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Technical Paper

Gas Exchange Optimization and the Impact on Emission Reduction for HSDI Diesel Engines

2009-04-20
2009-01-0653
The main tasks for all future powertrain developments are: regulated emissions, CO2-values, comfort, good drivability, high reliability and affordable costs. One widely discussed approach for fuel consumption improvement within passenger car applications, is to incorporate the downsizing effect. To attain constant engine performance an increase of boost pressure and/or rated speed is mandatory. In both cases, the mass flow rate through the intake and exhaust ports and valves will rise. In this context, the impact of the port layout on the system has to be reassessed. In this paper, the impact of the port layout on a modern diesel combustion system will be discussed and a promising concept shall be described in detail. The investigations shown include flow measurements, PIV measurements of intake flow, CFD simulations of the flow field during intake and results from the thermodynamic test bench. One of the important topics is to prove the impact of the flow quality on the combustion.
Technical Paper

Low Emission and Fuel Consumption Natural Gas Engines with High Power Density for Stationary and Heavy-Duty Application

1999-08-17
1999-01-2896
Today, natural gas engines for stationary and vehicular applications are not only faced with stringent emission legislation, but also with increasing requirements for power density and efficient fuel consumption. For vehicular use, downsizing is an advantageous approach to lowering on-road fuel consumption and making gas engines more competitive with their diesel counterparts. In SI-engines, the power density at a given compression ratio is limited by knocking, or NOx emissions. A decrease in compression ratio, lowering both NOx emissions and the risk of knocking combustion, increases fuel consumption. An increase in air-fuel-ratio, required to avoid knocking at higher thermal loading, increases boost pressure, HC and CO emissions, and mechanical loading and causes the danger of misfiring. As a result, the performance of the latest production gas engines for vehicles remains at a BMEP of 18…20 bar with a NOx emission level of 2…5 g/kWh.
Technical Paper

A New Approach to Boost Pressure and EGR Rate Control Development for HD Truck Engines with VGT

2002-03-04
2002-01-0964
Future HD Diesel engine technology is facing a combination of both extremely low exhaust emission standards (US 2002/2004, EURO IV and later US 2007, EURO V) and new engine test procedures such as the European Transient Cycle (ETC) in Europe and the Not-to-Exceed Area (NTE) in the US). Customers furthermore require increased engine performance, improved efficiency, and long-term durability. In order to achieve all targets simultaneously, future HD Diesel engines must have improved fuel injection and combustion systems and utilize suitable technologies such as exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), variable geometry turbine turbocharger systems (VGT) and exhaust gas after-treatment systems. Future systems require precision controlled EGR in combination with a VGT-turbocharger during transient operation. This will require new strategies and calibration for the Electronic Engine Control Unit (ECU).
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