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Technical Paper

Closed Loop Combustion Control - Enabler of Future Refined Engine Performance Regarding Power, Efficiency, Emissions & NVH under Stringent Governmental Regulations

2011-09-11
2011-24-0171
Both, the continuous strengthening of the exhaust emission legislation and the striving for a substantial reduction of the carbon dioxide output in the traffic sector depict substantial requirements for the global automotive industry and especially for the engine manufacturers. From the multiplicity of possible approaches and strategies for clear compliance with these demands, engine internal measures offer a large and, eventually more important, very economical potential. For example, the achievements in fuel injection technology are a measure which in the last years has contributed significantly to a notable reduction of the emissions of the modern DI Diesel engines at favorable fuel efficiency. Besides the application of modern fuel injection technology, the linked combustion control (Closed Loop Combustion Control) opens possibilities for a further optimization of the combustion process.
Technical Paper

Exhaust Temperature Management for Diesel Engines Assessment of Engine Concepts and Calibration Strategies with Regard to Fuel Penalty

2011-09-11
2011-24-0176
Both, the continuous strengthening of the exhaust emission legislation and the striving for a substantial reduction of carbon dioxide output in the traffic sector depict substantial requirements for the development of future diesel engines. These engines will comprise not only the mandatory diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) and particulate filter DPF but a NOx aftertreatment system as well - at least for heavier vehicles. The oxidation catalysts as well as currently available NOx aftertreatment technologies, i.e., LNT and SCR, rely on sufficient exhaust gas temperatures to achieve a proper conversion. This is getting more and more critical due to the fact that today's and future measures for CO₂ reduction will result in further decrease of engine-out temperatures. Additionally this development has to be considered in the light of further engine electrification and hybridization scenarios.
Technical Paper

Fuel Consumption and Exhaust Emissions of Diesel, Gasoline and Natural Gas Fuelled Vehicles

2001-11-01
2001-28-0068
With regard to increasingly stringent emission legislation natural gas is gaining interest as an alternate fuel. Concerning mobile application natural gas is often considered to produce potentially lower exhaust emissions compared to diesel and gasoline fuel. Nevertheless, also the exhaust gas of diesel and gasoline fuelled vehicles will be improved by applying advanced technical solutions. The paper reveals the state-of-the-art in exhaust emission behaviour of diesel, gasoline, liquified petroleum gas and natural gas fuelled vehicles. Passenger cars and light-duty trucks will be considered as well as HD-trucks. Emissions include NOx, THC, NMHC, CO, Aldehydes and PAH. In addition CH4 and CO2 emissions are discussed with respect to increasing concern about the greenhouse effect. From the viewpoint of the HD-engines the alternate fuels Dimethylether (DME) and Diesel/water-Emulsion are also considered.
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