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Technical Paper

A Comparison of the Effect of E85 vs. Gasoline on Exhaust System Surface Temperatures

2007-04-16
2007-01-1392
With concerns over increasing worldwide demand for gasoline and greenhouse gases, many automotive companies are increasing their product lineup of vehicles to include flex-fuel vehicles that are capable of operating on fuel blends ranging from 100% gasoline up to a blend of 15% gasoline/85% ethanol (E85). For the purpose of this paper, data was obtained that will enable an evaluation relating to the effect the use of E85 fuel has on exhaust system surface temperatures compared to that of regular unleaded gasoline while the vehicle undergoes a typical drive cycle. Three vehicles from three different automotive manufacturers were tested. The surface of the exhaust systems was instrumented with thermocouples at specific locations to monitor temperatures from the manifold to the catalytic converter outlet. The exhaust system surface temperatures were recorded during an operation cycle that included steady vehicle speed operation; cold start and idle and wide open throttle conditions.
Technical Paper

Steering Grunt Noise Robustness Improvement

2009-05-19
2009-01-2095
Grunt is a structure-born noise caused by resonance of the steering gear torsion bar (T-bar) in an HPAS (Hydraulic Power Assist Steering) system. The goal of this work was to develop techniques to quantify and predict grunt in a RV (rotary valve) steering gear system. First, vehicle testing was used to identify an objective metric for grunt: y = dynamic pressure in the return line. Then, a computer simulation was developed to predict y as a function of two known control factors. The simulation results were correlated to measurements on a test vehicle. Finally, the simulation was expanded to include two additional control factors, and grunt predictions were demonstrated on a different test vehicle.
Technical Paper

Flow Losses at Circular T-Junctions Representative of Intake Plenum and Primary Runner Interface

2004-03-08
2004-01-1414
One of the dominant sources of flow losses in the intake system of internal combustion engines (ICE) with log-style manifolds is the interface between the plenum and primary runner. The present study investigates such losses associated with the dividing flow at the entry to primary runner with geometries representative of those used in ICE. An experimental setup was constructed to measure the flow loss coefficients of T-junctions with all branches of circular cross-section. Experiments were conducted with seven configurations on a steady-flow bench to determine the effects of: (1) interface radius equal to 0, 10, and 20% of the primary runner diameter, (2) plenum to primary runner area ratios of 1, 2.124, and 3.117, and (3) primary runner taper including taper area ratios of 2.124 and 3.117. The last two categories employed 20% interface radii. The total mass flow rate was also varied to investigate the effect of Reynolds number Re on loss coefficients.
Technical Paper

Effects of MMT® Fuel Additive on Emission System Components: Comparison of Clear- and MMT®-fueled Escort Vehicles from the Alliance Study

2004-03-08
2004-01-1084
Emission studies were carried out on clear-fueled and MMT®-fueled 100,000-mile Escort vehicles from the Alliance study [SAE 2002-01-2894]. Alliance testing had revealed substantially higher emissions from the MMT-fueled vehicle, and the present study involved swapping the engine cylinder heads, spark plugs, oxygen sensors, and catalysts between the two vehicles to identify the specific components responsible for the emissions increase. Within 90% confidence limits, all of the emissions differences between the MMT- and Clear-vehicles could be accounted for by the selected components. NMHC emission increases were primarily attributed to the effects of the MMT cylinder head and spark plugs on both engine-out and tailpipe emissions. CO emission increases were largely traced to the MMT cylinder head and its effect on tailpipe emissions. NOx emission increases were linked to the MMT catalyst.
Technical Paper

Development of Shear Fracture Criterion for Dual-Phase Steel Stamping

2009-04-20
2009-01-1172
Forming Limit Diagrams (FLD) have been widely and successfully used in sheet metal stamping as a failure criterion to detect localized necking, which is the most common failure mechanism for conventional steels during forming. However, recent experience from stamping Dual-Phase steels found that, under certain circumstances such as stretching-bend over a small die radius, the sheet metal fails earlier than that predicted by the FLD based on the initiation of a localized neck. It appears that a different failure mechanism and mode are in effect, commonly referred to as “shear fracture” in the sheet metal stamping community. In this paper, experimental and numerical analysis is used to investigate the shear fracture mechanism. Numerical models are established for a stretch-bend test on DP780 steel with a wide range of bend radii for various failure modes. The occurrences of shear fracture are identified by correlating numerical simulation results with test data.
Technical Paper

Numerical Study of Ultra Low Solidity Airfoil Diffuser in an Automotive Turbocharger Compressor

2009-04-20
2009-01-1470
For the application of advanced clean combustion technologies, such as diesel HCCI/LTC, a compressor with high efficiency over a broad operation range is required to supply a high amount of EGR with minimum pumping loss. A compressor with high pitch of vaneless diffuser would substantially improve the flow range of the compressor, but it is at the cost of compressor efficiency, especially at low mass flow area where most of the city driving cycles resides. In present study, an ultra low solidity compressor vane diffuser was numerically investigated. It is well known that the flow leaving the impeller is highly distorted, unsteady and turbulent, especially at relative low mass flow rate and near the shroud side of the compressor. A conventional vaned diffuser with high stagger angle could help to improve the performance of the compressor at low end. However, adding diffuser vane to a compressor typically restricts the flow range at high end.
Technical Paper

Resistance Spot Welding Evaluation of Transformation Induced Plasticity 780 (TRIP780) Steel for Automotive Body Structural Applications

2009-04-20
2009-01-0805
There has been a substantial increase in the use of advanced high strength steel (AHSS) in automotive structures in the last few years. The usage of these materials is projected to grow significantly in the next 5–10 years with the introduction of new safety and fuel economy regulations. AHSS are gaining popularity due to their superior mechanical properties and use in parts for weight savings potential, as compared to mild steels. These new materials pose significant manufacturing challenges, particularly for welding and stamping. Proper understanding of the weldability of these materials is critical for successful application on future vehicle programs. Due to the high strength nature of AHSS materials, higher weld forces and longer weld times are often needed to weld these advanced steels.
Technical Paper

DP590 GI Mechanical Property Variability and Structural Response CAE Studies

2009-04-20
2009-01-0799
Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) such as DP590 HDGI are helping automakers meet increasingly higher structural performance requirements while maintaining or reducing weight of the vehicle body structure [7]. One of the issues facing design engineers implementing new materials such as AHSS is the lack of understanding the expected material variability within a steel supplier and also from one steel supplier to another; and how the variability affects product attribute performances. In this paper, we present an analysis of the aggregated mechanical property variability data obtained from several steel suppliers for a popular AHSS grade and also present studies related to the effect of material variability on structural responses.
Technical Paper

Non-Invasive Differential Thermocouple Method for the Evaluation of Catalyst Performance

2008-04-14
2008-01-0454
A simple non-invasive thermocouple method is described and demonstrated that provides catalyst performance information. The thermocouple circuit consists of a Chromel wire attached to the stainless steel exhaust system before the catalyst and another Chromel wire after the catalyst. The exhaust system stainless steel functions as the other dissimilar metal component of a differential thermocouple. Measured electromotive force (EMF) between the thermocouple leads is proportional to the temperature difference across the catalyst and allows assessment of the performance of the catalyst between the thermocouple junctions. By measuring the difference directly, rather than measuring at two locations and using the difference between high temperatures at the two locations, one obtains a relatively accurate measurement even without calibration. A series of experiments were carried out to demonstrate the catalyst monitoring capabilities of this methodology.
Journal Article

Fracture Modeling of AHSS in Component Crush Tests

2011-04-12
2011-01-0001
Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) have been implemented in the automotive industry to balance the requirements for vehicle crash safety, emissions, and fuel economy. With lower ductility compared to conventional steels, the fracture behavior of AHSS components has to be considered in vehicle crash simulations to achieve a reliable crashworthiness prediction. Without considering the fracture behavior, component fracture cannot be predicted and subsequently the crash energy absorbed by the fractured component can be over-estimated. In full vehicle simulations, failure to predict component fracture sometimes leads to less predicted intrusion. In this paper, the feasibility of using computer simulations in predicting fracture during crash deformation is studied.
Journal Article

Investigation of Compressor Whoosh Noise in Automotive Turbochargers

2009-05-19
2009-01-2053
With swelling gasoline prices, automotive OEMs have taken different approaches to improve vehicle fuel economy. One trend is to down-size the engine and to add turbo charging. One of the challenges in utilizing the turbocharger in passenger cars is to control the added NVH issues associated with this hardware, especially for the North American market where turbocharger use is scarce in gasoline engines. In this paper, the authors review an investigation on turbocharger related “whoosh” noise on a V6 engine. The whoosh noise, also called surge noise, is caused by the compressor working at or near surge conditions. Whoosh noise is a broad frequency band flow noise typically found during throttle tip-in conditions, but sometimes found even at steady state driving conditions. The root cause of whoosh noise and the detection methods are discussed in this paper. The countermeasures to reduce whoosh noises are also discussed.
Technical Paper

Bending Process Optimization of Dual Phase 780 (DP780) Tubes for Body Structural and Chassis Applications

2010-04-12
2010-01-0230
To reach safety, emissions, and cost objectives, manufacturers of automotive body structural and chassis components shape thin gauge, high strength steel tube with a bending, pre-forming and hydroforming process. Challenging grades and bend severity require a careful optimization of the bending procedure. A joint project between Ford and ArcelorMittal Tubular Products investigated suitable bending parameters for severe bends using commercially available thin-walled DP780 and HSLA350 tubes. This paper summarizes the measurement methods found to be capable of capturing small differences in bending formability and details the influence of bender variables such as boost, pressure die, center-line bend radius and bend angle on the wrinkling, thinning and springback of these tubes. As a result of this work, recommendations were made as to effective bender set-ups for these tubes.
Technical Paper

Oil Migration on Sheet Steels and the Effect on Performance in Metal Stamping

1999-03-01
1999-01-0682
Mill oils and prelubes are applied by the steel producer to prevent corrosion and to enhance formability. During coiling, shipping, and storage the lubricant migrates due to pressure and gravity. The redistribution of the lubricant results in widely varying lubricant weights. The move to reduce and eliminate press-applied lubricants has lead to concerns that the variation in lubricant weight as a result of this migration would adversely affect press performance. The Drawbead Simulator (DBS) and Twist Compression Test (TCT) were used to evaluate friction response of electrogalvanized and galvanneal sheet to varying lubricant weight. Results showed the electrogalvanized sheet was sensitive to lubricant type while the galvanneal sheet was sensitive to the amount of lubricant.
Technical Paper

Study of Ausferrite Transformation Kinetics for Austempered Ductile Irons with and without Ni

2016-04-05
2016-01-0421
This research studies the transformation kinetics of austempered ductile iron (ADI) with and without nickel as the main alloying element. ADI has improved mechanical properties compared to ductile iron due to its ausferrite microstructure. Not only can austempered ductile iron be produced with high strength, high toughness and high wear resistance, the ductility of ADI can also be increased due to high carbon content austenite. Many factors influence the transformation of phases in ADI. In the present work, the addition of nickel was investigated based on transformation kinetics and metallography observation. The transformation fractions were determined by Rockwell hardness variations of ADI specimens. The calculation of transformation kinetics and activation energy using the “Avrami Equation” and “Arrhenius Equation” is done to describe effects of nickel alloy for phase reactions.
Technical Paper

Estimates of the Convective Heat-Transfer Coefficients for Under-Hood and Under-Body Components

2019-04-02
2019-01-0149
In this paper we investigate the application of time constant to estimate the external heat transfer coefficient (h) around specific vehicle components. Using this approach, a test sample in the form of a steel plate is placed around the component of interest. A step change is applied to air temperature surrounding the sample. The response of the sample temperature can be analyzed and the heat transfer coefficient can therefore be calculated. Several test samples were installed at several locations in the vehicle under-hood and underbody. A series of vehicle tests were designed to measure the time constant around each component at various vehicle speeds. A correlation between estimated heat transfer coefficients and vehicle speed was generated. The developed correlations and the measured component ambient temperatures can be readily used as input for thermal simulation tools. This approach can be very helpful whenever CFD resources may not be available.
Technical Paper

An Assessment of the Impact of Exhaust Turbine Redesign, for Narrow VGT Operating Range, on the Performance of Diesel Engines with Assisted Turbocharger

2019-04-02
2019-01-0326
Electrically assisted turbochargers are a promising technology for improving boost response of turbocharged engines. These systems include a turbocharger shaft mounted electric motor/generator. In the assist mode, electrical energy is applied to the turbocharger shaft via the motor function, while in the regenerative mode energy can be extracted from the shaft via the generator function, hence these systems are also referred to as regenerative electrically assisted turbochargers (REAT). REAT allows simultaneous improvement of boost response and fuel economy of boosted engines. This is achieved by optimally scheduling the electrical assist and regeneration actions. REAT also allows the exhaust turbine to operate within a narrow range of optimal vane positions relative to the unassisted variable geometry turbocharger (VGT). The ability to operate within a narrow range of VGT vane positions allows an opportunity for a more optimal turbine design for a REAT system.
Technical Paper

Development of a Thermal Fatigue Test Bench for Cylinder Head Materials

2018-04-03
2018-01-1410
An innovative specimen design and test system for thermal fatigue (TF) analysis is developed to compare the fatigue behavior of different cylinder head materials under realistic cyclic thermal loadings. Finite element analyses were performed to optimize the specimen geometry and thermal cycles. The reduced section of the TF specimen is heated locally by a high frequency induction heater and cooled by compressed air. The mechanical strain is then induced internally by the non-uniform thermal gradient generated within the specimen to closely simulate what valve bridges in cylinder heads experience in real operation. The resulting fatigue life is a function not only of the inherent fatigue resistance of the alloys, but also of other relevant properties such as thermal conductivity, modulus of elasticity, and coefficient of thermal expansion. This test is an essential tool for comparing different alloys for thermal fatigue applications.
Technical Paper

Ion Current Measurement of Diluted Combustion Using a Multi-Electrode Spark Plug

2018-04-03
2018-01-1134
Close-loop feedback combustion control is essential for improving the internal combustion engines to meet the rigorous fuel efficiency demands and emission legislations. A vital part is the combustion sensing technology that diagnoses in-cylinder combustion information promptly, such as using cylinder pressure sensor and ion current measurement. The promptness and fidelity of the diagnostic are particularly important to the potential success of using intra-cycle control for abnormal cycles such as super knocking and misfiring. Many research studies have demonstrated the use of ion-current sensing as feedback signal to control the spark ignition gasoline engines, with the spark gap shared for both ignition and ion-current detection. During the spark glow phase, the sparking current may affect the combustion ion current signal. Moreover, the electrode gap size is optimized for sparking rather than measurement of ion current.
Technical Paper

A Modified Oil Lubrication System with Flow Control to Reduce Crankshaft Bearing Friction in a Litre 4 Cylinder Diesel Engine

2016-04-05
2016-01-1045
The oil distribution system of an automotive light duty engine typically has an oil pump mechanically driven through the front-endancillaries-drive or directly off the crankshaft. Delivery pressure is regulated by a relief valve to provide an oil gallery pressure of typically 3 to 4 bar absolute at fully-warm engine running conditions. Electrification of the oil pump drive is one way to decouple pump delivery from engine speed, but this does not alter the flow distribution between parts of the engine requiring lubrication. Here, the behaviour and benefits of a system with an electrically driven, fixed displacement pump and a distributor providing control over flow to crankshaft main bearings and big end bearings is examined. The aim has been to demonstrate that by controlling flow to these bearings, without changing flow to other parts of the engine, significant reductions in engine friction can be achieved.
Technical Paper

Cylinder Head Gasket Fretting/Scrub Mechanism Investigation and Analysis Procedure Developments

2017-03-28
2017-01-1091
Typically, modern automotive engine designs include separate cylinder heads and cylinder blocks and utilize a multilayer steel head gasket to seal the resulting joint. Cylinder head bolts are used to hold the joint together and the non-linear properties of head gasket provide capability to seal the movement within the joint, which is essential for engine durability and performance. There are three major failure modes for head gasket joint: fluid or gas leakage due to low sealing pressure, head gasket bead cracking due to high gap alternation and scrubbing/fretting due to pressure and temperature fluctuations causing lateral movement in the joint. During engine operation, the head gasket design should be robust enough to prevent all three failure modes and the resulting design must consider all three major failure modes to provide acceptable performance.
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