quantified in relation to both the measured cylinder pressure and the total virtual sensor error.
Technical Paper

Cylinder Pressure Based Cylinder Charge Estimation in Diesel Engines with Dual Independent Variable Valve Timing

2018-04-03
2018-01-0862
With stricter emission legislations and demands on low fuel consumption, new engine technologies are continuously investigated. At the same time the accuracy in the over all engine control and diagnosis and hence also the required estimation accuracy is tightened. Central for the internal combustion control is the trapped cylinder charge and composition Traditionally cylinder charge is estimated using mean intake manifold pressure and engine speed in a two dimensional lookup table. With the introduction of variable valve timing, two additional degrees of freedom are introduced that makes this approach very time consuming and therefore expensive. Especially if the cam phasers are given large enough authority to offer powerful thermal management possibilities. The paper presents a physical model for estimating in-cylinder trapped mass and residual gas fraction utilizing cylinder pressure measurements, and intake and exhaust valve lift profiles.
Technical Paper

Agglomeration and Nucleation of Non-Volatile Particles in a Particle Grouping Exhaust Pipe of a Euro VI Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine

2019-01-15
2019-01-0044
The possibility of non-volatile particle agglomeration in engine exhaust was experimentally examined in a Euro VI heavy duty engine using a variable cross section agglomeration pipe, insulated and double walled for minimal thermophoresis. The agglomeration pipe was located between the turbocharger and the exhaust treatment devices. Sampling was made across the pipe and along the centre-line of the agglomeration pipe. The performance of the agglomeration pipe was compared with an equivalent insulated straight pipe. The non-volatile total particle number and size distribution were investigated. Particle number measurements were conducted according to the guidelines from the Particle Measurement Programme. The Engine was fuelled with commercially available low sulphur S10 diesel.
Technical Paper

Knock Sensor Based Virtual Cylinder Pressure Sensor

2019-01-15
2019-01-0040
Typically the combustion in a direct injected compression ignited internal combustion engine is open-loop controlled. The introduction of a cylinder pressure sensor opens up the possibility of a virtual combustion sensor which could enable closed-loop combustion control and thus the potential to counteract effects such as engine part to part variation, component ageing and fuel quality diversity. Closed-loop combustion control requires precise, robust and preferably cheap sensors. This paper presents a virtual cylinder pressure sensor based on the signal from the inexpensive but well proven knock sensor. The method used to convert the knock sensor signal into a pressure estimate included the stages: Phase correcting the raw signal, Filtering the raw signal, Scaling the signal to known thermodynamic laws and provided engine sensors signals and Reconstructing parts of the signal with other known models and assumptions.
Technical Paper

Future Fuels for DISI Engines: A Review on Oxygenated, Liquid Biofuels

2019-01-15
2019-01-0036
Global warming and climate change have led to a greater interest in the implementation of biofuels in internal combustion engines. In spark ignited engines, biofuels have been shown to improve efficiency and knock resistance while decreasing emissions of unburned hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide and particles. This study investigates the effect of biofuels on SI engine combustion through a graphical compilation of previously reported results. Experimental data from 88 articles were used to evaluate the trends of the addition of different biofuels in gasoline. Graphs illustrating engine performance, combustion phasing and emissions are presented in conjunction with data on the physiochemical properties of each biofuel component to understand the observed trends. Internal combustion engines have the ability to handle a wide variety of fuels resulting in a broad range of biofuel candidates.
Technical Paper

Study on Heat Losses during Flame Impingement in a Diesel Engine Using Phosphor Thermometry Surface Temperature Measurements

2019-04-02
2019-01-0556
In-cylinder heat losses in diesel engines decrease engine efficiency significantly and account for approximately 14-19% [1, 2, 3] of the injected fuel energy. A great part of the heat losses during diesel combustion presumably arises from the flame impingement onto the piston. Therefore, the present study investigates the heat losses during flame impingement onto the piston bowl wall experimentally. The measurements were performed on a full metal heavy-duty diesel engine with a small optical access through a removed exhaust valve. The surface temperature at the impingement point of the flame was determined by evaluating a phosphor’s temperature dependent emission decay. Simultaneous cylinder pressure measurements and high-speed videos are associated to the surface temperature measurements in each cycle. Thus, surface temperature readings could be linked to specific impingement and combustion events.
Technical Paper

Dynamic Exhaust Valve Flow 1-D Modelling During Blowdown Conditions

2019-01-15
2019-01-0058
To conduct system level studies on internal combustion engines reduced order models are required in order to keep the computational load below reasonable limits. By its nature a reduced order model is a simplification of reality and may introduce modeling errors. However what is of interest is the size of the error and if it is possible to reduce the error by some method. A popular system level study is gas exchange and in this paper the focus is on the exhaust valve. Generally the valve is modeled as an ideal nozzle where the flow losses are captured by reducing the flow area. As the valve moves slowly compared to the flow the process is assumed to be quasi-steady, i.e. interpolation between steady-flow measurements can be used to describe the dynamic process during valve opening. These measurements are generally done at low pressure drops, as the influence of pressure ratio is assumed to be negligible.
Technical Paper

Heavy-Duty Engine Intake Manifold Pressure Virtual Sensor

2019-04-02
2019-01-1170
Increasing demands for more efficient engines and stricter legislations on exhaust emissions require more accurate control of the engine operating parameters. Engine control is based on sensors monitoring the condition of the engine. Numerous sensors, in a complex control context, increase the complexity, the fragility and the cost of the system. An alternative to physical sensors are virtual sensors, observers used to monitor parameters of the engine thus reducing both the fragility and the production cost but with a slight increase of the complexity. In the current paper a virtual intake manifold cylinder port pressure sensor is presented. The virtual sensor is based on a compressible flow model and on the pressure signal of the intake manifold pressure sensor. It uses the linearized pressure coefficient approach to keep vital performance behaviors while still conserving calibration effort and embedded system memory.
Technical Paper

A Test Rig for Evaluating Thermal Cyclic Life and Effectiveness of Thermal Barrier Coatings inside Exhaust Manifolds

2019-04-02
2019-01-0929
Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBCs) may be used on the inner surfaces of exhaust manifolds in heavy-duty diesel engines to improve the fuel efficiency and prolong the life of the component. The coatings need to have a long thermal cyclic life and also be able to reduce the temperature in the substrate material. A lower temperature of the substrate material reduces the oxidation rate and has a positive influence on the thermo-mechanical fatigue life. A test rig for evaluating these properties for several different coatings simultaneously in the correct environment was developed and tested for two different TBCs and one oxidation-resistant coating. Exhausts were redirected from a diesel engine and led through a series of coated pipes. These pipes were thermally cycled by alternating the temperature of the exhausts. Initial damage in the form of cracks within the top coats of the TBCs was found after cycling 150 times between 50°C and 530°C.
Technical Paper

Model-Based Guided Troubleshooting Applied to a Selective Catalytic Reduction System

2018-04-03
2018-01-1355
Troubleshooting trees are traditionally used to guide technicians through the process of identifying the cause of vehicle problems and solving them. These static trees can successfully visualize complex information. However, for modular vehicles, the trees become difficult to create and maintain due to the numerous different configurations of vehicles that can be constructed. These issues can be overcome by using a model-based approach. This paper describes a prototype tool for guided troubleshooting and shows its application to a selective catalytic reduction system used in many heavy vehicles. The troubleshooting tool guides the technician through the troubleshooting process by presenting the most likely fault candidates and recommending the most useful actions to perform. The list of candidates and recommendations are updated continuously to reflect the outcomes of past actions.
Journal Article

Design of a Thermoelectric Generator for Waste Heat Recovery Application on a Drivable Heavy Duty Vehicle

2017-04-11
2017-01-9178
The European Union’s 2020 target aims to be producing 20 % of its energy from renewable sources by 2020, to achieve a 20 % reduction in greenhouse gas emissions and a 20 % improvement in energy efficiency compared to 1990 levels. To reach these goals, the energy consumption has to decrease which results in reduction of the emissions. The transport sector is the second largest energy consumer in the EU, responsible for 25 % of the emissions of greenhouse gases caused by the low efficiency (<40 %) of combustion engines. Much work has been done to improve that efficiency but there is still a large amount of fuel energy that converts to heat and escapes to the ambient atmosphere through the exhaust system. Taking advantage of thermoelectricity, the heat can be recovered, improving the fuel economy.
Technical Paper

A Comparison of On-Engine Surge Detection Algorithms using Knock Accelerometers

2017-10-08
2017-01-2420
On-engine surge detection could help in reducing the safety margin towards surge, thus allowing higher boost pressures and ultimately low-end torque. In this paper, experimental data from a truck turbocharger compressor mounted on the engine is investigated. A short period of compressor surge is provoked through a sudden, large drop in engine load. The compressor housing is equipped with knock accelerometers. Different signal treatments are evaluated for their suitability with respect to on-engine surge detection: the signal root mean square, the power spectral density in the surge frequency band, the recently proposed Hurst exponent, and a closely related concept optimized to detect changes in the underlying scaling behavior of the signal. For validation purposes, a judgement by the test cell operator by visual observation of the air filter vibrations and audible noises, as well as inlet temperature increase, are also used to diagnose surge.
Technical Paper

Optical Studies in a DI Diesel Engine

1999-10-25
1999-01-3650
Fuel injection and combustion was studied with direct photography in a single cylinder DI diesel engine. Optical access was accomplished by using an endoscope-based measurement system. In the optical measurements the influence of several parameters were studied: start of injection, inlet air temperature and pressure, injected fuel amount (constant air mass), load level (varying air and fuel mass) and nozzle hole diameter. Liquid fuel spray penetration, flame lift-off and flame length were measured. The maximum spray penetration was 23 - 25 mm. As diffusion combustion started, the spray length decreased to about 15 mm. The flame lift-off was located 4 - 6 mm behind the liquid fuel spray tip. Using the two-color method the spatial temperature distribution in flames was calculated.
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