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Technical Paper

Potential of Advanced, Combined Aftertreatment Systems for Light-Duty Diesel Engines to Meet Upcoming EU and US Emission Regulation

2013-09-08
2013-24-0163
The modern DI-diesel engine represents a valuable platform to achieve worldwide tightened CO2 standards while meeting future strengthened emission regulations in the EU and the US. Due to the simultaneous, partially contrary legal demands, new integrated and combined systems are required to allow best overall performance within the upcoming legal frames concerning pollutant emission reduction and minimization of CO2 output. As extended emission relevant areas in the engine map have to be respected in view of RDE and PEMS scenarios in EU, but also facing the LEVIII standards in the US, comprehensive and synchronized technical solutions have to be engineered. Based on furthermore optimized combustion systems with improved combustion efficiency, meaning also lowered exhaust gas temperatures, especially refined and tailored emission control systems are demanded.
Technical Paper

A Low NVH Range-Extender Application with a Small V-2 Engine - Based on a New Vibration Compensation System

2012-10-23
2012-32-0081
The interest in electric propulsion of vehicles has increased in recent years and is being discussed extensively by experts as well as the public. Up to now the driving range and the utilization of pure electric vehicles are still limited in comparison to conventional vehicles due to the limited capacity and the long charging times of today's batteries. This is a challenge to customer acceptance of a pure electric vehicle, even for a city car application. A Range Extender concept could achieve the desired customer acceptance, but should not impact the “electric driving” experience, and should not cause further significant increases in the manufacturing and purchasing cost. The V2 engine concept presented in this paper is particularly suited to a low cost, modular vehicle concept. Advantages regarding packaging can be realized with the use of two generators in combination with the V2 engine.
Technical Paper

Lamborghini Approach to Engine Downsizing Engine Friction Modeling

2013-09-08
2013-24-0088
Downsizing, down speeding and hybridization are becoming a standard in the automotive industry. This paper was initiated to answer Automobili Lamborghini R&D's question: what does downsizing mean In technical literature downsizing is often referred to as reducing displacement and, sometimes, cylinders. Through a methodological approach, analysis and experimental activities Automobili Lamborghini, with FEV's support, shows that downsizing in terms of engine friction reduction means only reduction of displacement. Using the Aventador V12 6.5 liter engine as a baseline, two 4.3 liter engines were designed, a V8 and a V12. The engine friction losses of these two engines were calculated all over the engine speed range and during the NEDC cycle utilizing a simulation tool and verified through FEV's “Strip-Method” database. This approach gives us the holistic understanding on engine components design and which technologies should be introduced for the next Lamborghini engine generation.
Technical Paper

Comparison of Model Predictions with Temperature Data Sensed On-Board from the Li-ion Polymer Cells of an Electric Vehicle

2012-05-15
2011-01-2443
One of the challenges faced when using Li-ion batteries in electric vehicles is to keep the cell temperatures below a given threshold. Mathematical modeling would indeed be an efficient tool to test virtually this requirement and accelerate the battery product lifecycle. Moreover, temperature predicting models could potentially be used on-board to decrease the limitations associated with sensor based temperature feedbacks. Accordingly, we present a complete modeling procedure which was used to calculate the cell temperatures during a given electric vehicle trip. The procedure includes a simple vehicle dynamics model, an equivalent circuit battery model, and a 3D finite element thermal model. Model parameters were identified from measurements taken during constant current and pulse current discharge tests. The cell temperatures corresponding to an actual electric vehicle trip were calculated and compared with measured values.
Technical Paper

A Simulation Study of Electrically Heating Diesel Exhaust

2016-04-05
2016-01-0927
Modifications have been made to the calibration and control of Diesel engines to increase the temperature of the exhaust especially in cold weather and part load operation. The main purpose for this advanced calibration is to enable the reduction of emissions by improving catalytic activity. An alternative method for increasing exhaust temperature is providing electric heat. Test results show the feasibility of applying various amounts of electric heat and the related increases in exhaust temperature as well as speed of heating. Simulation modeling extends the application of electric heat to a complete engine map and explores the potential impact on engine performance and emission reduction benefits.
Technical Paper

Investigation of Insulated Exhaust Manifolds and Turbine Housings in Modern Diesel Engines for Emissions and Fuel Consumption Reduction

2016-04-05
2016-01-1003
Improvements in the efficiency of internal combustion engines has led to a reduction in exhaust gas temperatures. The simultaneous tightening of exhaust emission limits requires ever more complex emission control methods, including aftertreatment whose efficiency is crucially dependent upon the exhaust gas temperature. Double-walled (also called air-gap) exhaust manifold and turbine housing modules made from sheet metal have been used in gasoline engines since 2009. They offer the potential in modern Diesel engines to reduce both the emissions of pollutants and fuel consumption. They also offer advantages in terms of component weight and surface temperatures in comparison to cast iron components. A detailed analysis was conducted to investigate the potential advantages of insulated exhaust systems for modern diesel engines equipped with DOC and SCR coated DPF (SDPF).
Technical Paper

Optimization of Engine Efficiency and Diesel Aftertreatment System Architecture Using an Integrated System Simulation Approach

2016-02-01
2016-28-0227
As emission regulations are becoming increasingly stringent worldwide, multiple exhaust aftertreatment devices are considered in order to minimize diesel engine tailpipe emissions. For the typical diesel applications in developing markets like India, the fuel consumption is a very decisive selling argument for customers. The total cost of ownership needs to be as low as possible. To meet these competing requirements, the aftertreatment and engines must be optimized at the same time as the performance of the one system affects the other. In state-of-the-art calibration processes, the aftertreatment systems are considered separately from the calibration of the thermodynamics. This conventional approach makes it more challenging to achieve a simultaneous optimization of the fuel consumption and tailpipe emissions under transient operating conditions.
Technical Paper

Developing Drivetrain Robustness for Small Engine Testing

2013-04-08
2013-01-0400
The increased demand in fuel economy and the reduction of CO₂ emissions results in continued efforts to downsize engines. The downsizing efforts result in engines with lower displacement as well as lower number of cylinders. In addition to cylinder and displacement downsizing the development community embarks on continued efforts toward down-speeding. The combination of the aforementioned factors results in engines which can have high levels of torsional vibrations. Such behavior can have detrimental effects on the drivetrain particularly during the development phase of these. Driveshafts, couplings, and dynamometers are exposed to these torsional forces and depending on their frequency costly damages in these components can occur. To account for these effects, FEV employs a multi-body-system modeling approach through which base engine information is used to determine optimized drivetrain setups. All mechanical elements in the setup are analyzed based on their torsional behavior.
Technical Paper

15 Years of Transfer Path Analysis VINS in the Vehicle NVH Development - Selected Results

2014-06-30
2014-01-2047
Transfer path analysis is a powerful tool to support the vehicle NVH development. On the one hand it is a fast method to gain an overview of the complex interplay in the vehicle noise generation process. On the other hand it can be used to identify critical noise paths and vehicle components responsible for specific noise phenomena. FEV has developed several tools, which are adapted to the considered noise phenomena: Powertrain induced interior noise and vibration is analyzed by VINS (Vehicle Interior Noise Simulation), which allows the deduction of improvement measures fast enough for application in the accelerated vehicle development process. Further on vehicle/powertrain combinations not realized in hardware can be evaluated by virtual installation of the powertrain in the vehicle, which is especially interesting in the context of engine downsizing from four to three or six to four cylinders.
Technical Paper

Modelling a Gasoline Compression Ignition (GCI) Engine Concept

2014-04-01
2014-01-1305
Future engines and vehicles will be required to reduce both regulated and CO2 emissions. To achieve this performance, they will be configured with advanced hardware and engine control technology that will enable their operation on a broader range of fuel properties than today. Previous work has shown that an advanced compression ignition bench engine can operate successfully on a European market gasoline over a range of speed/load conditions while achieving diesel-like engine efficiency and acceptable regulated emissions and noise levels. Stable Gasoline CI (GCI) combustion using a European market gasoline was achieved at high to medium engine loads but combustion at lower loads was very sensitive to EGR rates, leading to longer ignition delays and a steep cylinder pressure rise.
Technical Paper

Achieving Optimum Crankshaft Design - I

2014-04-01
2014-01-0930
The increasing pressure on the engine development process via tighter legislations and increasing competition lead to search for the best possible design for each engine component. Especially the dynamic parts, which contribute to total engine friction at most, are under extreme focus. The search for the optimum layout of crankshafts considering the design aims, such as low friction, low weight and high durability, is usually a manual variation process with limited number of design loops. Within this study computer aided (CA) automated optimization methodologies are integrated into the design procedure to achieve the best possible design solution according to the objectives under consideration of the predefined constraints. An extensive crankshaft optimization study is performed and resulted in many novel and patented design features. A case study for a modern in-line four-cylinder crankshaft is performed to show the potentials.
Journal Article

Optimization of Electrified Powertrains for City Cars

2012-06-01
2011-01-2451
Sustainable and energy-efficient consumption is a main concern in contemporary society. Driven by more stringent international requirements, automobile manufacturers have shifted the focus of development into new technologies such as Hybrid Electric Vehicles (HEVs). These powertrains offer significant improvements in the efficiency of the propulsion system compared to conventional vehicles, but they also lead to higher complexities in the design process and in the control strategy. In order to obtain an optimum powertrain configuration, each component has to be laid out considering the best powertrain efficiency. With such a perspective, a simulation study was performed for the purpose of minimizing well-to-wheel CO2 emissions of a city car through electrification. Three different innovative systems, a Series Hybrid Electric Vehicle (SHEV), a Mixed Hybrid Electric Vehicle (MHEV) and a Battery Electric Vehicle (BEV) were compared to a conventional one.
Journal Article

Crankcase and Crankshaft Coupled Structural Analysis Based on Hybrid Dynamic Simulation

2013-12-20
2013-01-9047
This paper presents the comparison of two different approaches for crankcase structural analysis. The first approach is a conventional quasi-static simulation, which will not be detailed in this work and the second approach involves determining the dynamic loading generated by the crankshaft torsional, flexural and axial vibrations on the crankcase. The accuracy of this approach consists in the development of a robust mathematical model that can couple the dynamic characteristics of the crankshaft and the crankcase, representing realistically the interaction between both components. The methodology to evaluate these dynamic responses is referred to as hybrid simulation, which consists of the solution of the dynamics of an E-MBS (Elastic Multi Body System) coupled with consecutive FEA (Finite Element Analysis).
Journal Article

Validation of a 1D Compressor Model for Performance Prediction

2013-09-08
2013-24-0120
In the present paper, a recently developed centrifugal compressor model is briefly summarized. It provides a refined geometrical schematization of the device, especially of the impeller, starting from a reduced set of linear and angular dimensions. A geometrical module reproduces the 3D geometry of the impeller and furnishes the data employed to solve the 1D flow equations inside the rotating and stationary ducts constituting the complete device. The 1D compressor model allows to predict the performance maps (pressure ratio and efficiency) with good accuracy, once the tuning of a number of parameters is realized to characterize various flow losses and heat exchange. To overcome the limitations related to the model tuning, unknown parameters are selected with reference to 5 different devices employing an optimization procedure (modeFRONTIER™).
Journal Article

Advanced Numerical and Experimental Techniques for the Extension of a Turbine Mapping

2013-09-08
2013-24-0119
1D codes are nowadays commonly used to investigate a turbocharged ICE performance, turbo-matching and transient response. The turbocharger is usually described in terms of experimentally derived characteristic maps. The latter are commonly measured using the compressor as a brake for the turbine, under steady “hot gas” tests. This approach causes some drawbacks: each iso-speed is commonly limited to a narrow pressure ratio and mass flow rate range, while a wider operating domain is experienced on the engine; the turbine thermal conditions realized on the test rig may strongly differ from the coupled-to-engine operation; a “conventional” net turbine efficiency is really measured, since it includes the effects of the heat exchange on the compressor side, together with bearing friction and windage losses.
Journal Article

Vehicle Demonstration of Naphtha Fuel Achieving Both High Efficiency and Drivability with EURO6 Engine-Out NOx Emission

2013-04-08
2013-01-0267
Demand for transport energy is growing but this growth is skewed heavily toward commercial transport, such as, heavy road, aviation, marine and rail which uses heavier fuels like diesel and kerosene. This is likely to lead to an abundance and easy availability of lighter fractions like naphtha, which is the product of the initial distillation of crude oil. Naphtha will also require lower energy to produce and hence will have a lower CO₂ impact compared to diesel or gasoline. It would be desirable to develop engine combustion systems that could run on naphtha. Many recent studies have shown that running compression ignition engines on very low Cetane fuels, which are very similar to naphtha in their auto-ignition behavior, offers the prospect of developing very efficient, clean, simple and cheap engine combustion systems. Significant development work would be required before such systems could power practical vehicles.
Technical Paper

In-Use Compliance Opportunity for Diesel Powertrains

2018-04-03
2018-01-0877
In-use compliance under LEV III emission standards, GHG, and fuel economy targets beyond 2025 poses a great opportunity for all ICE-based propulsion systems, especially for light-duty diesel powertrain and aftertreatment enhancement. Though diesel powertrains feature excellent fuel-efficiency, robust and complete emissions controls covering any possible operational profiles and duty cycles has always been a challenge. Significant dependency on aftertreatment calibration and configuration has become a norm. With the onset of hybridization and downsizing, small steps of improvement in system stability have shown a promising avenue for enhancing fuel economy while continuously improving emissions robustness. In this paper, a study of current key technologies and associated emissions robustness will be discussed followed by engine and aftertreatment performance target derivations for LEV III compliant powertrains.
Technical Paper

Advanced Powertrain Systems Control in Combination with Specifically Optimized Air- and Fuel Path Components to Realise Short Term CO2 Emissions Reduction with an Existing 2.2l I4 Diesel Engine Architecture

2014-10-13
2014-01-2853
In September 2013 the Jaguar XF 2.2l ECO sport brake and saloon were introduced to the European market. They are the first Jaguar vehicles to realize CO2 emissions below 130 g/km. To achieve these significantly reduced fuel consumption values with an existing 2.2l I4 Diesel engine architecture, selected air path and fuel path components were optimized for increased engine efficiency. Tailored hardware selection and streamlined development were only enabled by the consequent utilisation of the most advanced CAE tools throughout the design phase but also during the complete vehicle application process.
Technical Paper

Accurate Mean Value Process Models for Model-Based Engine Control Concepts by Means of Hybrid Modeling

2019-04-02
2019-01-1178
Advanced powertrains for modern vehicles require the optimization of conventional combustion engines in combination with tailored electrification and vehicle connectivity strategies. The resulting systems and their control devices feature many degrees of freedom with a large number of available adjustment parameters. This obviously presents major challenges to the development of the corresponding powertrain control logics. Hence, the identification of an optimal system calibration is a non-trivial task. To address this situation, physics-based control approaches are evolving and successively replacing conventional map-based control strategies in order to handle more complex powertrain topologies. Physics-based control approaches enable a significant reduction in calibration effort, and also improve the control robustness.
Technical Paper

Hybrid Dynamic Analysis of Crankshaft-Crankcase for Off-Road Engine Application

2015-09-22
2015-36-0120
This work presents the results and methodology of a dynamic durability analysis considering the interaction between crankcase and crankshaft. The approach is based on a robust mathematical model that couples the dynamic characteristics of the crankshaft and crankcase, representing the actual interaction between both components. Dynamic loadings generated by the crankshaft are transferred to the crankcase through flexible 3D hydrodynamic bearings. This methodology is referred to as hybrid simulation, which consists in the solution of the dynamics of an Elastic Multi-Body System (E-MBS) coupled with the Finite Element Methodology (FEM). For this study, it was considered an in-line 6-cylinder diesel engine used in off-road applications. The crankcase design must withstand higher loads due to new calibration targets stipulated for PROCONVE (MAR-I) emission regulations.
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